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Full text of "The town of Hingham in the late Civil War : with sketches of its soldiers and sailors : also the address and other exercises at the dedication of the Soldiers' and Sailors' Monument"



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IN THE 



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BOOK 974.46.B94T c 1 

aJlr iln"^" °' ^^'NGHAM IN LATE 
,?^L^?." WITH SKETCHES OF ,T<: c 




CHES OF ITS SO 



T1S3 0D0SSS17 T 



^M 



THE 



TOWN OF HINGHAM ^"^ 



IN 



THE LATE CIVIL WAR, 



WITH 



SKETCHES OF ITS SOLDIERS AND SAILORS. 



ALSO 



THE ADDRESS 



AND OTHER EXERCISES 



AT THE 



©etitcation of tf)f ^oltiifrs' anti bailors' IHomimrnt. 



PREPARED BY 



FEARING BURR axd GEORGE LINCOLN. 



PUBLISHED BY ORDER OF THE TOWX. 
1876. 



jp'il^l 




At the Annual Meeting of the inhabitants of Hingham, held Mon- 
day, March 6, 187 1, it was — 

" Voted, That the Report of the Committee on the Soldiers' and 
Sailors' Monument be accepted, and their recommendations be adopted, 
and that the report be recommitted to the Committee for publication 
in accordance with their report." 

Hingham, May 15, 1871. 

At a meeting of the Committee on Soldiers' and Sailors' Monument, 
it was 

" Voted, That Messrs. George Lincoln, Fearing Burr, John Cushing, 
and Col. Hawkes Fearing be a committee to compile a report of the 
doings of the Committee on Soldiers' and Sailors' Monument for pub- 
lication, including the report made to the Town at the last March 
meeting. 

" Voted, that the Committee have power to fill vacancies." 

[Signed] John M. Corbett, Secretary. 

Hingham, June 19, 1871. 

At a meeting of the Committee chosen to prepare for publication the 
proceedings at the Dedication of the Soldiers' and Sailors' Monument, 
it was 

" Voted, That the subject matter, and the work of preparation, be left 
with George Lincoln and Fearing Burr." 

At a meeting of the inhabitants of Hingham, held Nov. 10, 187 1, it 

was 

" Voted, That the Soldiers' and Sailors' Monument Committee be 
authorized to publish an account of the action of the To^vn, and a 
record of its Soldiers and Sailors during the rebellion, in connection 
with the Dedicatory Exercises which they were authorized to have 
printed by a vote of the Town at the meeting in March last." . 



IN 



Commemoration of tlj£ Sacrifice 



THE SONS OF HINGHAM 

FOR FREEDOM 

AND THE CAUSE OF A UNITED 
COUNTRY. 




PREFATORY REMARKS. 



This volume has been prepared by the undersigned at the 
request of the Committee on the Soldiers' and Sailors' Monu- 
ment. It was understood to be the wish of this Committee that 
the work should embrace, in addition to the address and general 
exercises relating to the dedication of the Monument, a record 
of the services of all connected with the Town of Hingham who 
took part in the suppression of the rebellion, and a memorial 
sketch of that portion who fell for the cause they were striving 
to support and defend. 

At the time the commission was placed in our hands, the 
Committee could scarcely have realized the magnitude of the 
labor they had thus imposed. It was certainly not foreseen by 
us. We had but entered on our work, ere it became evident, 
that, in order to a faithful history, much more should be com- 
prised than was at first contemplated. The action of the Town 
at its numerous meetings ; the frequent, less formal gatherings 
of our citizens ; the efforts for filling the quotas required of the 
town ; the draft ; the patriotic co-operation of the ladies in their 
noble labors for the supply of comfortable apparel for those en- 
gaged in the service, and for providing the numerous articles 
needed for the relief and sustenance of the sick and wounded, — 
these, and a vast amount of historical facts of a more general 
character, we were soon convinced could not be omitted without 
greatly impairing the interest and value of the publication. 



8 PREFATORY REMARKS. 

The collection of so much material was a matter not readily 
accomplished. The sources of information, even when known, 
were not always easily reached, and the particulars obtained 
often proved partial or unreliable. In addition to this, the diffi- 
culties attendant on revising, selecting, and arranging, made the 
fulfilment of our task slow, laborious, and oftentimes discouraging. 

But earnestly desiring to answer the expectations of those 
more directly interested, as well as to meet the wishes of our 
citizens generally, we have given to the work committed to us 
our best endeavors. No available sources of information have 
been neglected that might aid in any degree to render the 
volume more complete and accurate. We have addressed a call 
to every surviving soldier and seaman, — native, resident, or 
otherwise associated with the Town, — for a statement of his ex- 
perience in the great conflict. Correspondence has been opened 
with almost every section of the Union. Every document in 
possession of the Town has been not only carefully examined, but 
literally transcribed. 

The sketches of the heroic dead are the results of our un- 
wearied care and solicitude. To present, in full, the details of 
their history, their privations and sufferings, and the incidents 
connected with the one great sacrifice made for their country, 
we have personally appealed, for facts, to relatives, comrades, 
and friends. 

Our progress has thus been unavoidably slow ; and it was 
natural that the public, perhaps not understanding the actual 
extent of the work in which we were engaged, or fully realizing 
that it was being gratuitously performed, should have become 
somewhat impatient at the seemingly unnecessary delay. From 
the one hand came the general appeal for the early appearance 
of the volume ; while, on the other, it was evident that time was 
slowly giving accuracy, fulness, and interest to the work as it 



PREFATORY REMARKS. g 

Steadily progressed toward completion. We feel it, however, but 
just to add, that to avoid apparent remissness, and to meet the 
calls of those who looked upon the publication as too long de- 
ferred, we have devoted — and not infrequently — a measure of 
time, duty to ourselves and those dependent on us would seem 
to have suggested should have been elsewhere bestowed. 

For any errors, which, notwithstanding the strictest care and 
diligence, may have found their way to the pages of the volume, 
we ask the indulgence of the public. Inaccuracies met us at 
almost every step, and to avoid them we were early convinced 
would be an impossibility. They were found in the pages of 
official documents published by the State, as well as among the 
papers in possession of the Town ; artd they not infrequently 
occur in the journals and periodicals of the time. They were 
communicated by correspondents, and given in verbal answers 
to applications made for facts, or the verification of names and 
dates. They will be found in the literal transcripts of narra- 
tives, designed and believed on the part of the authors to be 
true and accurate, and they will be noticed by surviving com- 
peers in the records of the heroic dead. 

But having steadily labored with an earnest desire and purpose 
to present the history of each soldier and seaman in strict ac- 
cordance with the facts known to us, and having conscientiously 
aimed to bestow on every act of courage and heroism the 
acknowledgment and meed of praise to which it may be justly 
entitled, we claim the kind forbearance of those — if such there 
be — who may think their record impaired either by errors of 
omission or commission, as well as from any who may feel that 
like experience has failed to receive like commendation. 

Finally, our fellow-citizens are assured that a reviewal of the 
acts of the Town during the rebellion will afford every truly 
patriotic heart the most unalloyed gratification. There is no page 



lO PREFATORY REMARKS. 

of its history that bears not ample testimony to the single-heart- 
edness of the people of Hingham in their fidelity to the integrity 
of the Union. Promptly responding to the call of the executive 
for mihtary aid, the citizen soldiers of Hingham were among the 
first to take arms, as they were the first to leave the State for 
the seat of war. No subsequent occasion created a need which 
the liberality of our people did not supply ; and no appeal, how- 
ever exacting, was made by our common country which di-d not 
enlist the heartiest sympathy and co-operation. Kindred, friends, 
substance, were offered for the cause by cheerful hands. Re- 
verses, however numerous or severe, never for an instant gave 
rise to despair. The faith in the final success of a cause deemed 
most dear and sacred, if at times weakened, was never broken. 
It was this faith which stimulated and inspired the public heart 
at the beginning ; and we believe, under Providence, it was its 
sustaining power and influence which in the end secured the 
final triumph for the Union, and for the establishment and per- 
petuity of universal freedom. 

Fearing Burr, 

George Lincoln. 



ACKNOWLEDGMENTS. 



It remains for us to express our acknowledgments to the 
several gentlemen, who, cheerfully co-operating in our labors, 
have rendered us much valuable aid in the preparation of the 
volume for publication. 

To Hon. Benjamin W. Harris, our Representative in Congress 
from the Second District, we are under especial obligations. 
Our numerous calls for time and services have uniformly received 
attention, and could scarcely have been answered with greater 
promptitude, or more fully and acceptably. He has won our 
esteem as a faithful public servant, and is tendered our heartiest 
thanks. 

Our acknowledgments are also due to Capt. Lemuel Pope, 
of Hingham, for assistance rendered in revising the portion of 
the volume relating to the Navy ; a work to which he devoted 
much valuable time, and one which a large experience in this 
department of the service during the war eminently fitted him 
to perform. 

John D. Long, Esq., will please accept our thanks for his ready 
and cheerful compliance with our request that he would provide 
the introduction to the chapter on the dead. 

Arthur Lincoln, Esq., also is tendered our acknowledgments 
for a like ready service in supplying the memorial sketch of 
President Lincoln. 

We would further express our obligations to Henry Siders, 
Esq., chairman of the Board of Selectmen, for facts required 



1 2 A CKNO IV L ED GMENTS. 

from the records of the Town ; and also to Mr. Hosah G. Good- 
rich, of the West Grammar School, for acceptable services. 

To these expressions of our indebtedness for personal favors, 
it is but just to recognize the assistance derived from the publi- 
cations of the adjutant-general of Massachusetts, and particularly 
for the facts supplied by the columns of "The Hingham Journal." 

Fearing Burr, 
George Lincoln. 

Hingham, Jan. i, 1876. 



CONTENTS. 



CHAPTER I. 

THE MONUMENT. PAGE. 

Proposition to procure Marble Tablets — Action of the Town — Decision in favor of a Mon- 
ument — Committee chosen to carry the Vote of the Town into Effect — Appropriation 
by tha Town — Additional Sum received by Subscription — Contract between the Com- 
mittee, and the Proprietors of Hingham Cemetery — Transactions of the Committee — 
Acceptance of the Monument from F. J. Fuller of Quincy, the Architect and Builder 

— Chief Marshal's Notice — Order of Notice — Military Pageant — Address at Agri- 
cultural Hall by the Orator of the Day, Hon. Solomon Lincoln — Exercises at 
Hingham Cemetery — Unveiling of the Monument — Remarks by the President of 
the Day, Hon. Albert Fearing — Presentation of the Monument to the Town 
Authorities, and Acceptance of the Same — Original Odes — Remarks by Messrs. 
John Cushing and others, on the Part of the Monument Committee, and of Henry 
Siders, Esq., Chairman of the Board of Selectmen — Description of the Monument 

— List of Names thereon — Final Report of the Monument Committee .... 19 

CHAPTER IL 

PROCEEDINGS OF TOWN AND CITIZENS' MEETINGS. 

Relief for the Families of the Lincoln Light Infantry — Meetings held by the Ladies to 
make Garments for the Soldiers — Appropriation by the Town — Committees ap- 
pointed — Public Reception of th2 Lincoln Light Infantry on their Return from 
Fortress Monroe — Aid to the Families of Volunteers — Bounty to Volunteers — 
Committee chosen to encourage Enlistments for Three Years — Increase of Bounty 
offered to Volunteers for Nine Months — Liberality of the Citizens — The Second 
Battle of Bull Run — The Ladies meet on Sunday to prepare Hospital Supplies — 
War-Meetings — Earnest Call for Enlistments — Companies of " Exempts " formed 

— Parade of the "Home Guards," and Address by Rev. Joseph Richardson — 
Appropriations for Town and State Aid — More War-Meetings — Letter from Gov. 
Andrew — Meetings of Citizens liable to Draft — Rallying 'Committee appointed — 
Citizens' Subscription — Individual Acts of Generosity — Recruiting Money to be 
Refunded — Town Assistance in obtaining Recruits — The Great National Calamity 

— Meeting of Citizens — Expressions of Grief — Funeral Ceremonies 60 

CHAPTER III. 

DRAFTS AND SUBSTITUTES. 

The Drafts — Act of Congress regulating Enrolments — Number of Persons enrolled in 
Hingham — The Draft at Taunton — List of tha Drafted — List of Persons exempted 



J. CONTENTS. 

by Payment of Commutation — Copy of Notice to Persons drafted — Copy of Receipt 
for Money paid for Commutation — Copy of Certificate of Non-Liability given by 
Board of Enrolment — Opening of Recruiting-Office — Re-enlistments from the 
Thirty-Second Regiment — Substitutes 79 

CHAPTER IV. 
Abraham Lincoln ..... 89 

CHAPTER V. 

THE LINCOLN LIGHT INFANTRY. 

Introductory — The Lincoln Light Infantry — Telegraph Despatch from Gov. Andrew 

— Roll of Members and Volunteers — Public Exercises and Incidents on leaving 
Hingham — Arrival in Boston — Departure — Passage to Fortress Monroe — Addi- 
tional Volunteers leave Hingham, — and embark at Boston by Steamer " Cambridge " 

— Arrival and joining of the Company at Fortress Monroe — Five Weeks at Fortress 
Monroe — Newport News — Expiration of Term of Enlistment — Embark at Fortress 
Monroe for Boston — Reception in Boston —Arrival and Reception at Hingham — 
History of the Company 95 

CHAPTER VI. 

ONE HUNDRED DAYS' MEN. 

Expiration of Term of Enlistment of First Three Years' Men — Danger of the National 
Capital — Furloughs granted for Re-enlistment — Call for Eighty-five Thousand One 
Hundred Days' Men — Quota of Massachusetts — Number f lunished by Massachu- 
setts—Enlistments from Hingham — Fifth Regiment — Forty-Second Regiment — 
Sixtieth Regiment — List of One Hundred Days' Men in 

CHAPTER VII. 

NINE months' men. 

Call for Three Hundred Thousand Men to serve for Nine Months — Time allowed for 
Recruiting — Quota of Hingham — Recruits from Plymouth, Middleboro', and Quincy 

— Fourth Regiment — Fifth Regiment — Sixth Regiment — Forty-Third Regiment — 
Forty-Fourth Regiment — Forty-Fifth Regiment — Fiftieth Regiment — Eleventh 
Light Battery — List of Nine Months' Men 116 

CHAPTER VIII. 

ONE-YEAR MEN. 

Enlistments from Hingham — Sixty-First Regiment — Sixty-Second Regiment —Fourth 

Regiment Heavy Artillery — Miscellaneous Assignments 132 

CHAPTER IX. 

THREE YEARS' MEN. * 

Introductory — Calls of the National Government for Three Years' Men — The 
First Regiment — Second Regiment — Seventh Regiment — Ninth — Eleventh — • 
Twelfth — ThirteentJi — Fourteenth — Fifteenth — Sixteenth — Seventeenth — Eigh- 



CONTENTS. I - 

teenth — Nineteenth — T wen tietli — Twenty-First — Twenty-Second — Twenty-Third 
— Twenty-Fourth — Twenty-Sixth — Twenty-Eighth — Twenty-Ninth — Thirtieth — 
Thirty-First 140 



CHAPTER X. 

THIRTY-SECOND REGIMENT. 

Organization — Recruiting by Capt. Stephenson at Camp Dimmick, Hingham — Thirty- 
one Men from Camp Cameron — Mustering of Company — Leave for Fort Warren — 
Recruiting by Lieut. Lyman B. Whiton, at Oasis Hall — Recruits leave Hingham for 
Camp Cameron — Consolidation with Co. E — Co. F — Number of Hingham 
Enlistments in the Thirty-Second Regiment — List of Battles — Number of Killed 
and Wounded— Sketch of the Battle of Laurel Hill 184 

CHAPTER XL 

THREE years' men CONTINUED. 

Thirty-Fifth Regiment — Thirty-Eighth Regiment — Thirty-Ninth Regiment — Fortieth 
Regiment — Fifty-Fourth Regiment — Fifty-Fifth Regiment — Fifty-Sixth Regiment 
— Fifty-Seventh Regiment — Fifty-Eighth Regiment — Fifty-Ninth Regiment . 219 

CHAPTER XIL 

three years' MEN CONTINUED. 

First Regiment Hea\'y Artillery — Third Do. — First Battery Light Artillery — Third 

Do. — Tenth Do. — List of Men in Regiments of Artillery and Batteries . . . 248 

CHAPTER XIIL 

three years' men CONCLUDED. 

First Regiment of Cavalry — Second Regiment Do. — Fourth Regiment Do. — Fifth Do. 

— List of Men in Cavalry Service 259 

CHAPTER XIV. 
Additional Enlistments 271 

CHAPTER XV. 
Veteran Reserve Corps and Regular Army 279 

CHAPTER XVL 
Enlistments in other States of Natives or Residents of Hingham . . 284 

CHAPTER XVIL 

the navy. 

Number of Massachusetts Men in tlie Navy — Number of Hingham Men in the Navy — 

Naval Records 296 



1 6 • CONTENTS. 

CHAPTER XVIII. 

IN MEMORIAM. 

Soldiers and Sailors who were Natives, Residents, or otherwise connected with Hingham, 
who died in the Service, or Prior to the Erection of the Monument — Biographical 
Sketches 315 

CHAPTER XIX. 

Further Enlistments — List of Battles and Skirmishes mentioned in the Preceding 

Records — Summary 417 

APPENDIX. 

List of Persons who Contributed toward the Erection of the Soldiers' and Sailors' Monu- 
ment, arranged by Families 429 

Omission 439 

Errata 419 

Index 441 



HINGHAM IN THE CIVIL WAR. 



HINGHAM IN THE CIVIL WAR. 



CHAPTER I. 



THE MONUMENT. 



Proposition to procure Marble Tablets— Action of the Town — Decision in Favor of a 
Monument — Committee chosen to carry the Vote of the To\\n into Effect — Appropriation 
by the Town — Additional Sum received by Subscription — Contract between the Ccmmit- 
tee, and the Proprietors of Hingham Cemetery — Transactions of the Committee — Accept- 
ance of the Monument from F. J. Fuller of Ouincy, the Architect and Builder — Chief 
Marshal's Notice — Order of Notice — Military Pageant — Address at Agricultural Hall by 
the Orator of the Day, Hon. Solomon Lincoln — Exercises at Hingham Cemetery — 
Unveiling of the Monument — Remarks by the President of the Day. Hon. Albert Fearing 

— Presentation of the Monument to the Town Authorities, and Acceptance of the Same 

— Original Odes — Remarks by Messrs. John Cushing and others, • on the Part of the 
Monument Committee, and of Henry Siders, Esq., Chairman of the Board of Selectmen — 
Description of the Monument — List of Names thereon — Final Report of the Monument 
Committee. 

THE first proposition relating to the establishment of a suit- 
able memorial to the deceased soldiers and sailors of 
Hingham was brought before the inhabitants of the Town at the 
annual meeting held March 3, 1868, when, by unanimous consent, 
Col. Charles W. Seymour offered the following resolution, viz. : — 
''Resolved, That the Town of Hingham cause marble tablets 
to be placed on the walls of the Town Hall, and that the names 
of all soldiers and sailors, both native and resident, who gave 
their lives in the country's defence in the late rebellion, be 
engraved on the tablets placed on the end of the hall, and that 
the names of all enlisted men (volunteers and those who were 
drafted) to the several quotas of the town be engraved on those 
placed on the side walls." The resolution was favorably consid- 
ered ; but, as it could not legally be acted upon at the time, the 
subject was referred to the selectmen. 



20 HINGHAM IN THE CIVIL WAR. 

Among the articles in the warrant for the annual meeting 
March 8, 1869, were the following : — 

"31. To hear the Report of the Selectmen to whom was 
referred the subject of procuring tablets to be placed in the 
Town Hall." 

" 32. What action will the Town take toward the erection of 
a suitable monument in memory of those soldiers and sailors, 
citizens of this town, who gave their lives in support of the 
cause of liberty and union during the late war against 
rebellion." 

Action upon article thirty-one was indefinitely postponed. 
Upon article thirty-two, it was "voted that the sum of five thou- 
sand dollars be appropriated by the Town for a suitable monu- 
ment, to be erected to the memory of the soldiers and sailors, 
who during the rebellion, representing the Town of Hingham, 
died in the service of their country ; and that the matter be 
placed in the hands of a committee, consisting of E. Waters 
Burr, Amasa Whiting. John K. Corthell, John Todd, Samuel J. 
Henderson, William J. Nelson, William Thomas, Elijah Shute, 
and John Gushing, with power to procure a design, contract for 
the Monument, locate, and, when finished, to cause the same to 
be dedicated with appropriate ceremonies. 

Voted, That, in addition to the sum appropriated by the Town, 
the citizens be requested to subscribe and give the sum of one 
dollar each, and the children ten cents each, that all may con- 
tribute to so noble a cause. 

Voted, That the Committee cause the names of all the sol- 
diers and sailors representing the Town who died or were slain 
during the rebellion, also those who in the service of other 
towns, but natives of Hingham, died in the service, to be 
engraved on the Monument ; and, should the Committee deem it 
expedient, to inscribe thereon the names of all natives of 
Hingham who died in the service of their country during any 
former wars. 

Voted, That the names of the officers and members of the 
Lincoln Light Lifantry who answered the first call for troops, in 
April, 1 86 1, the names of all soldiers and sailors who repre- 
sented the town during the rebellion, the names of the Com- 



THE MONUMENT. 21 

mittee chosen to cause the Monument to be erected, and of 
the citizens and children who make donations to this object, be 
engrossed on parchment by the Town clerk, and that the same 
be placed in or under the corner-stone." 

The Committee began at once the work assigned them. Mr. 
John M. Corbett was invited to meet with them, and to act as 
secretary. Having organized, and appointed sub-committees, 
they held frequent meetings for the purpose of completing the 
business they were chosen to accomplish. 

In addition to the five thousand dollars appropriated by the 
Town, the sum of eight hundred and eighty-one dollars and forty- 
four cents was subscribed, in accordance with the preceding 
vote, by the citizens and children. A complete list of the sub- 
scribers appears in the appendix. 

It only remains here to insert a copy of the agreement made 
between the Committee, and the Proprietors of the Hingham 
Cemetery, as an accessible and convenient source of information. 

INDENTURE. 

This Indenture made and executed this eleventh day of April, A. D. 
eighteen hundred and seventy, by and between the Town of Hingham and 
the " Proprietors of the Hinghaai Cemetery," 

Witnesseth, That whereas the said Town, at a meeting held on the eighth 
day of March, A. D. eighteen hundred and sixty-nine, voted to erect a suit- 
able monument " to the memory of the soldiers and sailors who, during the 
late rebellion, representing the Town of Hingham, died in the service of 
their country," and did place the matter in the hands of a committee then 
chosen, which said committee, acting for and in behalf of the Town, have 
procured a monument, and have decided what names and inscriptions shall 
be placed thereon, aiid have determined to place and erect the same within 
the grounds of said cemetery, on the lot and upon the terms hereinafter 
described and set forth ; and whereas the said Proprietors, in consideration 
thereof, have agreed to furnish said lot upon which said Town may erect and 
maintain said monument upon the terms aforesaid ; 

Now, in consideration aforesaid, it is hereby mutually agreed by and be- 
tween the parties hereto as follows, to wit : — 

First, That the said Proprietors shall, and they do hereby, grant to the 
said Town, upon the terms and stipulations hereinafter set forth, the right 
to erect and to forever maintain said monument on the following described lot 
within their cemetery : to wit, an irregular lot situated on the summit of that 
part of their cemetery which was purchased of Atherton Tilden, by Adam 



22 BINGHAM IN THE CIVIL WAR. 

Wallace Thaxter, and presented to said Proprietors, and which said lot con- 
tains about twenty-five rods, and is entirely surrounded by a road or avenue, 
and lies about ninety-three feet north of land late of said Tilden, and now of 
Albert Fearing, and about one hundred and fifteen feet west of land now or 
late of Hannah Hinckley; — 

Second, That said Town shall place and erect said monument, so procured 
as aforesaid, on said lot, upon a suitable and proper foundation, and shall 
properl}' grade off the grounds in said lot during the present year, and shall 
always keep and maintain said monument and the foundation thereof on said 
lot in good repair and condition, and all at its own expense ; but said Town 
shall never be called upon to contribute any thing towards the care or im- 
provement of the grounds in said lot after they shall have been graded off as 
aforesaid. 

Third, While said monument remains upon said lot, no part thereof shall 
be appropriated or used for any other purpose whatsoever; but if, from any 
cause, said monument shall be destroved or cease to be maintained on said 
lot, then the rights of the Town in said lot shall terminate, and this agree- 
ment be at an end. 

Fouj-th, The said " Proprietors " shall have and retain the entire control 
of said lot, and of the care and management thereof ; and no alteration, im- 
provement, or embellishment thereof shall be made, except with their assent 
and under their direction, and they shall always keep the grounds in said lot in 
a neat and orderly condition, without any cost or charge to the Town. In 
testimony whereof, the said parties have caused this instrument to be signed, 
— the said "Proprietors" by Daniel Bassett and Enos Loring, a committee 
thereto duly authorized, and the said Town by the said committee so chosen 
as aforesaid the day and year first above written. 

The Proprietors of the Hingham Cemetery, by 

Daniel Bassett, 
Exos Loring, 



Committee. 



The Town of Hixgham, by 



E. Waters Burr, 
Amasa Whiting. 
John K. Corthell, 
John Todd, 



Town 



S. J. Henderson, -[ Committee 
Wm. J. Nelson, ' of nine. 

Wm. Thomas, 
Elijah Shute, 
John Gushing, 

From the Transactions of the Committee, as recorded by their 
secretary, we make the following extracts relating to the prelim- 
inary arrangements for the dedication of the Monument. 



THE MONUMENT. 23 

May 9, 1870. — A communication from Hon. Solomon Lincoln 
was laid before the Committee, accepting their invitation to 
deliver the address. 

At the same meeting Col. Hawkes Fearing was chosen to act 
as chief marshal on the day of the celebration. Mr. E. Waters 
Burr, the chairman of the Committee, being absent, Mr. John 
Cushing was chosen chairman /r^ tern. 

May 16. — The committee voted, "That the Monument be 
dedicated on the 17th of June next." They subsequently 
appointed Hon. Albert Fearing, President of the Day, and Rev. 
Calvin Lincoln, Chaplain. 

ywie 15. — At a meeting of the Committee held on the Mon- 
ument lot, it was " voted, that the Monument be accepted, and 
that the thanks of the Committee be presented by the acting 
chairman, to Mr. F. J. Fuller of Ouincy, the architect and 
builder, for the very satisfactory manner in which the work had 
been performed." This vote being communicated to Mr. Fuller, 
he replied briefly, thanking the Committee for the compliment 
paid him, and expressing great pleasure that his work so fully 
met their approbation. 

Printed notices relating to the exercises for the dedication of 
the Monument were issued as follows : — 

CHIEF MARSHAL'S NOTICE. 



ORDER OF PROCESSION AT THE DEDICATION OF THE 
SOLDIERS' AND SAILORS' MONUMENT, 

Erected by the Town of Hingham, June 17, 1S70. 



Police. 
A detachment. of the constabulary force of Hingham, under the direction of 

Constable Charles Spring. 
Military escort, 
consisting of 
Weymouth Brass Band ; 
A battalion composed of Co. D, First Regiment and Co. I, Seventh Regi- 
ment, M. V. M., Major Chaiies E. Spaulding, commanding, 
accompanied by Drum Corps of Seventh Regiment. 
Aid. Chief Marshal. Aid. 



24 



H INCH AM IN THE CIVIL WAR. 



FIRST DIVISION. 



Aid. 



A id. 



Marshal. 



Marshal. 



Marshal. 



Marshal. 



Division marshal. 

Hingham Brass Band. 

Chairman of Monumental Committee, president, orator, and chaplain of 

the day. 
Selectmen of Hingham. 

Invited guests. 

Clergymen of Hingham. 

Town clerk, treasurer, and school committee. 

Other Town officers. 

Officei's of the Hingham Cemetery Corporation. 

Officers of the Hingham Agricultural and Horticultural Society. 

Marshal. Trustees of Derby Academy. Marshal. 

Trustees of the Hingham Public Library. 
President, directors, and secretary of the Hingham Mutual Fire Insurance 

Company. 

President, trustees, and treasurer of the Hingham Institution for Savings. 

President, directors, and cashier of the Hingham National Bank. 

Old Colony Lodge of F. & A. M. 

Board of fire-wards. 

Marshal. Fire companies. Marshal. 

I ; Torrent No. 2; Niagara No. 3; Constitution No. 4. 

Citizens on foot. 



Extinguisher No. 



SECOND DIVISION. 

Aid. Division marshal. Aid. 

South Hingham Cornet Band. 
Marshal. Edwin Humphrey Post, No. 104, G. A. R. Marshal. 

Lincoln Post, No. 40, G. A. R. 
, Reynolds Post, No. 58, G. A. R. 
Marshal. McPherson Post, No. 73, G. A. R. Marshal. 

Hartsuff Post, No. 74, G. A. R. 

Paul Revere Post, No. 88, G. A. R. 

Gen. Charles Griffin Post, No. 112, G. A. R. 

Commander and Staff ,of the Department of Mass., G. A. R. 

Marshal. Orphans of deceased soldiers. . Marshal. 



THIRD DIVISION. 

Aid. Division marshal. Aid. 

Marshal. Pupils of the public schools, in carriages, in Marshal. 

charge of their respective teachers. 

Teachers and pupils of private schools. 

Teachers and pupils of Derby Academy. 
Marshal. Citizens in carriages. Marshal. 



THE MONUMENT. 25 

The Monumental Committee, president, orator, chaplain, selectmen of 
Hingham, invited guests, and clergymen of the Town, are invited to assemble 
at Room No. 2, Public Library Building, at i^ o'clock, p.m.; and all other 
bodies designated as a part of the first division are requested to meet at 
Niagara Hall, at the same hour, where marshals will be in attendance to 
impart all needful information. 

The procession will form at \\ o'clock, p.m., on the Green near the Public 
Library, — the escort on Short Street; the first division on School Street; 
the second division within the Square ; the third division on Middle Street, 
right resting on the Avenue extending from Middle to School Street ; and 
will move by the following route : up Middle to Pleasant, Main, and Leavitt 
Streets to Agricultural Hall, where an address will be delivered by Hon. 
Solomon Lincoln, and other appropriate exercises will be held ; after which 
the procession will re-form, passing over Leavitt, Main, and South Streets, 
to the main entrance of Hingham Cemetery, thence to the Monumental 
Grounds, where exercises will be held pertaining to the formal transfer of 
the Monument by the Committee, and the acceptance of the same in behalf 
of the Town by the selectmen. 

Marshals of the several organizations are requested to report to the chiefs 
of their respective divisions at the earliest practicable moment, in order to 
facilitate a prompt formation of the procession. 

Assistant marshals not specially detailed will report for duty at 9 o'clock, 
A.M., at the chief marshal's headquarters, on Main Street, opposite Short 
Street. 

The following named gentlemen are appointed assistant marshals ; viz., 
Theophilus Kilby, Josiah M. Lane, William Gushing, David Gushing, jun., 
Levi B. Ripley, Wilham H. Leavitt, Wallace Corthell, John Stephenson, 
Arthur A. Burr, Thos. J. Leavitt, Marcellus C. Cloudman, Thos. Stephenson, 
Benjamin F. Meservey, Jos. Ripley, Eleazer P. Dunbar, Lyman B. Whiton, 
Luther Stephenson, jun., Henry F. Siders, George E. Siders, Charles F. 
Whiton, Joseph B. Thaxter, Benjamin Andrews, Frank W. Hatch, Thomas 
Weston, Edmund Hersey, 2d, Hosea B. Hersey, Webster Hersey, E. S. 
Tirrell, Thomas Humphrey, Daniel Perkins, Francis M. Stowell, Joseph A. 
Newhall, Simeon J. Dunbar, Caleb G. Beal, H. Burr Crandall, Edward T. 
Bouve, Albert Leavitt, and E. T. C. Stephenson. 

Luther Stephenson, jun., Benjamin F. Meservey, and Simeon J. Dunbar, 
are designated as chiefs of divisions, first, second, and third, respectively, and 
will be respected accordingly. 

Aids to the chief marshal, John C. Whiton and John C. Hollis. 

The following are assigned for special duty, — 

I. Marshal Levi B. Ripley, assisted by Marshal Marcellus C. Cloudman, 
is charged with the execution of that part of the. programme pertaining to 
the national salutes. He will procure transportation for the guns, provide 
rations and furnish quarters for the gunners, and, on the receipt of this, will 
report for instructions. 
4 



26 HINGHAM IN THE CIVIL WAR. 

2. The arrangement of carriages on the Agricultural Grounds will be 
under the direction of Marshal John Stephenson. 

3. Marshals Jos. Ripley, Wallace Corthell, Thos. Stephenson, Wm. Gush- 
ing, Francis M. Stowell, Frank W. Hatch, Webster Hersey, and Thos. 
Humphrey, will be in attendance at Agricultural Hall, to receive and assist 
in seating the procession. 

4. Marshals Theophilus Kilby, E. T. C. Stephenson, Josiah M. Lane, 
Ghas. F. Whiton, Arthur A. Burr, and Henry F. Siders, are assigned to duty 
at Public Library Building. 

5. Marshals Lyman B. Whiton, Thos. J. Leavitt, E. S. Tirrell, Albert 

Leavitt, Hosea B. Hersey, and Wm. H. Leavitt, are detailed for duty at 

Niagara Hall. 

Hawkes Fearing, Chief Marshal. 



"o 



ORDER OF NOTICE. 

The day will open with firing a national salute on Liberty Pole Hill at 
sunrise, at Hingham Gentre at noon, and at Broad Bridge at sundown. 

Goncert by the South Hingham Goniet Band, at 8 o'clock, A. M., at 
Fountain Square; and also by the Hingham Brass Band, at the same 
hour, at South Hingham. 

Reception of the various Posts of the G.A.R. by detachments of Post 104. 

Dress parade by the military on Broad Bridge, at \o\, a.m. 

Review of the military and Grand Army of the Republic, on the Gommon 
at Hingham Gentre, at 11 o'clock, a.m. 

Military and G. A. R. will partake of a collation at Agricultural Hall, at 12 
o'clock, M. 

At I o'clock, P.M., the services at the hall will consist first of prayer and 
singing, after which the audience will listen to an address by Hon. Solomon 
Lincoln. The singing during the day will be under the direction of Mr. E. 
B. Whitcomb of South Hingham, and original hymns are expected by 
Hingham poets for the occasion. After the services at the hall have been 
completed, the procession will form, and march to the Hingham Gemetery, 
where services appropriate to the occasion will be held. 

It is expected the Monument will be tastefully decorated with flowers and 
bunting by John Todd, Esq., whose artistic skill the people of Hingham 
have so often witnessed. During the unveiling of the Monument, minute 
guns will be fired from Gobb's Hill. A number of young ladies, correspond- 
ing to the number of names upon the Monument, will pay their tribute of 
respect to the memory of the fallen, by each placing a bouquet of flowers at 
the base of the Monument. It is intended to make the whole service 
pleasant and impressive, and one that will be remembered by the youth. 

The citizens of Hingham generally are requested to lay aside their com- 
mon avocations, and join in rendering this memorial to the fallen one of 
interest and profit. 

John Gushing, Chairman pro tevt. 



THE MONUMENT. 2/ 

Friday, the 17th of June, was a day to be remembered in the 
annals of Hingham. Although the morning was cloudy, and 
rain fell in showers during a portion of the afternoon, yet the 
weather was not unfavorable for the celebration. The tempera- 
ture was comfortable, the streets were free from dust, and the rain 
did not descend till the exercises were far advanced. 

The bells on the various meeting-houses were rung at sunrise; 
and salutes were fired at morning, noon, and night, in accordance 
with the preceding order of notice, the services of a detach- 
ment from the Second Battery Light Artillery, M. V., having 
been secured for the occasion. 

At eight o'clock, a.m., the South Hingham Cornet Band gave 
an open-air concert at Fountain Square, and at the same hour 
the Hingham Brass Band furnished a musical entertainment to 
the people of the south part of the town. 

Throughout the day the Town presented a lively and festive 
appearance. Business generally was suspended, and the streets 
were thronged with people. Many residents of the adjoining 
towns, and a large number of military guests from other places, 
were present ; and the whole morning teemed with music, miHtary 
evolutions, marching, and counter-marching. 

The chief interest of the day centered of course in the pro- 
cession, which in length, character, and brilliancy, was probably 
never surpassed in this Town upon any occasion. It began to 
move over the route prescribed by the chief marshal at about 
two o'clock, P.M., and proceeded to Agricultural Hall. After the 
large audience was seated, the president of the day, Hon. Albert 
Fearing, arose, and welcomed the assemblage in a few well 
chosen words. The South Hingham Cornet Band followed with 
a voluntary. Prayer was then offered by the chaplain of the 
day, Rev. Calvin Lincoln, of the First Parish. 

The following ode, written for the occasion by James Hum- 
phrey Wilder, and read by Rev. Henry W. Jones, pastor of the 
Orthodox Congregational Society, was then sung by a select 
choir, conducted by Mr. E. Barker Whitcomb. 



28 HINGHAM IN THE CIVIL WAR. 



Air — " Star Spangled Banner^ 

Glory, glory to God for the fathers of old, 

A home on these shores for sweet Freedom who founded, — 
Who to battle with famine and foemen were bold, 

While that home with stanch bulwarks they bravely surrounded. 
And the tree planted here, 
Nursed by storms wild and drear, 
Is now spreading its branches all nations to cheer. 
Oh ! their memory shall live, their names ever be bright, 
For the earth and the heavens in their praise will unite. 

And honored be they, worthy sons of stern sires, 

Who, linked heart and hand in resistless communion, 
Declared Freedom their birthright, and lighted the fires 
That should weld North and South in a glorious Union. 
Then bright to the world 
The dear flag was unfurled, 
'Neath whose stars to the dust old Oppression was hurled. 
Oh ! their memory shall live, their names ever be bright, 
For the earth and the heavens in their praise will unite. 

Dark, dark, was the day, sad and fearful the sight. 

When traitors to nought these rich blessings would trample ; 
When they madly and blindly, with infamous fight, 

Strove to blot from its view the world's peerless example. 
And all shrouded in gloom. 
Stood a shadowy tomb. 
Though for Liberty meant, it was Slavery's doom. 
Ah ! their memory is pain, and their names dark as night, 
And the heavens with the earth in their shame must unite. 

Glory, glory to God for the brave hearts and true, 
Who sprang to the rescue when peril impended ; 
Ay, who counted not life dear such foes to subdue, 
And gallantly Freedom and Union defended. 
And the laurels they won, 
As the ages roll on. 
Ever greener shall grow, — till the last setting sun ; 
And their memory shall live, and their names shall be bright, 
For the earth and the heavens in their praise shall unite. 



THE MONUMENT. 20 

Now, all honor to them, the young heroes our own. 

Who left their loved homes, to return, alas ! never ; 
Who, forgetting themselves, thought of country alone, 
And died that their land might be Freedom's forever. 
While the world shall endure, 
Their glory is sure. 
More lasting than granite, no crystal more pure ; 
And their memory shall live, and their names shall be bright, 
For the earth and the heavens in their praise shall unite. 



The address was then delivered by Hon. Solomon Lincoln. 



ADDRESS 



DELIVERED AT THE DEDICATION OF THE 



Soldiers' and Sailors' Monument in Hingham, 



June 17, 1870, 



By SOLOMON LINCOLN. 



ADDRESS. 



Friends and Fellow-Citizens, — We have assembled to-day 
with mingled emotions of sorrow and joy, — sorrow for the 
patriot dead who gave their lives to their country, and joy in the 
triumph of the cause for which they fought. 

This is a historic day. It is the anniversary of the first great 
battle for freedom which electrified a continent, and was felt 
throughout the civilized world. That was one of the series of 
great actions which culminated in the Declaration of Independ- 
ence, — that noble instrument, written in words of immortal truth 
by Thomas Jefferson, and defended on the floor of Congress and 
before the world by the matchless eloquence of John Adams ; 
Virginia and Massachusetts uniting in laying deep and strong 
the foundation of our great temple of freedom, which has now 
withstood the assaults of foes within and foes without for nearly 
a century. The heroes of the Revolution cemented the union 
of these States with their blood. 

Every section, every State, every village, sent its quota of brave 
men to maintain the rights which were claimed by the people 
for themselves and their posterity. In the providence of God, 
victory crowned their noble sacrifices, and the United States 
achieved an independent rank among the nations of the earth. 

The traditions, the history, of this day are all on the side of 
freedom. It is a glorious and immortal day. 

We have assembled to do honor to the brave men who, inspired 
with the spirit of the Revolution, and animated by the sentiment 



34 HINGHAM IN THE CIVIL WAR. 

of American Independence, rallied around the flag of their 
country to defend it from the treasonable attacks of a gigantic 
rebellion. The power of the people was equal to the emergency. 
Their patriotism rose with every fresh demand upon it. Defeat 
could not subdue it, treason could not destroy it. Victory only 
stimulated to higher effort. Our fair fabric of freedom was pre- 
served. It stood, and will stand we trust forever, in greater 
strength and with increased beauty. 

But, fellow-citizens, we are painfully sensible, on this day, of 
the sacrifices which were made to obtain that great result. We 
know too well the blood and treasure which were poured out like 
water to maintain the glorious institutions which our fathers 
gave their blood and treasure to establish. 

We cannot look around us, and not perceive in the tears of 
sympathy for the noble dead, the terrible losses which this and 
every other village of our land have suffered by the parricidal 
attempt to overthrow the Union and Constitution, which are so 
dear to us all. 

The causes of the rebellion are matters of history. States- 
men have discussed them. The highest powers of eloquence 
were exerted in the councils of the nation, and before the people, 
to check and control the operation of those causes. But in vain. 
The mistaken confidence of politicians in their ability to effect a 
peaceable separation of the States of the Union, and thus gratify 
the pride and establish the power of sectional ambition, so soon 
as it was developed in action, and sounded the first gun of 
rebellion in the harbor of Charleston, revealed the might that 
slumbered in the arms of freemen and the weakness of their foes. 
A thrill of patriotic enthusiasm ran through the free North and 
West. Citizens of all ranks and parties rallied with Revolution- 
ary ardor around the flag of their country, to defend the fortresses 
and Capitol of the Union. Armies sprang into existence as if 
by magic. Forces, such as had not been seen in modern times, 



THE MONUMENT. 



35 



were organized under the lead of gallant chiefs, and marched to 
the battle-field to defend what they felt to be truth, freedom, 
right. I saw much of these exciting scenes. But no poor words 
of mine can describe them. My voice is powerless to utter fit- 
ting terms of eulogy, the majesty of the popular uprising. I 
felt it all. And it wns then, and is now, a source to my mind of 
the proudest satisfaction, that I saw among those military corps 
who earliest left home and families, with wives and children, a 
gallant company from my native town, bearing an honored Revo- 
lutionary name, threading their way by tap of drum through the 
crowded streets of the metropolis to the State House, there to 
receive the outfit which a spirit of prophecy had prompted an 
ever vigilant and patriotic governor to have in preparation for 
them, and that I had the privilege of standing by his side, and to 
listen to his farewell words to one regiment, uttered with all that 
simplicity, tenderness, fervor, and beauty which seemed like the 
words of inspiration to all who heard them. 

The scenes- of the war, the actors in those scenes, the mighty 
armies which sprang from the people, and whom the people 
honored and sustained, the gatherings of the women of the land 
to provide every thing which thoughtful kindness could suggest 
for the comfort of those who were dear to them, the profuse lib- 
erality of men of wealth, the large contributions of those of 
more moderate means, the patriotic action of the governments 
of States and Nation to give energy and power to the popular 
will, — all these subjects have passed into history, and fill the 
brightest pages of our public annals. 

Glorious scenes, glorious men ! noble efforts in the cause of 
humanity and freedom ! They five in our memories, and sink 
deep into our hearts. 

It would be to me a gratifying service, if I could narrate, even 
in a summary manner, the events of the war, the parts which 
were performed by brave men upon the land and the sea, and 



36 HINGHAM IN THE CIVIL WAR. 

especially those which we associate with our native Town, where 
both authorities and citizens worked in harmonious action to 
leave no duty undone which patriotism called on them to do ; 
but the mass of facts which press upon the memory on this 
occasion almost bewilders the imagination, and must be dealt 
with in a more careful and deliberate manner by the historian. It 
would be a very desirable work to be accomplished, if a special 
account of the services of each officer and soldier and sailor, 
natives of this town, as forming a part of its quota, could be pre- 
pared for the gratification of the living and the instruction of 
posterity. Our indefatigable Town clerk has many of the facts, 
systematically arranged, which would be necessary to effect such 
an object. The narration of the services and sacrifices and bril- 
liant achievements of men of Hingham, in the army and navy, 
written with exact truth, taste, and discrimination, would make a 
volume of surpassing interest to relatives, friends, and to all 
classes of citizens.^ A collection of such volumes from all parts 
of the country, and giving to each its distinctive claims to public 
gratitude, would compose an extensive national library, unexam- 
pled in the history of literature. Much of this work has been 
done ; and the histories of regiments, corps, expeditions, and of 
the war generally, which have been prepared with great labor and 
expense, are but beginnings of what remains to be accomplished. 

By the aid of the printing-press, a monument may be con- 
structed which will be more durable than bronze or granite or 
marble. 

But perhaps the time may not have arrived for the preparation 
of such works in the most satisfactory manner. For it is true 
that for an impartial, philosophical, instructive history of events 
of deepest interest to the human race, time is necessary to 
soften asperities, to remove prejudices, and to do justice to all 
parties and all sections of the country. 

1 This volume is intended to supply the want above described. 



THE MONUMENT. 37 

During the war of the rebellion, as may be inferred from 
what I have already said, this Town furnished its full quota of 
several hundred men. 

The whole number of men called into service during the war 
was 2,656,553. Of these 1,490,000 were in actual service ; of 
this number nearly 60,000 were killed on the field, and about 
35,000 were mortally wounded. Disease in camps and hospitals 
slew 184,000. It is estimated that at least 300,000 Union soldiers 
perished during the war. Full that number of Confederate 
soldiers lost their lives ; and the aggregate number of men, includ- 
ing both armies, who were crippled or permanently disabled by 
disease, was estimated at 400,000. The actual loss to the coun- 
try of able-bodied men, in consequence of the rebellion, was 
full 1,000,000. 

But notwithstanding these painful facts, carrying sorrow and 
calamity into so many families, and cutting down the flower of 
the young men of the land, we are permitted to rejoice in the 
success of the great struggle for which they gave their lives to 
their country. In the providence of God, the great cause of the 
rebellion was irrevocably' removed, and every inhabitant of 
the land thus redeemed can enjoy the pure air of freedom. Our 
martyred president seemed to have been an instrument in the 
hands of the Almighty to purify this nation, and by his emanci- 
pation proclamation to breathe into it the breath of life, and to 
stamp his own with immortality. 

The number of soldiers and sailors, natives or residents of this 
Town, or who formed a part of its quota, whose lives were sacri- 
ficed in consequence of the rebellion, was eighty. Of these 
many were slain on the field of battle, and were buried where 
they fell. Others died from wounds or disease ; and to some it 
was the hard fate to perish in the prisons of Salisbury, Belle 
Isle, and Andersonville. Besides these, were those who survived 
the fields of battle, and who bear the marks of wounds received 



38 HINGHAM IN THE CIVIL WAR. 

in the service of their country. Many of the dead have been 
buried in the cemeteries of this Town, where the hand of friend- 
ship has had the privilege of placing appropriate memorial stones 
to designate the places of their interment. But a few days since 
the beautiful service was performed of decorating their burial 
places with flowers. This form of remembrance of the fallen 
heroes was a fresh expression of affection and gratitude, honora- 
ble to the living and to the dead. It touched the sympathies of 
the young as well as the old, and taught in the language of nature 
the duty of cherishing the highest sentiments of an enlightened 
patriotism and a profound homage for the nation's benefactors. 
But this affecting service addressed itself to the living, while it 
brought to mind those equally dear to us all, whose remains 
repose in unknown graves on the fields where they fell. 

Influenced by the sentiment that a permanent form of record 
of the names of all our heroes wherever they died, and wherever 
buried, would speak to posterity in language not to be mistaken, 
this Town, acting in its corporate capacity, with many of its 
inhabitants acting upon the most generous impulses, have caused 
the erection of a monument of granite, in one of our ancient 
cemeteries, in a conspicuous position, where its mute eloquence 
will address future ages, and commend the example of those 
whose names are inscribed upon it to succeeding generations. 
Thus may they be taught, by a perpetual remembrance, to appre- 
ciate the services and sacrifices of the gallant men whose lives 
were laid upon the altar of our Union, that they might transmit 
to posterity, a happy, united, and free country. 

I have said that this is a historic day. The erection of the 
Monument to the memory of our soldiers and sailors in the 
place where it stands, has an appropriateness which harmonizes 
well with our local historical associations. It stands amid the 
graves of our ancestors, the first settlers of the Town, whose 
valor was displayed at an early date in our history, in defending 



THE MONUMENT. 



39 



our infant settlement from hostile attacks. The men who, in 
Provincial times, united with the forces of the mother country to 
repel the incursions of the French, repose almost beneath its 
shadow. The heroes and patriots of the Revolution, in con- 
siderable numbers, found their final resting-place within its 
limits. That distinguished general whose name is conspicuous 
in our annals, and who merited and enjoyed the confidence of 
Washington, rests in this consecrated ground. The elegant yet 
simple and appropriate monument over his remains, speaks no 
word of eulogy. But Revolutionary services, his history and his 
life, are his highest eulogy. There, also, are the graves of many 
who bore arms in the war of 1 812, by some called our second 
war of Independence. 

The names of many of those whom we this day commemorate, 
are to be found upon the memorials which friendship has placed 
to designate their burial places, within the limits of the ceme- 
tery, and in view of the noble Monument upon which we have 
sought to hand them down to posterity, with those of the noble 
army of martyrs who perished with them. 

It stands near the grave of the great governor, whose mortal 
remains are at rest in the soil of the town which he loved so 
well, — he whose whole soul and thought was bestowed upon 
his country, who blended the brilliant talent of a statesman with 
the lofty sentiment of a patriot and the true honor of a man. 
As we read the names upon the Monument, our eyes will turn 
upon the grave of him whose warm heart inspired them to deeds 
of valor, and who so tenderly cared for the dead heroes who fell 
victims as the first martyrs in the rebellion. His own life 
was given to his country, as truly as the soldier's who fell upon 
the field of battle ; and his monument, we trust, will yet rise in 
simple beauty, to designate the grave of one whose history is so 
intimately associated with that of our own Town, our beloved 
Commonwealth, and of the United States. 



40 HINGHAM IN THE CIVIL WAR. 

I have said that this was a day of sorrow as well as of joy. 
The thoughts which I have expressed, indicate how deeply many 
hearts will be affected on this occasion. Our sympathies are 
with them. And the lesson of the hour teaches us all how ten- 
derly every honorable effort should be made to alleviate the 
burthens which their sacrifices have brought upon them. We 
have also living heroes to remember, as well as the dead to com- 
memorate. The flowers of yesterday were for the living, — the 
Monument of to-day is for posterity. Hereafter gratitude will 
remember both ; and when, hereafter, we shall with increased 
interest scatter beautiful flowers upon the graves of the dead, 
shall we not take care that the graceful Monument which we 
this day dedicate to our fallen heroes shall be hung with garlands 
and wreaths of immortelles. 

The ancient Greeks decorated the graves of their illustrious 
heroes with fresh flowers, and also called into requisition the 
highest talent of the sculptor and the artisan to rear permanent 
statues and monuments to their memory. We imitate the cus- 
toms of antiquity, not on account of their origin in nations of an 
advanced civilization and refinement, but because they spring 
from the highest impulses of our nature, and are the natural 
expression of humanity and patriotism. 

The service, therefore, which we perform to-day, is done with 
joy and not with grief We rise above the depressing thoughts 
which would invest our solemnities with gloom and despondency, 
and read in the glorious events which crowd upon our memories, 
and elevate our feelings, the brightest hopes for the future of 
our country. We rejoice in the victory over rebellion, chasten- 
ing our joy by subduing every emotion of sectional pride or 
ambition, and glorying in the triumph riot for the North alone, 
not for the West, but for the South as well, and for freedom and 
humanity to all. 

While, therefore, we devote this day to commemorate the 



THE MONUMENT. ^I 

patriot dead, we will rejoice that our country is free, that the 
Union is preserved, that our institutions are safe, that time, the 
great arbiter, will heal all animosities, and conquer all prejudices, 
that justice will reign, that the rights of every citizen will be 
secured, and that amid the trials and perplexities consequent 
upon a state of civil war, the nation will rise above all adverse 
influences, and animated by a spirit of patriotism, the love of 
freedom, and a just regard for the rights of every citizen, will 
commence a new career of true glory and renown. 

The monuments which we raise in honor of the dead, shall 
remind the, living of their duty to themselves, to their country, 
and to posterity. 

Our excellent governor recently stated that " the Legislature 
has but carried out the will of the people in renewing for three 
years the State Aid law, which is so beneficial in assisting the 
needy families, and those whose service in the war has left them 
feeble and dependent" And he adds, "It is to the honor of our 
good old Commonwealth that she provides far more abundantly 
for those stricken ones than any other State in the Union. 

This is indeed a proud record for Massachusetts. It shows 
that the people are true to the principles of the founders of the 
Republic, that ingratitude to public benefactors is not a stain 
upon their patriotism, and that, whether in prosperity or adver- 
sity, the true glory of the State is the object, as it is the reward, 
of the highest sentiments of patriotism. 

Let us go hence, then, with hearts animated and refreshed by 
these reflections upon our national and local history, to the con- 
secrated spot so rich in ancestral associations, with the young 
and old, the soldier and the citizen ; to dedicate the graceful 
Monument erected in honor of our fallen heroes, by the solemn 
anthem, the devout prayer, with poetry and music, amid the rich 
foliage and beautiful flowers of summer, m the cause of patriot- 
ism, philanthropy, freedom, truth. 

6 



42 HINGHAM IN THE CIVIL WAR. 

At the close of the Address, the following ode, composed for 
the occasion by Miss Almira Seymour, was read by Rev. Jona- 
than Tilson, of the Baptist Society, and sung by the choir to the 
tune, " America." 

Darkness o'er all the land, 

An outstretched, red right-hand 

Menaced the blow, 
A'nation's life the aim; 
- Surrender all but name ! 
From Massachusetts came 

The first firm No ! 

A voice from Sumter spoke : 
From desk and workshop broke 

Our young and brave ; 
The darkened air flushed bright 
With freedom's symbol-light. 
As forward in their might 

They rushed to save. 

Forward ! o'er fortress bound. 
Forward ! o'er leagues of ground, 

O'er surging wave ; 
Through wilderness and fen. 
Through Hunger's ghastly den — 
Repulsed — forward again 

They rushed to save. 

They fought, they fell, they saved ! 
Deep be their names engraved 

On changeless stone ; 
Names lettered now in light. 
Truth's monogram of might, 
With theirs who fell for right 

In years far-flown. 

Baptized in infancy 

With life-blood of the free, 

O holy land ! 
Confirmed in manhood's prime 
By the same rite sublime. 
To higher heights yet climb, 

Led by God's hand. 



THE MONUMENT. 43 

Our Country — with acclaim 
Shout, coupling each loved name — 

Our Country /"r^(? / 
From Gulf to Arctic shore, 
Ocean's to ocean's roar, 
Union forevermore 

In Liberty! 

The services at the hall were closed with a benediction by 
the chaplain. 

After the procession was re-formed, it proceeded to the Hing- 
ham Cemetery. A platform, tastefully decorated with flags and 
flowers, had been erected a few yards west of the Monument, 
upon which the gentlemen having the services in charge were 
seated. 

The Monument itself presented a most attractive appearance. 
Running evergreen encircled the entire shaft, and the die was 
covered with a large American ensign to veil it. When all was 
in readiness, the exercises were introduced with a musical per- 
formance by the five bands consolidated. 

The president of the day then arose in his place, and 
addressed the large assemblage as follows : — 

Beneath these over-arching heavens, with the sun partially veiled, and the 
clouds dropping tears of sympathy with the scene, and surrounded by 
ancestral graves, and Monuments of distinguished men, we meet to dedicate 
this imposing monument, erected by the citizens of Hingham to the memory 
of the heroes, who, in the late contest, gave up their lives in defence of the 
Constitution, and to sustain the integrity of the Union. It would be an 
agreeable privilege to speak of the virtues and patriotic sacrifices of the men 
whose names are inscribed upon this Monument ; but this duty was appropri- 
ately assigned to a distinguished citizen, and most eloquently has it been 
discharged. 

In paying this grateful tribute to the memory of the dead, let us not forget 
the living, whose amputated limbs and deep scars daily remind us of the 
magnitude of the conflict and the importance of the result. 

We cordially welcome to this occasion our young friends, who are so soon 
to fill the places we now occupy, and to reap all the blessings secured by 
the great struggle for liberty. We welcome, too, this band of citizen 
soldiers, representing that great and noble army, the pride and glory and 
safety of our country. No name is more honorable than that of a citizen 
soldier, ready to discharge all the duties of civil life, and as ready to take up 
arms to defend the country from foreign and domestic foes. Far distant be 



44 



HINGHAM IN THE CIVIL WAR. 



the day when they shall cease to be cherished and sustained ! Welcome, 
thrice welcome all to a participation in the services of this hour ! 

We taise this Monument in no vain-glorious spirit, nor in any disposition 
to exult over a fallen foe, but as the expression of our admiration for bravery, 
and our appreciation of the value of the services rendered by these men to 
our common country. 

And now that many of the causes of dissension have been removed, let us 
all unite in cultivating a spirit of charity and love between all sections of the 
country, and thus cement this Union of the States, and do what we can to 
make it perpetual. And may we not hope, that -long before the moss shall 
gather upon this beautiful Monument, and beneath the hand of time it shall 
crumble into fragments, wars and rumors of wars shall cease, and the influ- 
ence of the Prince of peace shall be felt in every land, and the people of 
every nation shall dwell together in harmony and love. 

Prayer was then offered by the chaplain ; after which the 
following original ode, composed for the occasion by Mrs. C. L. 
P. Stephenson, was sung by a choir of young ladies, to the tune, 
" Auld Lang Syne." 

We've whispered words of gratitude. 

Sweet memories told in flowers. 
And we have raised an obelisk, 

For fame in future hours. 
To the brave men who nobly fought 

Our Union to restore, 
Who died beneath the " Stars and Stripes," 

The heroes of our war. 

The sound of words will pass away. 

The fairest flowers will fade ; 
But long this work of art shall stand 

Within this sacred shade, 
To the brave men who nobly fought 

Our Union to restore. 
Who died beneath the " Stars and Stripes," 

The heroes of our war. 

Though some afar are sleeping still 

Beneath an humbler sod. 
They all will wake within the smile 

Of glory from their God, 
The noble men who bravely fought 

Our Union to restore. 
Who died beneath the " Stars and Stripes," 

The heroes of our war. 



THE MONUMENT. 45 

But while we give our absent friends 

The honor and the tear, 
We also fold within our hearts 

Their hero-comrades here ; 
For they were men who left their homes, 

And many burdens bore. 
Who fought to save the " Stars and Stripes," 

Brave heroes of our war. 

This granite pile will tell the tale 

Of martyrs now asleep. 
When we have left the ranks of time. 

And others vigil keep. 
'Twill t^ach to them the lesson true, 

Which we to-day should heed, — 
Each life iox freedom sacrificed 

Y ox future peace ^\SS. '^\t2A. 

While the youthful choir were singing, the flag which had 
veiled the Monument was removed, the detachment of artillery 
fired a series of minute guns from Ward Hill, and the base of 
the Monument was decorated with flowers by the hands of the 
children. 

Mr. John Gushing, acting chairman of the Committee, then 
presented the Monument to the Town authorities, with the 
following remarks : — 

Mr. President and Citizens of Hingham, — I stand before you to- 
day to perform a duty which I gladly would have avoided. Our worthy 
chairman, whose voice should have cheered us here to-day, is seeking for 
health on the Pacific Coast. His untiring industry to see this work com- 
pleted entitles him to our gratitude and esteem. My prayer is, and I doubt 
not it is the prayer of you all, that he may return in due time to his family 
and friends fully recruited in bodily strength and vigor. 

At a meeting of the legal voters of Hingham, held May 8, 1869, it was 
voted that the sum of five thousand dollars be appropriated towards building 
a Monument to the memory of the soldiers and sailors who died or were 
slain during the rebellion, and that a Committee of nine be appointed to 
cause the same to be erected, and when finished to be dedicated with 
appropriate ceremonies. 

The Committee having discharged the duty intrusted to them, it seems 



46 HINGHAM IN THE CIVIL WAR. 

fitting and proper at this time to give you a brief account of their doings, 
and of the motives which have actuated them in this sad but pleasant 
undertaking. 

In April, 1869, the Committee met for the first time at the residence of 
Mr. E. Waters Burr ; and, after organizing and choosing Mr. Burr as chair- 
man, we invited Mr. John M. Corbett as our secretary, which he cheerfully 
accepted, and the duty he has faithfully performed. 

Two questions naturally came before this meeting, viz., what shall be the 
design of the Monument ? and, second, where shall it be located ? I need 
not go into particulars in regard to the labor spent to procure a suitable 
design : suffice it to say, that the Committee contracted with Mr. F. J. Fuller 
of Quincy, to build and erect just such a monument as you see before you 
to-day; and it is for you, citizens of Hingham, to decide whether or not the 
Committee have met your expectations. Let me say, however, that the 
Committee have given it as their opinion that the work is done in a neat 
and workmanlike manner, and reflects great credit upon the character and 
capacity of the workman and the contractor. 

In locating this Monument, it is not to be supposed the Committee have 
met the expectations of you all. I think the Town never contemplated a 
union of feeling when they committed the whole subject to the hands of a 
committee, not only to erect, but to locate the Monument. The Com- 
mittee visited various localities which had been suggested as suitable places 
to erect a Monument ; but at last, after much deliberation, they decided 
unanimously that this was the most fitting and proper place the Town 
afforded for the location. It is certainly true that this spot has more than a 
common interest to all the citizens of Hingham. Here lie the remains of 
some of the first settlers. A monument to their memory was erected by 
the Town some years ago. Here on these grounds lie two distinguished 
patriots, — one of the revolution of 1775, the other of 1861. One fought to 
break the British yoke ; the other to break the yoke in our own country. 
We love to look at the marble slab that records the death of Major-Gen. 
Benjamin Lincoln, a great and good man, and one that served his country 
in an hour of peril and distress. 

We trust the day is not far distant when the lovers of impartial liberty 
will erect a monument to the memory of that other good and great man, 
John A. Andrew, who fell a sacrifice to the tyranny in our own country. 

I am told there are sixteen of the number of those whose names are on 
the Monument who lie interred in this place, two at Liberty Plain, two at 



THE MONUMENT. 47 

South Hingham, three at Centre Hingham, and five at Fort Hill. Most of 
the others lie in unknown graves upon Southern soil. What more fitting 
place, then, than this to erect a public Monument? Surely you would not 
consecrate your play-ground for an object so painful and sad. 

In this quiet retreat, away from the noise of the street, with the bay so 
finely in view, truly this place is one of rare beauty and fitness. In stand- 
ing on this spot the other day, I could not help thinking of the account in 
Maccabees, of Simon building a monument on the sepulchre of his father 
and his brethren who were slain by their enemy, Tryphon. On this monu- 
ment were ships carved, that they might be seen of all that sail on the sea. 

The practice of adorning the monuments of those slain in battle is noth- 
ing new, but was practised by the ancients to a much greater extent. The 
object was to inspire the living with resolution by commending the courage 
of the slain. We trust we have a higher and better purpose in view than to 
inspire merely physical courage and daring. It is gratitude for what they 
have done for us that moves our hearts to deeds of this kind. 

I trust we have come here to-day with no other feeling than thankfulness 
that our feet now stand on that everlasting rock of liberty and peace. 

Mr. Chairman of the Selectmen of Hingham, — This Monument 
we here dedicate to-day is cheerfully and trustingly committed to your 
charge, believing that the cause for which it was erected will forever be a 
guarantee that it will suffer no detriment from the idle and thoughtless, and 
that the ground will always be kept in such a condition that it will reflect 
honor to the Town, and to those who may come after us. 

This deed, which I present to you from the Committee in behalf of the 
proprietors of the Cemetery, conveys a certain irregular lot of land, giving 
the boundaries thereof in full. It was certainly an act of generosity on the 
part of the proprietors in relinquishing so valuable a spot of land gratuit- 
ously for the erection of this Monument. You will see that provision has 
been made for keeping the lot forever in a neat and proper manner, without 
any expense to the town. But, should the Monument be destroyed or 
removed for any cause, the land reverts back to the corporation. 

Henry Siders, Esq., chairman of the selectmen of Hingham, 
in behalf of the Town, received the Monument, and said, — 

This gathering before me is a testimony of the general interest which this 
occasion has awakened. This large concourse of people, with faces glowing 



48 HINGHAM IN THE CIVIL WAR. 

with sympathy and joy, proclaims that the day, the place, and the occasion 
have made a deep impression upon their hearts. 

We are standing among the resting-places of many of the fathers and 
mothers of this great company. We are standing near the remains of the 
lamented Gov. Andrew. Blessed spot! 

The object of the citizens of this ancient Town in erecting this Monument, 
is to show to the country their sense of the value and services of our fellow 
townsmen, who in our country's danger, at the firing of the first gun on 
Sumter, and at every call afterward, left their homes and families, and 
buckled on their armor, and -marched forth to meet the foe. To those whose 
names are inscribed upon that tablet is this Monument erected ; and long 
may it stand as a memorial to those brave men, who, in defending their 
country, sacrificed their lives ! 

And to you soldiers and sailors, who have been allowed to return to your 
friends, and whom we are happy to meet in this consecrated place to partake 
in the ceremony of dedicating this beautiful Monument, I extend a hearty 
welcome ; and may the same hand that led you through the late struggle be 
with you to the last ! 

Mr. Chairman of the Monument Committee, — As Chairman of the 
Selectmen of this Town, I would say, in receiving this Monument from you, 
that we cherish every memorial of those brave men. We admire their 
courage in their country's dangerous hour. May this Monument stand after 
you and I and this great company shall have passed away ! And may 
these young children learn the purpose of its erection from maternal lips ! 

Finally, I would say, may this country itself become one splendid monu- 
ment, not of oppression and terror, but of wisdom, of peace, and of liberty, 
upon which the world may gaze with admiration forever ! 

At the conclusion of the remarks by Mr. Siders, the following 
original ode, written by a lady, and read by the president of the 
day, was sung by the audience to the tune, " Old Hundred." 

God of our noble sires that dared 

A realm from tyrant hands to wrest ! 
Who oft in danger's hour has spared 

A land by threatening ills distressed, — 

To worthy sons thou didst intrust 

This heritage of blood and tears, 
And childrens', with the fathers' dust, 

Shall share the fame of future vears. 



THE MONUMENT. 49 

They fought, they fell, for freedom's sake. 

Spring's sweetest flowers their graves shall strew, 
And storied marbles long shall wake 

Within our hearts the grateful glow. 

God of our country ! in her cause 

Let every pulse beat true and high, 
Strong to maintain her righteous laws. 

Strong, like her brave, for her to die ! 

The benediction, by Rev. M. P. Alderman, pastor of the Meth- 
odist Society, closed the exercises of the day. 

The Monument is of Quincy granite. It rests upon a solid 
foundation, ten feet square by six feet deep, laid in regular courses 
of split stone and cement. The mottoes, mouldings, and embel- 
lishments upon it are skilfully wrought, and the general outline 
of the whole structure is neat and pleasing in appearance. The 
proportions are as follows : Lower base, eight feet nine inches 
square, by one foot five inches in height. Plinth, six feet eight 
inches square, by one foot five inches in height. Upper base, 
moulded, five feet eleven inches square, by one foot two inches in 
height. Die, four feet six inches square, by seven feet one inch 
in height. Shaft, two feet nine inches square at base, by nine- 
teen feet in height. Whole height, thirty feet. 

The die bears these inscriptions : — 
7 



50 



HINGHAM IN THE CIVIL WAR. 



[South Face.] 

ERECTED BY THE TOWN. 
1870. 

CAPT. EDWIN HUMPHREY. 
LIEUT. NATHANIEL FRENCH, Jr. 
SERGT. HENRY C. FRENCH. 

PETER OURISH. 
CORP. JACOB GILKEY GUSHING. 

W. IRVING STODDAR. 

NELSON F. CORTHELL. 

WILLIAM BREEN. 

PRIVATES. 

DANIEL L. BEAL. 
WILLIAM H. H. BEAL. 
WILLIAM B. GUSHING. 
JAMES T. CHURCHILL. 
CHARLES E. FRENCH. 
JOHN W. GARDNER. 
JOHN Q. HERSEY. 
BENJAMIN LINCOLN. 
WILLIAM J. STOCKWELL. 
DEMERICK STODDER. 
ALBERT WILDER. 

HONOR TO THE BRAVE. 



THE MONUMENT. 51 



[East Face.] 



REST THROUGH LIBERTY. 



MAJOR. BENJAMIN C. LINCOLN. 
LIEUT. FRANCIS THOMAS. 
" ELIJAH B. GILL, Jr. 
SERGT. LEAVITT LINCOLN. 



PRIVATES. 

HORACE D. BURR. 
THOMAS CHURCHILL. 
ANDREW J. DAMON. 
WILLIAM DUNBAR, Jr. 
JAMES FITZGERALD. 
MICHAEL FEE. 
RICHARD J. FARRELL. 
GARDNER JONES. 
HENRY B. LIVINGSTONE. 
JOHN S. NEAL. 
EDWARD A. F. SPEAR. 
DENNIS SCULLY. 
JOSEPH SIMMONS. 
THOMAS TINSLEY. 
FRANK H. TILTON. 



52 



HINGHAM IN THE CIVIL WAR. 



[North Face.] 



EVER FAITHFUL. 



LIEUT. GEORGE W. BIBBY. 
SERGT. JAMES M. HASKELL. 

WILLIAM H. JONES, Jr. 

CHARLES S. MEADE. 

MICHAEL THOMPSON. 
CORP. JEREMIAH J. CORCORAN. 

ALBERT S. HAYNES. 

HENRY F. MILLER. 



PRIVATES. 

GEORGE D. GARDNER. 
WALLACE HUMPHREY. 
WILLIAM H. JONES. 
SEWALL PUGSLEY. 
SAMUEL SPENCER. 
HORACE L. STUDLEY. 
THOMAS SPRAGUE. 
ALVIN TOWER. 
CHARLES E. WILDER. 
HORATIO P. WILLARD. 
DON PEDRO WILSON. 



THE MONUMENT. 53 



[West Face.] 



FOR OUR COUNTRY. 



CORP. CHARLES W. BLOSSOM. 
HIRAM W. HENDERSON. 
CHARLES D. KILBURN. 



PRIVATES. 

JAMES BALLENTINE. 
JOHN B. CREASE. 
PEREZ F. FEARING. 
DANIEL D. HERSEY. 
CHARLES H. MARSH. 
DANIEL MURPHY. 
JOHN L. MANUEL. 
CONRAD P. YAEGER. 
HOSEA O. BARNES. 
SAMUEL M. LINCOLN. 
HOLLIS HERSEY. 
HIRAM NEWCOMB. 
CALEB GILL. 
ACT. MAS. COM. THOMAS ANDREWS. 

ENSIGN. EDWARD W. HALCRO. 
SEAMAN. GEORGE H. MERRITT. 



54 



HINGHAM IN THE CIVIL WAR. 



FINAL REPORT OF THE MONUMENT COMMITTEE. 

The following abstract of the Final Report of the Monument 
Committee to the Town, affords a full account of their proceed- 
ings, as well as of the magnitude and responsibility of the duty 
they performed. 

The Committee to whom the whole subject of the erection of a monument 
was referred respectfully submit a full report of their doings to the Town, 
with such remarks and explanations as are deemed proper and necessary. 

On entering upon this duty, the Committee felt the magnitude and respon- 
sibility of the undertaking they assumed ; it being no temporary or tran- 
sient work, to be changed or altered at any convenient time, but a lasting 
memorial of sufferings and sacrifices endured for a cause which has no 
parallel in the history of ancient or modern warfare. 

The Town, in committing this subject to the judgment and discretion of 
the Committee, evinced a confidence which we trust the Committee duly 
appreciated in their desire to meet, as far as they were able, the wishes and 
expectations of the citizens. 

In locating the Monument, we fully realized the various conflicting views 
held by the residents of the several sections of the Town, who were honestly 
and faithfully aiding by sympathy and co-operation in this most desirable 
work. It was, therefore, a subject of anxious solicitude that this branch of 
their duty should be entered upon with deliberation, and with a full knowl- 
edge of the different sites which had been suggested by persons interested 
in this memorial. Hence your Committee, on the afternoon of April 9, 
visited the various places which had been named as suitable and proper for 
the location of the Monument ; and upon consultation, it was voted to refer 
the subject to the next meeting, deeming it wise to deliberate further before 
taking a final vote upon the subject. 

At a subsequent meeting (at which all were present) held at the Town 
Hall, April 15, to further consider the subject of location, and also of a 
design suitable for the Monument, it was agreed unanimously to locate it on 
the grounds of the Hingham Cemetery; it being understood at the time, 
and afterwards agreed to, that the proprietors of that cemetery would cheer- 
fully give to the Town a desirable lot of land for that purpose, with all the 
rights and privileges necessary for their convenience, and to forever keep the 
grounds in a neat and proper condition, without any expense to the Town. 

The Committee, in giving their final and hearty approval to it's being 
located in the Hingham Cemetery, perceived various and weighty reasons 
for so doing. There seemed to be but two places which could be obtained 



THE MONUMENT. 55 

desirable for its location, — one on the Common at Hingham Centre, and the 
other at the Hingham Cemetery. 

With regard to its location on the Common at Hingham Centre, different 
opinions appeared to prevail among those living in its immediate vicinity. 
Some strongly objected to its being placed there, for the reason that it would 
destroy its usefulness as a place for rural and pleasurable sports ; others 
thought it the proper and only place, being the most central and the most 
desirable spot for its location. Your Committee did not believe it to be 
desirable to place the Monument where a considerable number of the inhab- 
itants, living near by, strongly objected. 

The Hingham Cemetery offered peculiar attractions as a place for the 
Monument to be erected. It was somewhat remote from the public gaze, 
and yet one to which visitors could retire without annoyance from the public 
travel. It was deemed that this would be in accordance with the taste and 
feelings of a majority of our citizens. This cemetery is emphatically one in 
which the whole people of Hingham are deeply interested to preserve and 
beautify. And it must ever remain so, as long as revolutionary heroes and 
defenders of the republic mingle their dust with those of their friends in this 
place. 

Having at length, after much deliberation, decided upon the spot, the 
next step was to procure a design and issue proposals for building and set- 
ting the Monument. The Committee visited several monuments, and pro- 
cured various designs or plans, which were duly examined ; but the present 
design was thought the best, considering the sum of money the Town felt 
able and willing to spend in its erection. 

At a meeting of the Committee, held April 15, a sub-committee was 
chosen to issue proposals, with plans and specifications for building and set- 
ting it. The Committee immediately entered upon their work ; and at a 
meeting of the whole Committee, held June 8, responses to their proposals 
had been received from four gentlemen to build and set the Monument, 
according to the design and specifications issued. The gentlemen propos- 
ing to build the Monument were men of integrity and uprightness, and could 
be relied upon to do, in a faithful and workmanlike manner, whatever work 
they undertook. But the great disparity in the estimates of these gentle- 
men made it imperative on your Committee to accept of the proposal of Mr. 
F. J. Fuller of Quincy, as the builder, for the sum of five thousand dollars, 
the whole to be completed by the 15th of October. Mr. Fuller entered at 
once upon the work, but soon perceived the time was too limited, which 
induced him to ask of the Committee an extension to the ist of November. 
This proposition was brought to the attention of the Committee at their 
meeting, Sept. 4; and they at once, in view of the lateness of the season, 
voted to extend the time to the first of May, the Committee being assured 
that some additions and improvements would be made if that time was 
allowed for its being finished. 

We believe Mr. Fuller has acted honestly and conscientiously in the mat- 



56 HINGHAM IN THE CIVIL WAR. 

ter, and has given us a piece of work which is an honor to the Town, and 
one that reflects great credit upon himself and upon his fame as a skilful 
artisan. 

It will be seen by reference to the vote of the Town, that they instructed 
the Committee to " cause the names of all the soldiers and sailors represent- 
ing the Town who died or were slain during the rebellion, also those who 
in the service of other towns, but natives of Hingham, died in the ser- 
vice, to be engraved upon the Monument." 

The Committee have endeavored to adhere strictly to the wishes of the 
Town in this regard, not only causing the names of all native born citizens to 
be inscribed upon the Monument, and also those representing the Town, 
but they felt confident of the public approval of their act in causing the names 
of all residents who served in the rebellion to be inscribed thereon. Nearly 
half of those who left Hingham for the war were residents, some of them 
for many years, and were surely entitled to that consideration and respect 
which we had proposed to bestow upon native born citizens. The vote of 
the town would seem to imply that the names of none were to be inscribed 
upon the Monument, except those "who died or were slain during the 
war." 

There is a large class of those whose lives were sacrificed in the cause of 
the rebellion who lingered, some of them a long time, after the advent of 
peace. Though they died after the rebellion ended, they were martyrs to 
the cause of the Union, as well as those who died upon the field of battle. 
Your Committee did not hesitate to have the names of all such inscribed 
upon the Monument, firmly anticipating the Town's hearty approval of this 
seeming deviation from their instructions in this matter. 

The Town directed, "Should the Committee deem it expedient, to have 
inscribed thereon the names of all notives of Hingham who died in the ser- 
vice of their country during any former war." The records, and even the 
families, of many of these soldiers have passed away in the march of time, 
making it impossible to obtain any thing like a reliable list of them. Your 
Committee, therefore, deemed it inexpedient to have the names of this class 
inscribed upon the Monument for the reason above stated. 

The following contents were placed under the Monument by a vote of the 
Town, viz. : — 

The names of the officers and members of the Lincoln Light Infantry 
who answered the first call for troops in April, 1861. 

The names of all soldiers and sailors who represented the Town during 
the rebellion. 

The names of the Committee chosen to cause the Monument to be erected. 

The names of the citizens and children who have made donations for this 
object. 

These have been engrossed on parchment by the Town clerk, Charles N. 
Marsh, Esq., and placed under the corner-stone of the Monument. 

By a vote of the Committee passed May 9, 1870. the following docu- 



THE MONUMENT. 



57 



merits were added to the list, and all enclosed in a metallic box, and placed 
under the Monument : — 

Reports of the Selectmen of the Town for the years 1868 and 1869. 

Report of the Hingham Agricultural and Horticultural Society for the 
year 1869. 

Copy of the Hingham Journal of June 10, 1870. 

The name of the orator of the day ; names of the chief marshal and his 
aids; names of the officers and members of Post No. 104 of the Grand 
Army of the Republic ; name of the architect and builder of the Monument. 

Copies of the seals of the Hingham National Bank; also those of the 
Hingham Institution for Savings, and the Hingham First Parish Society. 

Specimens of silver and copper coins, fractional currency, revenue stamps, 
and postage stamps of the United States. 

A piece of oak from the meeting-house of the First Parish. 

A piece of hard pine, taken from one of the deck-planks of Minot's Ledge 
Light (destroyed in the gale of 1851). 

Photographs of Children's Mission building, Boston. 

Some wheat which was used at the laying of the corner-stone of Bunker 
Hill .Monument, at the laying of the foundation-stone of the statue of War- 
ren, the corner-stone of the Minot's Ledge Light-house, the corner-stone 
of the two monuments at Plymouth. 

It was the intention of the Committee to have the whole work completed 
and dedicated some time in the month of May, but the unavoidable delay in 
the completion of the Monument rendered it impossible to do so. Con- 
sequently your Committee fixed upon the 17th of June, as a fitting and 
proper time ; it being a day of historic fame in the annals of liberty and 
American Independence. The Monument on Bunker Hill tells of deeds and 
sacrifices for national and individual liberty. The Monument we have erected 
will tell alike of noble and generous deeds, sacrifices and privations, to per- 
petuate the blessings we inherited from those whose name and fame will ever 
be sacred to hearts wherever beating in the cause of human freedom. 

Early in the summer of 1869, your Committee invited the Hon. Solomon 
Lincoln to address the citizens of Hingham at the dedication of the Monu- 
ment. It was not the Committee alone whose voice was heard in this mat- 
ter. The citizens, one and all, expressed a desire that Mr. Lincoln's services 
should be secured for that occasion, if not at too great a sacrifice to himself 
and others. The Committee corresponded with Mr. Lincoln several times, 
with a view to this object. Being active in sympathy and co-operation with 
the soldiers during the war, and also in the proposed testimonial to their 
services, he finally consented, although amid pressing daily duties and ill- 
health, to respond to the wishes of his fellow-citizens. We need not say 
that the address was listened to with the closest attention, and was expressive 
of the feelings and sentiments of those who heard it. We recommend that 
the Town take such measures to publish it, with a full account of the doings 
of the dedication, as in their minds the importance of the occasion demands. 
8 



58 



HINGHAM IN THE CIVIL WAR. 



Having performed the work intrusted to them, and seeing the Monu- 
ment properly placed upon the grounds selected for that purpose, the chair- 
man ^r*? /<?;//., in behalf of the Committee, and in presence of the assembled 
citizens of Hingham and her guests from abroad, formally delivered it over 
to the authorities of the Town. The chairman of the selectmen responded 
in a few appropriate remarks, accepting the trust, and with other ceremonies 
the exercises of the day were brought to a close. The unfavorable state of 
the weather made the out-of-door exercises somewhat embarrassing, yet we 
believe they were generally of such a nature as to leave a deep and lasting 
impression upon the minds of all who were present. 

Much credit is due the president of the day, for the able manner in which 
he presided at the dedication; and also the chief marshal and his assistants, 
for the ability shown in the discharge of so important a duty. 

The Hingham Post should not be forgotten, affording as they did substan- 
tial aid to the Committee in furthering the objects of the dedication. 

The Muses, also, which are usually evoked on such occasions, were not 
silent, as was evinced by many patriotic and soul-stirring pieces. 

The singing, under the direction of Mr. E. B. Whitcomb, was conducted 
in a manner to reflect credit upon those who represent the musical portion 
of our Town. 

The financial account of the Committee is as follows : Received from the 
citizens of Hingham, whose names have been engrossed on parchment and 
placed under the Monument, according to a vote of the Town, eight hundred 
and eighty-one dollars and forty-four cents. Six hundred and fifty-seven 
persons paid from one dollar to fifty ; two hundred and sixty-four paid ten 
cents and upwards. This sum was considerably reduced by the expenses 
necessarily attending the erection of the Monument. 

The Committee, desirous of dedicating the Monument in an appropriate 
and suitable manner, with such services as should be lasting and impressive, 
especially on the youth of this Town, found their funds inadequate to meet 
the expenses of the occasion. Several of our liberal and enterprising citi- 
zens cheerfully responded to the wants of the Committee, by placing in their 
hands the sum of six hundred and sixty-five dollars for the furtherance and 
completion of this object. The Hingham Post contributed seventy-five dol- 
lars towards the expenses of the dedication. 

The whole sum received by the Committee, including the five thousand 
dollars received from the town for the Monument, was six thousand six 
hundred and twenty -one dollars and twenty-one cents. 

The Committee paid Mr. F. J. Fuller of Quincy, for building and setting 
the Monument, five thousand dollars. 

The expenses of the Committee before and for the dedication were fifteen 
hundred and eighty dollars and fifty-two cents, leaving a balance in the hands 
of the Treasurer, Mr. John Todd, of forty dollars and fifty-two cents, which 
sum has been given to the " Charity Fund " of Post 104 of the Grand Army 
of the Republic. 



THE MONUMENT. 59 

In concluding this somewhat lengthy and imperfect report of our doings, 
the Committee beg leave to say, that the utmost harmony has existed in 
their deliberations, and no feeling has prevailed other than one of disinter- 
estedness and true devotion to the ob)ject for which they were chosen. 

The Committee have held twenty-three meetings. They visited the work 
as it progressed, several times, with a view to perfecting every part ; and 
while they do not claim perfection in their doings, they flatter themselves 
that the industry and perseverance they have manifested will entitle them 
to the charitable judgment of their fellow-citizens. 

Respectfully submitted, 

E. Waters Burr, 
Amasa Whiting, 
John K. Corthell, 
John Todd, 
Samuel J. Henderson, 
William J. Nelson, 
William Thomas, 
Elijah Shute, 

HiNGHAM, March 6, 1871. JOHN CUSHING. 



--s«^£^f^''^&^i 




CHAPTER II. 

PROCEEDINGS OF TOWN AND CITIZENS* MEETINGS. 

Relief for the Families of the Lincoln Light Infantrj- — Meetings held by the Ladies to 
make Garments for the Soldiers — Appropriation by theTown — Committees appointed — 
Public Reception of the Lincoln Light Infantry on their Return from Fortress Monroe — 
Aid to the Families of Volunteers — Bounty to Volunteers — Committee chosen to encour- 
age Enlistments for Three Years — Increase of Bounty offered to Volunteers for Nine 
Months — Liberality of the Citizens — The Second Battle of Bull Run — The Ladies meet on 
Sunday to prepare Hospital Supplies — War-Meetings — Earnest Call for Enlistments — 
Companies of "Exempts" formed — Parade of the "Home Guards," and Address by 
Rev. Joseph Richardson — Appropriations for Town and State Aid — More War-Meetings 
— Letter from Gov. Andrew — Meetings of Citizens liable to Draft — Rallying Committee 
appointed — Citizens' Subscription — Individual Acts of Generosity — Recruiting Money 
to be refunded — Town Assistance in obtaining Recruits — The Great National Calamity — 
Meeting of Citizens — Expressions of Grief — Funeral Ceremonies. 

THE facts presented in this chapter have been obtained from 
the Records of the Secretary, and Treasurer of the Citizens' 
Recruiting Committee ; from private diaries, Town documents, 
and the columns of " The Hingham Journal." 

April 19, 1861. — A meeting of the citizens of Hingham was 
held at the Town Hall for the purpose of devising measures for 
the relief of such families of members of the Lincoln Light 
Infantry as might need assistance during the absence of the com- 
pany. The meeting was called to order by Capt. John Stephen- 
son, who stated, that, in consequence of the sudden departure of 
the Lincoln Light Infantry for Fortress Monroe, a number of 
families in town were left without their usual means of support ; 
and in closing he gave the number of persons that would proba- 
bly need assistance for the next three months. 

Caleb Gill was chosen chairman of the meeting, and Henry 
C. Harding, secretary. 

Remarks appropriate to the occasion were then made by 
Revs. Calvin Lincoln, E, Porter Dyer, and Jonathan Tilson ; 
and also by Luther Stephenson, Capt. Jairus B. Lincoln, 



PROCEEDINGS OF TOWN AND CITIZENS' MEETINGS. 6 1 

Isaac Barnes, Bela T. Sprague, Elijah Whiton, Robert W. Lin- 
coln, and others. Subsequently a subscription was suggested ; 
and by the unanimous vote of those present, a committee, con- 
sisting of Messrs. John Todd, John Stephenson, and Joseph 
Jacob, was chosen to carry the same into effect. A paper was 
immediately circulated in the hall, from which was realized the 
sum of eight hundred dollars. The meeting was large and very 
enthusiastic. 

Sunday, p.m., April 28. — A large number of ladies met at 
Masonic Hall, in Lincoln Building, for the purpose of making 
clothing to be sent to the members of the Lincoln Light 
Infantry at Fortress Monroe. Mrs. Solomon Lincoln acted as 
principal superintendent of the work, and under her direction it 
was completed in time for shipment by steamer " Cambridge." 
The labor of pressing and finishing was performed by Messrs. 
Lincoln Burr, John K. Corbett, John Todd, and Loring Jacob, 
who gratuitously proffered their valuable services for the occasion. 

During the war, the ladies of the various sewing-circles held 
frequent meetings in the different sections of the town for the 
purpose of preparing comfortable raiment for our men in the 
service. These meetings were generally held at Loring, Tor- 
rent, Niagara, Union, Constitution, and Liberty Halls. But 
there were also other gatherings for this purpose at the resi- 
dences of mothers, sisters, daughters, and friends who were 
unable to leave their homes ; and thus the good work found 
willing hands and patriotic hearts among the daughters as well 
as the sons of Hingham. 

April ^o. — At a Town-meeting, Charles W. Cushing, Esq., 
in the chair, it was 

" Voted, That the Town appropriate $6,000, for the purpose of 
furnishing such supplies as may be wanted by the families of 
those who have been, or may be, called into the service of their 
country ; and that the money be expended under the direction 
of a committee of six, consisting of John Todd, David Cain, 
John Stephenson, Demerick Marble, Joseph Jacob, and Albert 
Whiting." Should more troops be called from this Town, the 
committee were instructed to furnish them with clothing and 
other necessaries. 



62 HINGHAM IN THE CIVIL WAR. 

yuly 10, 1861. — A citizens' meeting was held for the purpose 
of making arrangements for the reception of the Lincoln Light 
Infantry on their return from the seat of war. Col. Charles W. 
Seymour was chosen moderator, and Henry E. Hersey, Esq., 
secretary. Addresses by Melzar W. Clark, John Cushing, 
James S. Lewis, Esq., Luther Stephenson, Col. Seymour, and 
others were made ; and a committee was chosen to make the 
necessary arrangements for their reception. 

COMMITTEE OF ARRANGEMENTS. 

John Todd, John Stephenson, Joseph Jacob, William Fearing, 
2d, David Cain, E. Waters Burr, Elijah L. Whiton, Daniel 
Bassett, David Leavitt, Demerick Marble, Abner L. Leavitt, John 
K. Corthell, John Cushing, David Cushing, jun., E. Barker 
Whitcomb, Charles W. Seymour, Henry E. Hersey, Joseph B. 
Thaxter, jun., Thomas F. Whiton, and Albert Whiting. 

The Marshals appointed were, Albert Whiting, Seth C. Dun- 
bar, Joseph Jacob, jun., Ezra Wilder, George Cushing, 2d, Solo- 
mon Lincoln, jun., Henry C. Harding, Charles Spring, William 
C. Lincoln, George Lincoln, jun., John D. Gates, Robert W. 
Lincoln, Charles W. Cushing, Erastus Whiton, Hiram Gardner, 
Ezra T. C. Stephenson, Joseph H. French, George H. French, 
Albert E. Thayer, Joseph A. Newhall, Benjamin Thomas, and 
Enos Loring. 

Aids. — Daniel Bassett, David Cushing, jun., John K. Corthell, 
Edwin Wilder, 2d, and Thomas Stephenson. 

yuly 18. — At a meetmg of the Committee of Arrangements, 
it was decided to provide a collation at the Town Hall ; and the 
following ladies and gentlemen were chosen to carry the same 
into effect : viz., Mrs. Albert Whiting, Mrs. John Cushing, Mrs. 
E. Barker Whitcomb, Mrs. B. S. Hersey, Miss Elizabeth L. 
Cushing, Mrs. Lucy Sturtevant, Mrs. David R. Hersey, Mrs. 
William Thomas, Mrs. Thomas J. Leavitt, Mrs. John S. Souther, 
Mrs. E. Waters Burr, Miss Sally Thaxter, Mrs. Joseph A. New- 
hall, Mrs. Walton V. Meade, Miss Sarah L. Marsh, David Leavitt, 
David Cushing, jun., Daniel Bassett, Abner L. Leavitt, and 
Thomas F. Whiton. 

Nov. 15, 1861. — At a meeting of the inhabitants of Hingham, 



PROCEEDINGS OF TOWN AND CITIZENS' MEETINGS. 63 

in Town meeting assembled, Col. Charles W. Seymour in the 
chair, it was 

" Voted, That the sum of three thousand dollars be raised in aid 
of the families of volunteers, and that the selectmen be author- 
ized to apply the same as their judgment shall dictate." 

March I, 1862. — At a Town-meeting, the Committee previ- 
ously chosen to direct the expenditures of money appropriated 
for aid to the families of volunteers, and for furnishing clothing 
and other necessaries to volunteers which might be called into 
service at a future time, reported that they had expended for 
Company I, Fourth Regiment M. V. M. (the Lincoln Light 
Infantry), for uniforms, under-clothing, caps, shoes, &c., ^1331.27, 
and to volunteers in other companies ;^i8.50. 

yuly ^, 1862. — At a Town-meeting held this day, at four 
o'clock, P.M., Capt. John Stephenson moderator, it was 

" Voted, To raise five thousand dollars for the payment of State 
aid to the families of volunteers enlisted in the service of the 
United States, and one thousand dollars as Town aid to volunteers 
and their families, the same to be appropriated under the direc- 
tion of the selectmen. 

yuly II. — A large and enthusiastic meeting of the citizens 
of Hmgham was held this Friday evening, at the Town Hall, in 
response to the call of the selectmen to take action in reference 
to furnishing the Town's quota of recruits as called for by the 
commander-in-chief The following offcers were chosen, viz.: 
President, Luther Stephenson ; Vice-Presidents, Edward Caz- 
NEAU, Caleb S. Hunt, Demerick Marble, James S. Lewis, 
Crocker Wilder, and Seth Sprague. 

Charles N. Marsh was chosen Secretary, but, not being present, 
Henry C. Harding was chosen Secretary pro tern. 

Animating and encouraging addresses were made by the pre- 
siding officer and other gentlemen, urging enlistments, and 
recommending that a liberal bounty be paid by the Town to vol- 
unteers, and offering to contribute generously, if need be, to 
prevent the necessity of a draft. 

Voted, Unanimously, to recommend to the Town that an 
appropriation be made sufficient to pay a bounty of seventy-five 
dollars to each person who may volunteer to make up the quota 
of men required of this Town. It was also 



64 HINGHAM IN THE CIVIL WAR. 

Voted, That a committee of twelve be chosen to co-operate 
with the selectmen in procuring enlistments, and the following 
persons were chosen, viz. : Rev. Jonathan Tilson, Rev. J. L. 
Hatch, Edward Cazneau, Seth Sprague, Demerick Marble, 
Albert Whiting, Charles Sprague, Ezra Wilder, Elijah L. Whi- 
ton, George Hersey, jun., Andrew W. Gardner, Abner L. Beal, 
E. Barker Whitcomb, Edmund Hersey, Thomas Fee, and John 
Stephenson. 

yitly 15. — Agreeably to a call issued by the committee chosen 
July II, the citizens met at the Town Hall to consider the 
great and important question of the day, — the call for volun- 
teers. 

The meeting was called to order by Col. Cazneau, and organ- 
ized by the choice of the following officers, viz. : President, Hon. 
Solomon Lincoln. "Vice-Presidents, Jairus B Lincoln, George P. 
Hayward, Charles Siders, J. Sturgis Nye, William Whiton, Isaac 
Barnes, Robert W. Lincoln, Joseph B. Thaxter, jun., James S, 
Lewis, Joseph Ripley, Alfred Loring, George M. Soule, Luther 
Stephenson, Crocker Wilder, Charles W. Seymour, John Lin- 
coln, James L. Gardner, Anson Nickerson, Orr F. Jerald, and 
Elijah Whiton. Secretaries, Charles N. Marsh, and Henry C. 
Harding. 

The President, upon taking the chair, stated the object of the 
meeting, and urged upon all present the duty of responding 
promptly to the necessities and demands of the present crisis. 
He, then called upon Revs. Calvin Lincoln, J. L. Hatch, Daniel 
Bowen, John E. Davenport, E. Porter Dyer, and Jonathan Til- 
son, who responded in short, patriotic, and pertinent addresses. 
E. S. Tobey, Esq., of Boston, being present, was also called upon ; 
and, although not a citizen of Hingham, he offered to contribute, 
if necessity required, towards furnishing the means to induce 
young men to enlist. 

On motion of George Hersey, jun., it was 
Voted, To recommend to the Town, that a bounty of one 
hundred dollars be paid to each volunteer. The meeting then 
adjourned. 

yuly 19. — At a Town meeting held this Saturday evening, 
Col. Cazneau was chosen moderator. 



PROCEEDINGS OF TOWN AND CITIZENS' MEETINGS. 65 

Voted, To pay volunteers who may be accepted, and mustered 
into the service of the United States, to the number of fifty-one, 
— that being the quota of this town, — a bounty of one hundred 
dollars each ; and the Town treasurer was authorized to hire 
money for the payment of the same. 

The citizens' meeting, adjourned from Tuesday evening last, 
was held immediately after the Town-meeting. Col. Cazneau 
made the opening remarks ; and in the absence of Hon. Solo- 
mon Lincoln, the president, Luther Stephenson was called to 
the chair. Brief addresses were made by Caleb Gill, Caleb T. 
Bassett, Rev. Mr. Davenport, George Hersey, jun., Caleb Stod- 
der, John Gushing, and the presiding officer. Several young 
men then came forward and signed the enlistment papers. On 
motion of Col. Cazneau, the meeting adjourned to meet at the 
same place the Tuesday following. 

ytily 22. — An adjourned war-meeting was held at the Town 
Hall, for the purpose of obtaining volunteers. Luther Stephenson 
presided. Col. Cazneau spoke of the services rendered by Capts. 
Stephenson and Humphrey, of Lieuts. French, Whiton, and 
Bouve, and also referred to the noble young men who had gone 
from this Town as privates and in other capacities. Revs. 
Messrs. Hatch, Tilson, Davenport, and Dyer followed. The 
meeting was further addressed by Capt. John Stephenson, Melzar 
W. Clark, and Capt. Peter N. Sprague. 

On motion of Col. Cazneau, Capt. John Stephenson, and Peter 
Hersey, jun., were chosen to nominate a committee of ladies, 
whose duty it shall be to call the next meeting at such time and 
place as they may decide upon, with authority to procure speak- 
ers, music, and whatever else may be wanted to insure a grand 
gathering. The ladies chosen upon- this committee were, Mrs. 
Jairus B. Lincoln, Mrs. Jonathan Tilson, Mrs. E. Porter Dyer, 
Mrs. J. L. Hatch, Mrs. Alfred Loring, Mrs. Job S. Whiton, Mrs. 
Charles W. Gushing, Mrs. John Lincoln, Mrs. David R. Hersey, 
Mrs. Alfred A. Rouel, and Mrs. John E. Davenport. The meet- 
ing then adjourned to meet at the call of the committee of 
ladies. 

Aug. 6, 1862. — A meeting appointed by the ladies of Hing- 
ham, to encourage the enlistment of volunteers to fill the quota 



^^ HINGHAM IN THE CIVIL WAR. 

f 

of the Town, was held at the Town Hall. It was largely- 
attended. 

Capt. Jairus B. Lincoln called the meeting to order, and read 
the names of the persons selected for president, vice-presidents, 
and secretaries. 

Luther Stephenson, having been mentioned as president, took 
the chair. After a few complimentary words to the ladies, he 
called upon Rev. E. Porter Dyer, who responded in his usual 
happy manner. Mr. Southworth, of Scituate, followed. 

Edward S. Tobey, Esq., of Boston, also gave an earnest and 
forcible address. 

Rev. E. Porter Dyer then read an original poem. Rev. Calvin 
Lincoln and others followed ; after which several recruits came 
forward, and signed the enlistment papers. The meeting was 
then adjourned to the next evening. 

Aug. y. — At a citizens' meeting held in the Town Hall, it 
was " Voted, To recommend the Town to increase the amount of 
bounty to volunteers from one hundred, to two hundred dollars." 

Aug. II. — At a meeting of the citizens, it was " Voted to 
request the selectmen to offer a bounty of one hundred dollars 
to all volunteers who will enlist upon the second call, the same 
being for nine months' service." This meeting was enlivened 
by the fine performances of the Weymouth Band, who volun- 
teered their services for the occasion. 

Aug. 15. — At a Town-meeting, Luther Stephenson being 
moderator, it was 

" Voteu, To give one hundred dollars in addition to the sum 
already authorized to be paid to volunteers for three years, for 
the first quota. 

Aug. 27. — A meeting of the citizens was held to aid in the 
enlistment of volunteers for nine months. Addresses were made 
by several individuals present ; and it was " Voted, To recommend 
the Town to pay fifty dollars additional bounty," thereby raising 
the amount to one hundred and fifty dollars for nine months' 
men. 

Aug. 29. — A Town-meeting was held this evening, to fix upon 
the amount of bounty to be offered for recruits, who will volun- 
teer upon the quota of Hingham for nine months. 



PROCEEDINGS OF TOWN AND CITIZENS' MEETINGS. 67 

Crocker Wilder, Esq., was chosen moderator; and it was 
" Voted, To add fifty dollars to the one hundred recommended at 
the meeting held on the 15th inst. ;" making, in all, a bounty of 
one hundred and fifty dollars for each volunteer upon the second 
quota. 

A citizens' war-meeting was held immediately after the Town- 
meeting last mentioned. Luther Stephenson occupied the chair, 
and Henry C Harding acted as secretary. 

After vocal music by the Whitcomb Family, Rev. Mr. Round 
of Boston was introduced, and, being himself a recruit, was able 
to enforce his eloquence by saying to the young men about him, 
Come ! Rev. Mr. Hinckley, Messrs. George Hersey, jun., and 
Caleb T. Bassett, followed. Rev. E. Porter Dyer, being the next 
speaker, took the opportunity to introduce Mr. E. Waters Burr, 
who made a brief but highly patriotic speech; and in closing, he 
generously pledged himself to give ten dollars each to the ten men 
who would first come forward and enlist. Mr. George P. Hay- 
ward also offered to pay the family of the first married man who 
would enlist, if he should be accepted, the sum of twelve dol- 
lars the first month, and eleven dollars for each of the subsequent 
eight months. Another gentleman would give five dollars each 
to the first five men who would enlist that night. These gener- 
ous offers were received with hearty and prolonged applause, and 
several names were added to the list of recruits. 

Aug. 31. — News of the second battle of Bull Run, and of 
the immediate need of hospital supplies at Washington, D.C., 
having reached town by telegraph this Sunday morning, the 
usual afternoon service at the churches was generally omitted, 
in order that the ladies of the different societies might devote 
their time either to making hospital garments or in preparing 
bandages, lint, &c., for the wounded soldiers. 

The next day ( Monday) several packages, containing the 
necessary articles for the wounded, were sent to the Sanitary 
Rooms in Boston by the ladies of Hingham, to be forwarded to 
Washington. 

Sept. 8, 1862. — A very full meeting of the citizens was held 
at the Town Hall this Monday evening. Col. Cazneau, chair- 
man of the board of selectmen, presided. After the opening 



68 HINGHAM IN THE CIVIL WAR. 

remarks, Capt. Rounds of Boston was introduced. Rev. Mr. 
Hatch followed. Edward S. Tobey, Esq., then eloquently ap- 
pealed to the young men to come forward and enroll their names. 

Luther Stephenson, Quincy Bicknell, and Col. Seymour made 
earnest and stirring addresses, after which the meeting was 
adjourned. 

Sept. 12, 1862. — An adjourned meeting of the citizens 
was held at the Town Hall, with Col. Cazneau in the chair, and 
Israel Whitcomb as secretary. 

The following persons were chosen a committee to canvass 
their respective districts for the purpose of obtaining the signa- 
tures of exempts from military duty, and organizing the same 
into a company or companies viz. ; Joseph Jacob and Seth 
Sprague in the south school district ; John Stephenson and 
John Leavitt in the middle district ; John Todd and Elijah 
L. Whiton in the north district ; Quincy Bicknell, Caleb Gill, and 
Edward Cazneau in the west district. Appropriate addresses 
were made by Col. Cazneau, Quincy Bicknell, Caleb Gill, Luther 
Stephenson, Rev. E. Porter Dyer, Col. Seymour, and others. 

Subsequently two companies of " Home Guards," numbering 
in all about one hundred men, paraded as a battalion the 22d of 
October, and, after marching through the principal streets of the 
Town, partook of a collation at Loring Hall. Rev. Joseph 
Richardson, the senior pastor of the First Parish, and others, 
addressed the assembly. A second parade occurred on the after- 
noon of the annual election, Nov. 4. 

Dec. 2, 1862. — At a Town-meeting held this evening, Quincy 
Bicknell, Esq., in the chair, it was 

"■ Voted, T o 2m\.\\ox\zq the selectmen, should they deem it ex- 
pedient, to increase the bounty from one hundred and fifty dol- 
lars to a sum not exceeding two hundred dollars, for volunteers to 
fill up the quota of the Town." 

" Voted, That the use of the Centre School House of the west 
district be granted to the ' Home Guard ' for drill purposes, sub- 
ject to the regulation and control of the School Committee." 

March 9, 1863. — A Town-meeting was held, with Col. Charles 
W. Seymour as moderator. 

" Voted, That the sum of $9,000 be placed at the disposal of the 



PROCEEDINGS OF TOWN AND CITIZENS' MEETINGS. 



69 



selectmen for the payment of State aid to the families of volun- 
teers, if needed." 

" Voted., That the sum of $800 be raised by taxation as Town aid 
to the families of volunteers, if needed, to be expended under 
the direction of the selectmen." 

April 6, 1863. — Town-meeting; Caleb Gill, Esq., moderator. 

" Voted, That the Town treasurer be authorized, under the 
direction of the selectmen, to hire such sums of money as may 
be required to carry into effect the ist and 2d sections of chapter 
79 of the Acts of the General Court for 1863, relating to the 
paying of State aid to the families of deceased and disabled 
volunteers." 

Aug. 14, 1863. — At a Town-meeting held this evening, Jam,es 
S, Lewis, Esq., moderator, it was " Voted, That the sum of 
$15,000, for State and Town aid, be raised by the Town, and be 
and hereby is appropriated, under the direction of the selectmen, 
for the aid of the wives, children, parents, brothers, and sisters 
of those inhabitants of the Town who may be drafted into the 
army of the United States, and serve therein, under the law 
passed by Congress entitled "An Act enrolling and calling out 
the National Forces, and for other purposes," approved March 3, 
1863, provided no more than $200 shall be paid to or for any 
one person, in addition to State aid." 

" Voted, That the treasurer be authorized to hire the sum of 
$15,000, to carry the above vote into effect, under the direction 
of the selectmen, should they deem it necessary." 

Nov. 3, 1863. — Town-meeting. The subject of allowing to 
David H. Champlin the aid granted to drafted men according to 
a vote of the Town, Aug. 14, 1863, was referred to a committee 
consisting of Samuel L. Fearing, John Todd, and Melzar W. 
Clark, to report thereon at a future meeting. 

Dec. 7, 1863. — At a war-meeting of the citizens of Hingham, 
held at the Town Hall this Monday evening, Edward Cazneau 
was chosen president, and Charles N. Marsh, secretary. 

The meeting was addressed by Rev. Calvin Lincoln, Rev. 
Joshua Young, Luther Stephenson, Col. Charles W. Seymour, 
and the chairman. 

Dec. II. — An adjourned meeting of the citizens of Hingham 



70 



HINGHAM IN THE CIVIL WAR. 



was held this Friday evening, to aid in filling up the quota of 
the town. Col. Cazneau presided, and Charles N. Marsh offici- 
ated as secretary. Addresses were made by Col. Seymour, Rev. 
E. Porter Dyer, Messrs. Benjamin Thomas, Luther Stephenson, 
Caleb T. Bassett, and Revs. Messrs. Lincoln and Hatch. The 
secretary then read a communication from Rev. Joshua Young, 
which among other good things contained a sentiment relating 
to " Our Armies," and one also to " Old Hingham." 

The following letter was received from Gov. Andrew, in reply 
to an invitation to be present and address the meeting : — 

Boston, Dec. i, 1863. 
Edward Cazneau, "Esq., Chairman of Selectme7t, Hingham. 

Dear Sir, — In reply to yours of Nov. 28, I can only say that it is impos- 
sible for me to attend the meeting at Hingham on Monday, Dec. 7, as you 
request, although I need not assure you what pleasure it would give me 
to meet my friends and neighbors, or to aid in the labor of recruiting there, 
if it were in my power to do so. 

Very respectfully your friend and servant, 

John A. Andrew, Governor of Massachusetts. 

This meeting was enlivened by the excellent performances of 
the Weymouth Band. On motion of Capt. John Stephenson, a 
rallying committee was chosen to aid the selectmen in obtaining 
recruits. The names of the committee were as follows : 
Crocker Wilder, Amasa Whiting, Alfred Loring, Ezra Wilder, 
John Cushing, Andrew W. Dunbar, John Stephenson, David 
Leavitt, John K. Corthell, Fearing Buit, jun., J. Sturgis Nye, 
Ezra Stephenson, George Hersey, jun., Joseph Ripley, Joseph B. 
Thaxter, jun., Charles W. Seymour, Benjamin Thomas, William 
J. Nelson, Isaac Barnes, and Israel Whitcomb. 

Dec. 14. — At a meeting of the citizens liable to draft, George 
Hersey, jun., was chosen chairman, and Israel Whitcomb, 
secretary. 

" Voted, That a subscription paper be circulated among those 
persons present who are liable to a draft, to ascertain the amount 
of money that can be raised towards securing recruits for the 
quota of Hingham under the last call of the President of the 
United States. 

" Voted, To choose a committee of twelve to solicit subscrip- 



PROCEEDINGS OF TOWN AND CITIZENS' MEETINGS. ji 

tions from persons who are liable to draft, and not present at 
this meeting. The committee chosen were as follows : Amasa 
Whiting, George Dunbar, and William Gushing, of the South 
Ward. Henry Stephenson, Henry Merritt, jun., and Joseph T. 
Sprague, of the Middle Ward. Charles N. Marsh, Samuel M. 
Beal, and Isaac Gardner, of the North Ward ; and Edmund 
Hersey, 2d, William F. Harden, and Isaac W. Our, of the west 
district of the North Ward. 

" Voted, To choose a committee of twenty-five, to solicit sub- 
scriptions from the community at large, for the purpose of filling 
the quota of Hingham under the call of the President of the 
United States, dated Oct. 17,1863." The persons chosen upon 
this committee were: Amasa Whiting, Albert B. Loring, Alfred 
Loring, William C. Wilder, Ezra Wilder, E. Barker Whitcomb, 
Samuel Lincoln, Israel Whitcomb, Joseph T. Sprague, Charles 
B. Boyd, David Leavitt, John Stephenson, John B. Lewis, Sam- 
uel L. Beal, J. Sturgis Nye, William J. Nelson, Henry C. Hard- 
ing, Andrew J. Gardner, George Hersey, jun., Gridley F. Hersey, 
George Lincoln, jun., Henry Stephenson, Joseph Ripley, Caleb 
S. Hersey, and George Tilden. 

David Gushing, jun., was added to the committee at large, to 
solicit subscriptions from Hingham persons who were residing 
in Boston. 

Adjourned to meet the next evening. 

Dec. 15. — At a meeting of the citizens liable to draft, held 
this evening. Col. Seymour was chosen treasurer. " Voted, That 
the whole matter of recruiting for the quota of the Town be 
recommitted to the former committee of twenty, chosen by the 
citizens of Hingham." 

Dec. 30. — A meeting of the citizens of Hingham liable to 
draft, and of others interested in filling the quota of the Town, 
was held this evening. Crocker Wilder, Esq., was chosen chair- 
man, and Israel Whitcomb, secretary. 

Col. Seymour, treasurer, reported that he had received from 
the soliciting committee the sum of $4,685, and had paid to per- 
sons for recruiting purposes $1,391,34 ; leaving a balance on hand 
of $3,293,66. 
• " Voted, To hold a war meeting at this place to-morrow after- 



72 HINGHAM IN THE CIVIL WAR. 

noon, commencing at two o'clock, and that the citizens be re- 
quested to close their places of business at twelve o'clock ; also 
to cause the bells on the meeting-houses to be rung half an hour 
before the meeting. 

" Voted, That all citizens present be requested to act as a rally- 
ing committee to persuade persons who are liable to draft to 
attend the meeting to-morrow afternoon." Adjourned. 

Dec. 31. — A meeting of the citizens of Hingham was held 
this Thursday afternoon, with Crocker Wilder, Esq., as chairman, 
and Israel Whitcomb, secretary. After passing several unimpor- 
tant votes, it was adjourned to meet at seven o'clock, p.m. 

At the evening meeting, Luther Stephenson was chosen to 
preside, in the absence of Mr. Wilder. Eloquent remarks were 
made by the chairman, by Revs. E. Porter Dyer, and J. L. Hatch, 
Col. Seymour, Isaac Barnes, and others. Subsequently it was 
" Voted, To dissolve, with three cheers for the Union." 

Feb. 12, 1864. — At a meeting of the citizens of Hingham, 
held at the Town Hall this Friday evening, Crocker Wilder, 
Esq., was chosen chairman, and Israel Whitcomb, secretary. 

Col. Seymour, treasurer of the Citizens' Recruiting Committee, 
presented his final report, which was read and accepted. 





SUMMARY OF THE REPORT. 








RECEIVED OF THE SOLICITING COMMITTEE, 


$6,093.50. 




Of this amount, one person gave 


$250.00 


^250.00 


it 


one person gave 


150.00 


150.00 


(( 


five persons gave 


100. OO- 


500.00 


i( 


one person gave 


60.00 


60.00 


u 


ten persons gave 


50.00 


500.00 


n 


three persons gave 


40.00 


120.00 


(1 


two persons gave 


30.00 


60.00 


(( 


forty-two persons gave 


25.00 


1,050.00 


(( 


twenty-one persons gave 


20.00 


420.00 


(1 


twenty-five persons gave 


15.00 


375.00 


(< 


one person gave 


13.00 


13.00 


11 


one hundred and thirty-two persons gave 


10.00 


1,320.00 


(( 


three persons gave 


8.00 


24.00 


itc 


one person gave 


7.00 


7.00 


tl 


two hundred and twenty-one persons gave 


5.00 


1,105.00 


(t 


twenty-five persons gave 


3.00 


75.00 


« 


one person gave 


2.50 


2.50 


<l 


twenty-seven persons gave 


2.00 


54.00 


tl 


eight persons gave 


1. 00 


8.00 



$6,093.50 



PROCEEDINGS OF TOWN AND CITIZENS' MEETINGS. jt^ 

This amount does not include any portion of the two thousand 
dollars previously offered by Hon. Albert Fearing, or of the gen- 
erous gift of five hundred dollars by Edward S. Tobey, Esq., of 
Boston. Neither does it take in the proceeds of any fair or 
entertainment, or of the several collections taken up at war 
meetings prior to the appointment of the Citizens' Recruiting 
Committee. 

The credit side of the report shows in detail the amount 
paid for thirty-eight new recruits, and for twenty-six veterans 
who re-enlisted upon the quota of Hingham, with the necessary 
expenses of recruiting the same. 

The meeting was adjourned to Monday evening, 15th inst. 

Feb. 15. — An adjourned meeting of the citizens liable to 
draft, and of others interested in filling the quota of the Town, 
was held at the Town Hall. Col. Seymour gave some additional 
information relating to the receipts and expenditures of the Citi- 
zens' Recruiting Committee ; after which the thanks of the meet- 
ing were presented to the Committee of Twenty for their services 
in filling the quota of the Town under the call of Oct. 17, 1863. 

" Voted, To choose a recruiting committee of seven ; and the 
following persons were appointed, viz. : Israel Whitcomb, David 
Leavitt, Edmund Hersey, 2d, Elijah Shute, Jason W. Whitney, 
William Fearing, 2d, and Charles N. Marsh." 

" Voted, To choose a soliciting committee of thirty to canvass 
the Town for subscriptions to aid in securing recruits for the 
quota of Hingham under the call of the President of the United 
States, dated Feb. r, 1864." 

March 7, 1864. — At the annual Town-meeting, James S. 
Lewis, Esq., moderator, it was 

" Voted That eight hundred dollars of the money raised 
for Town expenses be appropriated, under the direction of the 
selectmen, for Town aid to the families of volunteers. 

" Voted, That the treasurer be authorized to hire eight thou- 
sand dollars for paying "State aid, under the direction of the 
selectmen, 

" Voted, To accept the minority report of the committee to 
whom was referred the subject of allowing David H. Champlin 
the aid granted to drafted men." The report recommends that he 
receive the same benefits granted to drafted men. 



74 



HINGHAM IN THE CIVIL WAR. 



" Voted, To choose a committee consisting of Seth Sprague, 
Demerick Marble,George Hersey, jun., James S. Lewis, and Caleb 
Gill, to audit the accounts of the recruiting officer, agreeably to 
order No. 32, from the Governor of the Commonwealth. 

" Voted, TJiat the treasurer be authorized to hire the sum of 
one thousand dollars to defray the expenses of recruiting in 
anticipation of premiums for volunteers enlisted under said 
order" (32). 

April 1 1, 1864. — At a Town-meeting held this Monday after- 
noon, James S. Lewis, Esq., in the chair, it was 

" Voted, That the Town refund the money contributed by 
individuals, and applied for the purpose of procuring its propor- 
tion of the quota of volunteers in the military service called for 
from the Commonwealth, under the orders of the President of 
the United States, dated Oct. 17, 1863, and Feb. i, 1864, so far 
as it can be done legally, and that no part of said money shall 
be refunded before the first day of August next. 

" Voted, To raise eight thousand dollars for the purpose of 
carrying the above vote into effect, provided such amount shall 
be required. 

" Voted, That the treasurer be authorized, with the advice of 
the selectmen, to hire a sufficient sum of money for the purpose 
of procuring the Town's proportion of the quota of volunteers 
as may be called for from the Commonwealth, under any order 
or call from the President of the United States, issued after the 
first day of March, 1864, provided such sum shall not exceed 
one hundred and twenty-five dollars to each volunteer obtained 
under such call or order." 

As an expression of the citizens of this Town, it was 
" Voted, That the selectmen be authorized to take action in 
procuring and interring the bodies of officers and soldiers belong- 
ing to this Town that may hereafter die in the service. 

" Voted, That the selectmen be requested to petition the 
Legislature, that authority be granted to raise money for defraying 
the expenses of obtaining and interring the bodies of such 
officers and soldiers belonging to this Town as may die in the 
service during the rebellion." 

yune, 17. — Omitting several citizens' meetings which were 



PROCEEDINGS OF TOWN AND CITIZENS' MEETINGS. 



75 



unimportant in their results, an adjourned war-meeting was held 
this evening. 

" Voted, That the enrolled men of this Town be requested to 
pay the sum of fifteen dollars each, for the purpose of securing 
a sufficient number of recruits to fill the quota of the Town in 
anticipation of a call by the President of the United States for 
three hundred thousand men. 

" Voted, To appoint a committee to solicit subscriptions from 
persons liable to draft and from citizens generally. The committee 
were also to take into consideration the correcting of the enrol- 
ment by reporting all cases of permanent disability, &c." 

The following persons were chosen a committee to solicit 
subscriptions, viz. : — 

North Ward. — Andrew J. Gardner, Isaac Gardner, Elijah D. 
Tilden, Albert E. Thayer, Thomas J. Hersey, Edmund Her- 
sey, 2d, and George Lincoln, jun. 

Middle Ward. — Demerick Marble, Elisha Burr, Joseph T. 
Sprague, George Bailey, Loring Jacob, De Witt C. Bates, and 
Reuben H. Corthell. 

SoutJi Ward. — Elpalet L. Gushing, William Gushing, 
Joshua D. Turner, William C. Wilder, Elijah Shute, Edmund 
Hobart, Edwin Tower, and Joseph H. Wilder. 

Jicly 30. — A meeting of the citizens liable to draft was held 
for the purpose of making arrangements to fill the quota of the 
Town under the last call. By vote of those present De Witt 
C. Bates was chosen to solicit subscriptions. 

Aug. 8, 1864. — At a meeting of the citizens liable to draft, 
and others interested in filling the quota, a subscription paper 
was circulated from which was realized upwards of one thousand 
dollars. Several gentlemen present expressed their intention 
of procuring substitutes, and it was voted to allow all such per- 
sons the sum of $250 from the recruiting fund. Up to this 
time the committee appointed to solicit subscriptions reported 
that they had succeeded in raising between five and six thousand 
dollars towards obtaining recruits. 

Aug. 13. — A citizens' meeting was held for the purpose of 
obtaining home recruits for coast defence for one year's service. 

Aug. 20. — An adjourned meeting of those liable to draft, and 



76 HINGHAM IN THE CIVIL WAR. 

of all Others interested in filling the quota of the Town, was held 
this evening. It was announced as " the last meeting (unless 
more encouragement be given) that will be held -before the 
draft." A statement was made showing the number of men 
required to fill the quota of the Town. To meet this demand, a 
deposit had been made with the State to secure a proportion 
of the number required. Eight substitutes, also, had recently- 
been furnished by persons who were liable to be drafted, and 
fifteen or more credits were expected from enlistments in the navy. 

Dec. 2^, 1864. — In accordance with an Act of the Massa- 
chusetts Legislature concerning the Militia, approved May 14, 
1864, a meeting of the citizens of Hingham liable to military 
duty was held at the Town Hall for the purpose of forming a 
company and choosing a captain. Henry Jones was unani- 
mously elected to the office, but the Act was shortly afterwards 
suspended, and the company never met for parade or military 
drill. Capt. Jones was well qualified for the honor conferred 
upon him, having seen three years of active service at the front 
with the Eighteenth Regiment M.V.I. , of the Army of the Poto- 
mac. 

March 6, 1865. — At the annual Town-meeting, James S. 
Lewis, Esq., moderator, it was voted that the treasurer be au- 
thorized to hire ^9,000, with the approbation of the selectmen, 
for the payment of State aid, and that $800 of the amount raised 
for Town expenses be appropriated, under the direction of the 
selectmen, for Town aid. 

The Town treasurer, with the advice of the selectmen, was 
also authorized to hire a sufficient sum of money for procuring 
the Town's proportion of volunteers called for from the Com- 
monwealth, or under any call or order from the President of the 
United States, issued after the first day of March, 1865, provided 
such sum shall not exceed one hundred and twenty-five dollars 
to each recruit obtained under such call or order. 

" Voted, That $1,000 of the money raised for Town expenses be 
appropriated for recruiting purposes if necessary." 



PROCEEDINGS OF TOWN AND CITIZENS' MEETINGS. 77 

THE GREAT NATIONAL CALAMITY. 

April 17, 1865. — Monday evening, a meeting of the inhabit- 
ants of Hingham was held at the request of the selectmen, "to 
decide what action the Town will take in relation to the great 
national calamity. The meeting was called to order by Demerick 
Marble, Esq., chairman of the board of selectmen, who read the 
address issued by the acting secretary of state to the people of 
the United States, inviting thern to meet in their respective 
places of worship at the hour of the funeral services of the late 
lamented Chief Magistrate for the purpose of solemnizing the 
occasion with appropriate ceremonies." 

James S. Lewis, Esq., was chairman of the meeting, and De 
Witt C. Bates, secretary. 

Rev. Calvin Lincoln addressed the throne of grace in words 
befitting the occasion. 

Remarks by Rev. Jonathan Tilson, Rev. Calvin Lincoln, Rev. 
Joshua YoUng, Messrs. Bela T. Sprague, Luther Stephenson, 
and Edwin Wilder, 2d, followed. 

The meeting voted unanimously to adopt measures for a 
proper observance of the day ; and a committee, consisting of 
Messrs. Edwin Wilder, 2d, Demerick Marble, John Stephenson, 
Joseph Jacob, jun., John Cushing, and Charles N. Marsh, was 
chosen to report a plan of action for the consideration of those 
present. 

The committee subsequently reported, recommending that on 
Wednesday, in conformity with the request of the secretary of 
state, a union service be held in the meeting-house of the First 
Parish ; and that a committee of nine be chosen to make the 
necessary arrangements. The report was adopted, and the follow- 
ing persons were appointed a committee ; viz., John Todd, 
Joseph Ripley, Charles N. Marsh, John Stephenson, David 
Leavitt, John K. Corthell, Andrew W. Dunbar, Elijah Shute, and 
Ezra Wilder. The selectmen were added to the committee. 



yS HINGHAM IN THE CIVIL WAR. 



THE FUNERAL CEREMONIES 

took place at the old meeting-house, Wednesday, April 19, 
commencing at 12 o'clock, m. The exercises consisted of 
prayer, reading of the Scriptures, singing by the choir, and a 
funeral discourse by Rev. Mr. Young of the Third Parish. All 
the clergymen of the Town took part in the religious exercises. 
The church was appropriately draped in mourning, and pews and 
aisles were filled to overflowing. The galleries were reserved 
for the scholars of the public schools. 

At the conclusion of the services in the church, a procession 
was formed, consisting of the scholars, followed by a funeral car, 
and a large number of the inhabitants of the Town. The 
procession moved first to Fountain Square, and thence to the 
cemetery in the rear of the church, where, near the spot on 
which the Soldiers' and Sailors' Monument has since been erected, 
the last sad duties of the hour were performed, including appro- 
priate vocal music by the children, and remarks by the clergymen 
and others. 

The day was mild and pleasant. In the different parts of the 
Town, flags and bunting were displayed at half-mast, and the 
public buildings, as well as many private residences, were draped 
with the emblems of mourning. Bells were tolled at morning, 
noon, and night, and minute-guns were fired from the hill in the 
rear of the north school-house at the time of the services. It 
was a solemn day, and one long to be remembered. Never before 
were the people called upon to grieve for one on whom they 
placed greater reliance as a statesman, or for one whom they 
loved and respected more than Abraham Lincoln. 




itli^ 



CHAPTER III. 

DRAFTS AND SUBSTITUTES. 

The Drafts — Act of Congress regulating Enrolments — Number of Persons enrolled in 
Hingham — The Draft at Taunton — List of the Drafted — List of Persons exempted by- 
Payment of Commutation — Copy of Notice to Persons drafted — Copy of Receipt for 
Money paid for Commutation — Copy of Certificate of Non-Liability given by Board of 
Enrolment — Opening of Recruiting-Office — Re-enlistments from the Thirty-second 
Regiment — Substitutes. 

DURING the Civil War four drafts were appointed by the 
national government, and enforced tliroughout the loyal 
States as follow, viz. : — 

First in July, 1863.^ This draft was for one-fifth of the whole 
number registered under theyfr.?/ class. 

The second draft took place in April, 1864, for deficiencies 
under calls for seven hundred thousand men. 

The third, in September, 1864, for deficiencies under the call 
of July 18, 1864, for five hundred thousand men. 

The fourth, in February, 1865, for deficiencies under the call 
of Dec. 19, 1864, for three hundred thousand men. 

Though admitted to be equitable and just, yet in no section of 
the country did the " draft " find hearty sympathy or approval 
in the popular mind. The prevailing love of freedom forbade a 
coerced or unwilling service ; and so averse was public senti- 
ment to acts of conscription, that the most determined and per- 
severing efforts were everywhere made to avoid the draft, and 
fill the quotas required by voluntary enlistments. To a large 
extent, these efforts were crowned with the most gratifying suc- 

1 Congress had passed an Act requiring that enrolments be made in two classes ; the first 
embracing those liable to do military duty between twenty years and thirty-five years of age ; 
and all unmarried persons liable to military service over thirty-five years and under forty-five 
years of age. 

The second class included all married persons liable to do military duty between thirty-five 
years and forty-five years of age. 



go HINGHAM IN THE CIVIL WAR. 

cess, and the proportion of men forced into the ranks through 
the unavoidable decree of the draft must have been small indeed. 

In order to the proper apportionment of the number of men 
to be furnished, an enrolment was made of all male citizens in 
the State, in accordance with the Act of Congress before men- 
tioned. Charles N. Marsh, Esq., was appointed Enrolling 
Officer for the town of Hingham, and entered upon his work in 
June, 1863. 

The result was as follows, viz. : — 

Whole number of persons enrolled, 679. 

First class, including all between the ages of twenty and 
thirty-five, and all single men and widowers from thirty-five to 
forty-five years of age, 341. 

Second class, including all married men from thirty-five to 
forty-five years of age, 175. 

Third class, including those now in the service or discharged, 
163. 

Sixteen claimed residence in other cities or towns, and sixty- 
three claimed exemption as aliens. 

With a single exception, all the quotas of Hingham were filled 
by voluntary enlistments. The draft for a deficiency was made 
at Taunton, July 20, 1863, when one hundred names, enrolled 
under the first class, were drawn as follow, viz. : — 

Reuben Sprague, Caleb Marsh, 

William Fearing, 2d, John F. Welsh, 

John C. Fearing, John O. Remington, 

Morallus Lane, Ambrose Leach, 
Ebenezer C. Ripley, • Josiah Q. Gardner, 

Alanson Crosby, Smith Richardson, 

Charles C. Hersey, Atkinson Nye, 

Francis H. Stowell, Thomas McGlone, 

Samuel Lemon, John Lemon, 

Caleb C. White, Edwin W. Beal, 

Don Pedro Wilson, Andrew C. Cushing, 

Hosea B. Hersey, Edward Pyne, 

William K. Gould, Edward O. Farmer, 

Benjamin Thomas, Joseph H. Litchfield, 

George Fox, Thomas Stephenson, 



DRAFTS AND SUBSTITUTES. 



8i 



Henry W. Ripley, 
Levi Hersey, 
George Hobart, 
William C. Miller, 
John Hines, 
Ebenezer C. Hobart, 
George Lang, 
Patrick Fee, 
George R. Ripley, 
Thomas Baeezil, 
Leonard Birch, 
Albert T. Hutchins, 
Hiram T. Howard, 
George W. Young, 
Warren Remington, 
Timothy Shea, 
William H. Starr, 
Leavitt Sprague, 2d, 
Caleb F. Gardner, 
David Fearing, jun., 
Edwin Wilder, 2d, 
John White, 
Joseph Curtis, 
Edward S. Gushing, 
William Coughlan, 
Henry Hobart; 
Theophilus Gushing, jun., 
Edmund Hersey, 2d, 
David Thaxter, 
Joshua Jacob, jun., 
Charles Stephenson, 
Joseph H. Lincoln, 
William C. Wilder, 
Seth S. Hersey, jun., 
Matthew Clynch, 



Daniel W. Sprague, 
Sewall Pugsley, 
Richard Staples, 
Benjamin L. Gushing, 
Lincoln B. Bicknell, 
Josiah S. Remington, 
Peter McGlone, 
Edward C. Wilder, 
James K. Young, 
John Pyne, 
George W. Tilden, 
William T. Nelson, 
Laban O. Beal, 
Elijah W. Burr, 
Barzillai Lincoln, 
John Wilder, 
Charles H. Eldredge, 
Daniel Bowen, 
Thomas Murray, 
Ebed Sprague, jun., 
Edwin H. Bates, 
Thomas L. Sprague, 
Howard Litchfield, jun., 
Stephen P. Gould, 
Redmond Welsh, 
George A. Newhall, 
James M. Garland, 
Albert Whiton, 
Isaac B. Miller, 
Freeman Pugsley, 
Charles Mayhew, 
James S. King, 
Willard Snow, 
Thomas J. Hersey, 
George R. Turner. 



So far as known, three only joined the army under the requisi- 
tion of this draft ; viz., William K. Gould, Sewall Pugsley, and Don 



II 



82 



RING HAM m THE CIVIL WAR. 



Pedro Wilson. A very large majority was excused for dis- 
ability ; and the remainder either exempted by provisions of 
the law, or by payment of the sum required for commutation. 
Among the latter were the following : — 



Alan son Crosby, 
Andrew C. Gushing, 
Edward S. Gushing, 
William Fearing, 2d, 
Josiah L. Gardner, 
Seth S. Hersey, jun., 
Thomas Jones Hersey, 
Ebenezer G. Hobart, 



Henry Hobart, 
James S. King, 
Edward Pyne, 
Willard Snow, 
William H. Starr, 
George W. Tilden, 
George W. Young, 



Of natives, but at the time non-residents of Hingham, the 
draft included, — 



Gustavus Abbott, 
Gharles W. Bassett, 
Elijah Beal, 
Robert Burr, 
Henry Damon, 
Henry L. Fearing, 
Timothy Foster, 
Henry Kenerson, 
George Lane, 
Parker E. Lane, 
William Lane, 
Weston Lewis, 



Amasa Lincoln, 
Solomon Lincoln, jun., 
Thomas W. Lincoln, 
David Ripley, 
Levi B. Ripley, 
Joseph S. Sprague, 
Leonard Sprague, 
Samuel Sprague, 
Levi Stearns, 
James Tilden, 
Albert T. Whiting, 
Dexter B. Whiton. 



COPY OF THE OFFICIAL NOTICE ADDRESSED TO THE PERSONS 

DRAFTED. 
[Form 39.] 

Provost Marshal's Office, Second District, State of Mass., 

July 20, 1863. 
To A. B., Hingham. 

Sir, — You are hereby notified that you were, on the twentieth day of July, 
1863, legally drafted in the service of the United States for the period of 
three years, in accordance with the provisions of the Act of Congress, for 
" enrolling and calling out the National Forces, and for other purposes," ap- 
proved March 3, 1863. You will accordingly report, on or before the 8th of 



DRAFTS AND SUBSTITUTES. 



83 



August, at the place of rendezvous, in Taunton, or be deemed a deserter, 
and be subject to the penalty prescribed therefor by the Rules and Articles 
of War. 

Transportation will be furnished you on presenting this notification at 
Hingham Station, on the S. S. R. R., or at the station nearest your place of 
residence. 

[Signed] J. W. D. Hall, 

Provost Marshal, Second District of Mass. 

COPY OF RECEIPT FOR THE SUM PAID FOR COMMUTATION. 

[No. 44.] 
Second Massachusetts Collection District. 
Received at Milton on the thirteenth day of August, 1863, from A. B., of 
Hingham, who was drafted into the service of the United States, on the 
second day of July, 1863, from the Second Congressional District of the State 
of Massachusetts, the sum of three hundred ($300) dollars, to obtain, under 
Section 13 of the "Act for enrolling and calling out the National Forces, 
and for other purposes, approved March 3, 1863," discharge from further 
liability under this draft. 

Signed in TripHcate. 

C. P. Huntington, Receiver of Commutation Money. 

[Form 31.] 

CERTIFICATE OF NON-LIABILITY TO BE GIVEN BY THE BOARD OF 

ENROLMENT. 

We, the subscribers, composing the Board of Enrolment of the Second 
District of the State of Massachusetts, provided for in Section 8, Act of 
Congress "for enrolling and calling out the National Forces," approved 
March 3, 1863, hereby certify that A. B., of Hingham, Plymouth County, 
State of Massachusetts, having given satisfactory evidence that he is not 
properly subject to do military duty, as required by said Act, by reason of 
having paid three hundred dollars, is exempt from all liability to military 
duty for the term of this draft. 

[Signed] J. W. D. Hall, 

Provost Marshal and President of Board of Enrolment. 

Dated at Taunton, this thirteenth day of August, 1863. 

Members of the Thirty-second Regiment, who enlisted as veteran volunteers, 
and who were counted on the quota of the Town of Hingham, being regu- 
larly fnustered into the service of the United States for three years from 
Jan. 5, 1864: — 

Ephraim Anderson, William Breen, 

Otis L. Battles, John C. Chadbourn, 



84 HINGHAM IN THE CIVIL WAR. 

Jacob G. Gushing, Frank H. Miller, 

William L. Dawes, Peter Ourish, 

John W. Eldredge, Harvey M. Pratt, 

Thomas L. French, William Riley, 

Edwin Hersey, Charles H. F. Stodder, 

Wallace Humphrey, Edgar P. Stodder, 

Gardner Jones, Washington I. Stodder, 

James McCarty, Nathaniel Wilder, 2d, 

Charles S. Meade, George A. Wolfe. 

Under date of Oct. 27, 1863, the President of the United 
States issued a call for 300,000 volunteers to serve for three 
years, or during the war. Of this number, the State of Massa- 
chusetts was to furnish 15,126, the quota of the town of Hing- 
ham being 50. The general order provided, " that, in case this 
number was not raised by voluntary enlistment, a draft would 
be ordered to supply the deficiency, which draft would com- 
mence on the fifth day of the January following." 

To fill the quota, and avoid the draft, our citizens labored with 
indefatigable perseverance. In addition to the bounty of three 
hundred and twenty-five dollars offered by the State, money was 
appropriated by the Town, and contributed by private subscrip- 
tions. A recruiting office was opened in Lincoln's Building, Col. 
Edward Cazneau was appointed recruiting officer. Town and 
Citizens' meetings were frequent and spirited, a Citizens' Com- 
mittee was raised, a recruiting agent was appointed in Boston, 
and every exertion made to secure the end desired. Before the 
time assigned for the draft, the quota was full. The recruiting 
officer had forwarded forty-two volunteers to camp, and the 
re-enlistment of twenty-two soldiers from the Thirty-second 
Regiment swelled the total beyond the number required. 

The draft in April, 1864. — The quota of Massachusetts on the 
last call of the national government for 200,000 men was 10,639. 
There was a deficiency on the part of the State, up to March i, 
amounting to 9,953 men, making the total required 20,592. Of 
these, 33 were to be furnished by the Town of Hingham. This 
number was materially reduced by the balance standing in our 
favor ; and the remainder, through the labors of the recruiting 



DRAFTS AND SUBSTITUTES. 



85 



officer, and the committee chosen by the citizens, was soon 
obtained. 

In May, 1864, the Enrolment Act was amended by Congress, 
allowing no exemption because of social relations, and consoli- 
dating the first and second classes ; thus making all between 
the ages of twenty and forty-five equally liable to the draft. 

TJie draft in September, 1864. — Under this draft the quota of 
Hingham was seventy-two. Credit being allowed for naval 
enlistments, the number required from Massachusetts was soon 
obtained, with a balance of 21,675 i^^ i^s favor. This surplus 
was apportioned among the several towns and cities as far as 
practicable, and the balance remained credited to the State at 
large. 

Through the successful labors of the recruiting officer, Charles 
N. Marsh, Esq., and the Citizens' Committee, with the aid derived 
from numerous enlistments from the Town in the navy, and the 
share of the surplus men due from the State at large, the quota 
of Hingham was filled before the day appointed for the draft. 

To date of Oct. i, 1864, the aggregate of the quotas and 
deficiencies of the Town, from the time of the call in February, 
1864, was 189 : the number actually furnished was 200 ; leaving 
a surplus of 11 men, which, on the ist of December, was 
increased to 26 men. 

SUBSTITUTES, 

The Conscription Law provided that any man desiring a dis- 
charge for three years might furnish a substitute, the average 
cost of such being about seven hundred dollars. A portion of 
this amount, however, was afterwards refunded. 

The law also made provision for a. class termed "representa- 
tive substitutes." Any enrolled man, after examination at the 
office of the provost marshal, and being pronounced physically 
unfit for military service, was authorized to provide a " repre- 
sentative substitute," and obtain his discharge for a term of three 
years. When a recruit was thus furnished, the sum of one hun- 
dred and twenty-five dollars was contributed by the Town, and 
seventy-five dollars from the enrolment fund. 

The order from the provost marshal provided further, that 



86 



HINGHAM IN THE CIVIL WAR. 



any person not liable to a draft might deposit one hundred and 
twenty-five dollars with the State treasurer, and be entitled to a 
representative recruit, who should be credited to the Town in 
which the person resided, unless such Town might be already 
credited with one-fourth the number required to fill its quota ; in 
which case the representative would be credited ta the State at 
large. Ladies were authorized to furnish substitutes under 
similar conditions. 

Substitutes, voluntary or representative, were furnished by the 
following persons, viz, : — 



PRINCIPAL. 



Amos B. Bates, 
DeWitt C. Bates, 
Caleb G. Beal, 
Ambrose Beech, 
E. Waters Burr, 
Isaac Gardner, 2d, 
Tobias O. Gardner, 
W. Allan Gay, 
Theodore R. Glover, 
George P. Hay ward, 
David R. Hersey, 
Charles Howard, 
David Jacob, 
Joseph Jacob, jun., 
Loring Jacob, 
Arthur Lincoln, 
George Lincoln, jun., 
Solomon Lincoln, jun,, 
Enos Loring, 
Thomas F. Whiton, 
William C. Wilder, 



SUBSTITUTE. 



John M. Whittier, 
Dennis Riley, 
John Manill, 



Adolph Wagner, 



Vernon W, Andrews, 
John Stuart, 
Joseph T. King, 
Martin Callahan, 
John H. Buxton, 
John Domick, 
Christian Veil, 

Jerry Hurley, 

Job Nicholas. 



ABRAHAM LINCOLN. 



The Compilers of this volume have thought it would be appropriate to its 
object to embrace in it a brief sketch of Abraham Linxoln, our great leader 
in the war of the rebellion. Believing that we have a local interest, also, 
in all that pertains to his life and character, and that a brief tribute to his 
memory will be in harmony with our work, we have requested Mr. Arthur 
Lincoln of this town to prepare such a sketch, which is subjoined. 





9 

( 1-2 



NITED STATES 



CHAPTER IV. 



ABRAHAM LINCOLN. 



NO name in American history can be mentioned which more 
quickly excites the tenderest emotions of our hearts than 
that of Abraham Lincohi. How deep the affection, how strong 
the sympathy it awakens, and how kind the thought it inspires ! 
We revere the name of Washington, and are grateful for his noble 
services for his country's good ; we honor the name of Franklin 
for his profound wisdom and strong practical sense ; we are 
proud of the name of Webster, and admire his gigantic intellect 
and transcendent eloquence ; but we love the name of Lincoln, 
and cherish his memory for the martyrdom he suffered for us. 
We realize that he was a part of our very selves, and appreciate 
the many virtues of his mind and heart. 

There seems more or less of chance in the life of every man ; 
and it is undoubtedly true, so far as Mr. Lincoln's nomination 
to the Presidency was concerned, that he was selected for his 
" availability," and favored by fortune. Tried by the test of 
experience, how could he have expected the honor, in competi- 
tion with the chiefs of the nation, who had served the public for 
many years, and whose names were known throughout the land ! 
Up to the time of his nomination, there was little of chance in 
his life ; but by toil, through trial and adversity, under the most 
discouraging circumstances, he worked his own way, with few 
teachers, few books, and few companions, from obscurity to the 
front rank among men. 

There is, however, less of chance in the lives of most men 
than we commonly suppose. All are, to a great extent, self- 
made, and hold their destinies in their own hands. It was 
peculiarly so with Abraham Lincohi. No man was ever more 
entitled to the distinction of being called a self-made man than 

12 



90 



HINGHAM IN THE CIVIL WAR. 



he, and no one among us has raised himself to so high an emi- 
nence from so humble a beginning. The story of his life is a 
remarkable one, so romantic withal, and yet so real. It very 
naturally finds. its place in any record of the soldiers and sailors, 
whom he regarded with so much interest, and with whom he 
was so intimately associated and worked so faithfully during the 
nation's great struggle for existence. If it be a fact (for which 
our historians assure us we have strong presumptive evidence ' 
for believing), that the blood of the Pennsylvania Lincolns 
flowed in his veins, and that the Lincolns everywhere are of 
the same stock, and all descended from the settlers of Hingham, 
how appropriate it seems to set apart a portion of these pages 
to honor his name, in connection with the history of the services 
of our own soldiers and sailors ! 

It becomes, therefore, an interesting fact that the names of 
the two great chief magistrates, John Albion Andrew and Abra- 
ham Lincoln, the head of our own Commonwealth and the head 
of the Nation, who so closely resembled each other in many great 
qualities, should be so intimately connected with our own town. 
We are proud to record the names of two such patriots and 
martyrs in this volume. 

Abraham Lincoln, the son of Thomas and Nancy (Hanks) 
Lincoln, was born in that part of Hardin County, Kentucky, 
now embraced by the lines of the recently formed County of 
Larue, Feb. 12, 1809. The history of the first twenty-one years 
of his life is soon told, and, as he himself said, is perfectly 
characterized by a single line of Gray's Elegy. 

"The short and simple annals of the poor." 

He was born in a rude log-cabin, and lived in one for the first 
seven years of his backwoods life. In his eighth year his father 
removed to Indiana, and settled near the present town of Gentry- 
ville. Here the boy was engaged chiefly in farm-work, labor for 
hire, clearing forests and similar occupations. Here he remained 
for thirteen years. The monotony of his life was only once 
broken by a voyage by river to the sugar plantations around New 
Orleans, whither he went in charge of a flat boat and cargo. At 
twenty-one years of age, the family removed to Macon County, 



ABRAHAM LINCOLN. 



91 



Illinois, where they again constructed and lived in a log-cabin. 
During all these years he had no advantages of education. His 
mother died in his tenth year. His father could neither read 
nor write, and Abraham himself had only learned to read, write, 
and cipher. Yet in these years he had laid the foundations for 
that high eminence to which he afterwards attained. He had 
been a constant reader of the Bible, and from its pages and a 
few volumes of American biography, — the lives of Washington, 
Franklin, Clay, and a few others, — he had learned the lessons 
which enabled him to reach to the highest statesmanship. 

After the removal to Illinois he started out on a new life, 
although his occupation for a while was of the humblest kind. 
He was engaged in splitting rails, acting as clerk in a country 
store, and became a soldier and captain in the Black Hawk War. 
Hitherto his life had flowed on like a tranquil stream, though 
growing wider and deeper as it neared the great centres of civ- 
ilization ; and now with rapid strides he pushes his way on to 
fame. He had become very popular as a political debater, when, 
in 1834, he was elected to the Legislature of Illinois. He began 
to study law aboutthe same time, and, in 1836, was admitted to 
the bar. He was married, in the thirty-third year of his age, to 
Miss Mary Todd of Lexington, Kentucky. On Dec. 6, 1847, he 
was elected a member of Congress. On Jan. 17, 185 1, his father 
died. In 1858, he went through his memorable political cam- 
paign with Hon. Stephen A. Douglas. They canvassed the State 
in their contest for the senatorship. In his debates with Mr. 
Douglas, Mr. Lincoln was the victor, in popular estimation, and 
received a majority of the popular votes, although he lost the 
election on the ballot in the legislature, in consequence of a 
peculiar apportionment of the legislative districts. But the bat- 
tle was to him a Bunker Hill fight, — a defeat with all the ele- 
ments of victory. In June, i860, the new Republican party 
assembled in convention in Chicago, and Mr. Lincoln was nomi- 
nated for the Presidency. Now for the first time he is conscious 
of the great mission which awaits him. Truly the hand of God 
seems to have been in the selection. For what could have dic- 
tated the choice, which was made, to the minds of men, in the 
presence of the tried and trusted statesmen and leaders of the 



92 



HINGHAM IN THE CIVIL WAR. 



nation who were gathered on that platform His course seems 
to have been thus far directed by some invisible hand ; for un- 
consciously he had pushed his way from the humblest obscurity, 
steadily and persistently, through the greatest trials, into national 
recognition, as if destined for the sceptre now to be placed in his 
hand. He pauses under the new and great responsibility which 
presses upon him, and in sad and serious thought and fervent 
prayer awaits the issue, and prepares for the work to come. 

The triumphant election of Nov. 6, i860, soon followed ; and 
in March following, Abraham Lincoln was inaugurated President 
of the United States. What a spectacle is this in the National 
Capitol at Washington ! Senators, representatives, judges of 
the highest courts of judicature, foreign diplomates, governors, 
— the eminent and distinguished men of the land, assembled to 
witness the august ceremonies, and the central figure of them 
all, — he, the humble citizen from the back-woods, who has 
passed half of his life in the wilderness. The President now 
fully recognized the fact that he was an instrument in the hand 
of God to accomplish a great purpose. He believed himself a 
pilot at the ship's helm. He knew not what storms would rock, 
nor what tempests assail her ; but, apprehending danger, he had 
bidden adieu to the peaceful scenes of home, and firmly set his 
hand to the work, and plunged into the trial and turmoil of 
official life, and the struggle of the great rebellion. How sad 
seem now his parting words to his neighbors in Springfield, 
*' My friends, I know not how soon I shall see you again " ! 

How nobly he did his work we all know. The history of Mr, 
Lincoln's life during the four succeeding years is the history of 
the war itself, and is largely told in the sketches of the soldiers 
and sailors whose names are recorded in this volume. The first 
gun from Sumter roused the people to arms. The President's call 
for men, the quick response of our own great war Governor, and 
the march of our troops to the seat of war, the clash of arms, the 
bloody battles, the tedious waitings, the sickness, imprisonments, 
and deaths that followed, the reverses, the successes, and the 
final overthrow of the rebellion that brought peace and victory to 
our arms, all are fresh in our minds ; -and how faithful and honest 
and patient through the whole was our leader ! How confident in 



ABRAHAM LINCOLN. 



93 



the justice of our cause, how hopeful in the result, and how 
devoted to the soldiers and sailors who fought for it ! How grand 
to him must have been the language of his own emancipation 
proclamation, " All persons held as slaves . . . are, 
AND henceforward SHALL BE, FREE ! " And how great the 
privilege of freeing four millions of African bondmen, upon which 
action he invoked the " considerate judgment of mankind, 
AND the GRACIOUS FAVOR OF ALMIGHTY GoD "! How gratifying 
to him, in the midst of all these gigantic military campaigns, 
must have been his overwhelming re-election, and how glorious 
to him the final success of our arms! 

But the bells had scarcely rung out to the nation the glad 
tidings of our great joy, — the fall of Richmond, the surrender of 
Lee, and the end of the rebellion, — when they tolled a nation's 
grief for the death of the great and good President, struck down 
by the hand of an assassin. He died on the fourteenth day of 
April, 1865 ; and the blood that flowed from his wounds sealed 
deep in our hearts the love and affection we bore him, and closed 
the lips of his traducers forever. The whole world rose up in 
sympathy, and exclaimed, he 

" Hatli borne bis faculties so meek, hath been 
So clear in his great office, that his virtues 
Will plead like angels, trumpet-tongued, against 
The deep damnation of his taking off." 

So ended the life of Abraham Lincoln. He had fought a 
good fight ; he had fulfilled his mission ; he had seen the success- 
ful end of his work. As his funeral procession moved in silence 
across the land, the nations of the earth paid solemn tribute to 
the dead. Kings and queens sent sympathetic lines from their 
own hands, and all races and classes of men were moved to 
words of reverence and respect. His name is now in the affec- 
tionate keeping of mankind. 

Mr. Lincoln was not regarded as a man of genius, and cer- 
tainly not of the highest culture ; but he had sound common 
sense, and a strong and decided purpose ; he was fertile in 
practical expedients ; simple, yet grand ; kind, yet firm ; rough 
somewhat in exterior, yet . gentle and sympathetic in action ; 
sagacious, and, above all, honest and pure in heart. 



94 HINGHAM IN THE CIVIL WAR. 

" His life was gentle, and the elements 
So mixed in him, that Nature might stand up, 
And say to all the world. This was a j/ian ! " 

His speeches were singularly terse and effective. His admin- 
istration was wise and practical. No suspicion of his integrity in 
office ever entered the mind of friend or foe. He had the tact — 
nay, the power as if inspired — of seeming to lead while he fol- 
lowed the people's will. This was especially marked in his 
course with regard to issuing the emancipation proclamation. 
He knew the people were ready for it, and would sustain him in 
issuing it. More sagacious than they, he anticipated their wants, 
and insisted at last, against the judgment of many wise men, in 
delaying the proclamation no longer. The result showed how 
wisely he had interpreted their own will, and how he really fol- 
lowed, though seeming to be in adVance of, their own opinion. It 
was well, perhaps, for the republic, that, during the war, it had so 
genuine a son of the soil to direct its armies and guide its coun- 
sels. It indicated more fully to despotic governments abroad the 
strength of our institutions and the worth of our men. Our 
duty now is to insist that this Union, which he did so much to 
preserve, must and shall be maintained. If every one works, as 
he did, for the common good, we cannot fail ; and future genera- 
tions will enjoy the blessings of a government " of the people, 
by the people, and for the people," which " shall not perish from 
the earth ; " and, as they look back through the centuries, will 
find no brighter name to mark this period of our country's 
history than that of Abraham Lincoln. 







CHAPTER V. 



THE LINCOLN LIGHT INFANTRY. 



Introductory — The Lincoln Light Infantry — Telegraph Despatch from Gov. Andrew — Roll 
of Members and Volunteers — Public Exercises and Incidents on leaving Hingham — Arri- 
val in Boston — Departure — Passage to Fortress Monroe — Additional Volunteers — 
Leave Hingham, and embark at Boston by Steamer " Cambridge " — Arrival and joining 
of the Company at Fortress Monroe — Five Weeks at Fortress Monroe — Newport News 
— Expiration of Term of Enlistment — Embark at Fortress Monroe for Boston — Recep- 
tion in Boston — Arrival and Reception at Hingham — History of the Company. 

IT is no part of the object of the present volume to discuss 
the causes which, in the process of time, slowly but steadily 
co-operated in bringing upon our country the late civil war. It 
is sufficient to say, that from the time of the attack on Fort Sum- 
ter, on the 1 2th of April, 1861, to the surrender of Gen. Lee, on the 
9th of April, 1865, — a period of nearly four years, — one sec- 
tion of the United States was arrayed in deadly hostility against 
the other. The North saw in the issue national life or national 
death ; and, with all the earnest patriotism of the fathers in their 
first great struggle for liberty, every thing dear was brought to 
the altar of freedom and an undivided Union. 

The rich gave of their wealth without measure ; and the poor 
in the same liberal spirit from their limited savings, — the result 
of the toil and self-denial of years. To this — and more than 
all else — was added the blood of her- sons, her hope and pride, 
counting nothing dear when offered for an inheritance free and 
undivided. 

With the local events of these years of darkness and trial we 
are now to deal. Instances of marked heroism in battle, the 
giving up of life by wounds or disease in the hospital, the dying 
by sickness or starvation of the prisoner in the hands of the foe, 
the trials and sufferings of the wounded, the wearisome march, 
the privations of camp-life, sustained on the part of the sons of 



96 



HINGHAM IN THE CIVIL WAR. 



Hingham, and those who enhsted in the Town's behalf, make up 
the brilliant record to the preservation and perpetuity of which 
the following pages will be devoted. 

As before stated, the attack on Fort Sumter was made April 
12 ; and on Tuesday, April i6, occurred the first warlike move- 
ment in Hingham, from which the history of the Town in its 
relation to the civil war must bear date. It was on this day that 
the field and staff officers of the various regiments of the M. V. M. 
in the vicinity of Boston met in council at the Governor's room 
in the State House ; and the situation of the nation, condition of 
the military of the State, movement of troops, &c., were there 
fully discussed. 

THE LINCOLN LIGHT INFANTRY. 

On the dissolution of the meeting, Lieut.-col. Hawkes Fearing 
of the Fourth Regiment M. V. M., who had been present and 
taken part in the deliberations, came directly to Hingham, and 
caused to be called and attended a meeting of the Lincoln Light 
Infantry at the armory in the evening. He then immediately 
returned to Boston, and reported for duty at headquarters, Fan- 
euil Hall. 

The situation was critical, and the needs of the moment immedi- 
ate and imperative. The call for aid was the call of the country ; 
and it was soon apparent that the alternative presented was but 
a simple unit. It was a claim on the patriotism of the company 
that a sense of honor forbade the setting aside. They were 
bound to respond to the summons, and a vote was passed accord- 
ingly. 

Tuesday night and the forenoon of the following day was the 
only time allowed for the arrangement of their affairs, the com- 
pletion of the necessary preparations, and the taking leave of 
their friends. The captain was sick ; but the remaining officers, 
in a spirit of the most genuine patriotism, came promptly for- 
ward and offered, for the extremities of the hour, any service 
which might be required at their hands. With a young family 
relying on him for support and counsel, the situation of Lieut. 
Stephenson. in accepting the command thus suddenly and unex- 
pectedly imposed was one of peculiar trial. Between the ties 



THE LINCOLN LIGHT INFANTRY. 



97 



of kindred and the claims of affection on the one hand, and the 
call of the country for support on the other, he and his band of 
noble men, with true patriotism, decided to do battle for freedom 
and their native land. As they went from home, their destina- 
tion was wholly unknown, the time of absence uncertain, the 
nature of their service could not be foreseen, and the future was 
shrouded in darkness and doubt. 

During the day the following official despatch was received by 
telegraph : — 

"April i6, 1861. 
Luther Stephenson, jun., 

Capt. Sprague is discharged. You will report in Boston with the Hing- 

ham company ^by first train. 

John A. Andrew. 

The Stars and Stripes waved from the public buildings, and 
uniformed soldiers were hastening to and fro in busy prepara- 
tion for their departure. At one o'clock, p.m., of Wednesday, the 
members and volunteers assembled at the armorv at Hingham 
Centre, where they were met by Rev. Calvin Lincoln, who com- 
mended them to the care and protection of the God of their 
fathers in earnest and impressive prayer. At four o'clock the 
line was formed ; and the company, forty-two in number, took up 
their line of march, passing down Main Street, attended by hun- 
dreds of men, women, and children, amid the ringing of the 
church-bells, the waving of handkerchiefs from the dwellings as 
they passed, and cheered by the frequent and hearty huzzas of 
the gathering multitude. As they halted near the depot, each 
man was presented with a wreath of flowers by the scholars of 
the North School. They were also addressed by Col. Charles 
W. Seymour, Rev. E. Porter Dyer, James S. Lewis, Esq.. and 
Mr. Joel B. Seymour. Rev. Joseph Richardson offered in their 
behalf a fervent and affecting prayer ; when, stepping on board 
the waiting train, prepared to meet whatever the future might 
decree, they left the town, followed by the tears, cheers, and 
benedictions of the assembled multitude. 

The following is the roll of the Regular Members and the 
Volunteers of the Company, which left Hingham Wednesday 
afternoon, April 17, 1861, for active duty, in response to the call 
of the President of the United States. 13 



98 



HINGHAM IN THE CIVIL WAR. 



REGULAR MEMBERS OF THE 


COMPANY. 


Rank. 


Name. 


Residence, 


Captain 


Luther Stephenson, jun. 


Hingham. 


Lieutenani 


: Charles Sprague, 


<( 


« 


Nathaniel French, jun., 


(t 


Sergeant 


Peter N. Sprague, 


« 


n 


Joshua Morse, 


(( 


Corporal 


Henry Stephenson, 


« 


11 


Lyman B. Whiton, 


(t 


Fifer 


Samuel Bronsdon, 


u 


Private 


George W. Bibby, 


<{ 


a 


Jacob G. Gushing, 


• 


(( 


Henry S. Ewer, 


« 


Cl 


Levi Kenerson, 


(( 


i< 


Josiah M. Lane, 


il 


(( 


George R. Reed, 


(( 


« 


Benjamin S. Souther, 


(( 


« 


James S. Sturtevant, 


(( 


« 


William S. Whiton, 


<< 


« 


Joseph N. Berry, 


Weymouth. 


<( 


Parker E. Lane, 


<( 


« 


Daniel W. Lincoln, 

VOLUNTEERS. 


(( 


Private 


George M. Adams, 


Hingham. 


<( 


Charles H. Bassett, 


(( 


<< 


Andrew J. Clarke, 


« 


« 


John Creswell, 


(( 


i( 


Fergus A. Easton, 


« 


(I 


John W. Eldredge, 


« 


(( 


George A. Grover, 


et 


« 


James M. Haskell, 


<< 


(( 


George E. Humphrey, 


(( 


•( 


John O. Jacob, 


(( 


(( 


Benjamin L. Jones, 


« 


<( 


George Miller, 


« 


i( 


William T. Nelson, 


u 



THE LINCOLN LIGHT INFANTRY. gg 

Rank. Name. Residence. 

Private Ebenezer F. Roberts, Hingham. 

John S. Souther, 

William J. Stockwell, 

" Alvan Tower, " 

" Isaac G. Waters. " 

George Wolfe, 

" Elijah Prouty, Weymouth. 

" Theodore Raymond, " 

Alfred W. Stoddard, Marshfield. 

Boston was not reached till late in the afternoon. The 
Fourth Regiment, to which the company was attached, assem- 
bled at Faneuil Hall, but had marched to the State House, 
where the Lincoln Light Infantry joined it. Equipments, 
articles of clothing, and camp necessities, including provisions, 
had been distributed among the troops earlier in the day ; but, in 
the hurry and excitement of the hour, these articles of comfort 
were not fully shared by the Hingham soldiers. 

A brief address was made by Gov. Andrew ; after which, amid 
universal cheers, the Fourth and Sixth Regiments took up their 
line of rapid march together, the weather being cloudy and 
unpleasant, and the streets wet and muddy. 

The Fourth Regiment proceeded by the Old Colony, and the 
Sixth by the Worcester Road. The Fourth Regiment left the 
city some ten minutes prior to the departure of the Sixth, and 
was in reality the first body of troops which left Massachusetts 
for the seat of war, although they did not reach their destination 
as soon as some others. 

At Fall River the regiment embarked on board the steamer, 
" State of Maine," — a vessel which at the time was considered 
by the officers and troops generally to be unsafe or unseaworthy. 
She had been laid up for some time, and had nothing whatever 
on board, except what the soldiers had taken with them. The 
machinery was not in good order, the vessel was poorly bal- 
lasted, and they were eighteen hours in reaching New York City ; 
being all that night and the next day on board, with a large pro- 
portion of the rations provided, totally unfitted for use by 



100 HINGHAM IN THE CIVIL WAR. 

reason of the odor communicated from the rubber sacks in 
which they had been conveyed. 

At New York the agent promised, and brought about, a 
better state of things. The steamer was put in better order, 
provisions were taken on board, and she left the city in a more 
seawortliy condition. The passage to Fortress Monroe — the 
point to which at last they proved to be destined — was more 
comfortable, and the place was reached in safety on the morning 
of Saturday, the 20th of April. 

At the time of the departure of the company, such was the 
urgency of the call from the State authorities, that no opportunity 
was allowed to enlist the men required to make up its full 
quota. Immediate action was had to supply the deficiency; and 
thirty-seven new recruits were soon enrolled, drilled, and uni- 
formed. 

On Saturday morning, May 18, 1861, these soldiers met at 
the armory, at Hingham Centre ; and after a brief drill, a prayer 
in their behalf for the protection and blessing of Heaven by Rev. 
E. Porter Dyer, and the exchange of farewells with their friends, 
took up their line of march to the music of fife and drum for the 
landing of the steamer " Nantasket." Under the temporary 
command of Capt. John Stephenson, assisted by Lieut. William 
Fearing, they proceeded down Main Street, by way of Broad 
Bridge, to the boat, where the wharf was found crowded with 
interested citizens, including' friends and connections. Parting 
salutations were brief and hurried, and three times three cheers 
were given "betwixt ship and shore" as the steamer moved 
from the wharf with her burden of patriotic soldiers. 

The following is a list of the volunteers who left Hingham 
May 18, 1 86 1, to join Company I of the Fourth Regiment, then 
stationed at Fortress Monroe. 



Names. 


Residen'CE. 


Henry F. Binney, 


Hingham, 


James B. Bryant, 


(1 


John W. Burr, 


i( 


Thomas A. Carver, 


(1 


Silas H. Cobb, 


»i 



THE LINCOLN LIGHT INFANTRY. 



lOI 



Names. 


Residence. 


Charles Corbett, 


Hinghara. 


Jerry J. Corcoran, 


i( 


Isaac M. Dow, 


« 


Levi H. Dow, 


If 


George Dunbar, 


<i 


George W. Fearing, 


(i 


Henry C. French, 


a 


Albert S. Haynes, 


<< 


Edwin Hersey, 


(( 


William H. Jacob, 


(< 


William H. Jones, 


(< 


Alfred A. Lincoln, 


« 


Daniel S. Lincoln, 


« 


William H. Marston, 


<( 


Jacob Ourish, 


<( 


Albert L. Peirce, 


<< 


Charles H. F. Stodder, 


(< 


Demerick Stodder, 


<< 


William Taylor, 


u 


Charles H. Damon, 


West Scituate. 


George C. D welly, 


Hanover. 


Hosea Dwelly, 


(( 


Francis W. Everson, 


Weymouth. 


Charles A. Gardner, 


West Scituate. 


Henry C. Gardner, 


« « 


John D. Gardner, 


(( « 


Herbert Graves, 


u ' u 


William B. Harlow, 


Hanover. 


E. A. Jacob, 


West Scituate, 


John H. Prouty, 


<( <( 


William Prouty, jun.. 


(( (( 


Alpheus Thomas, 


South 



On their arrival in Boston, they proceeded at once to the 
State House, where, after being equipped and supplied with 
clothing and other articles needed in the experience of the life 
of a soldier, they were addressed by Gov. Andrew, in words 



102 HINGHAM IN THE CIVIL WAR. 

replete with hope and encouragement, exhorting them as true 
patriots to go forth for the cause of their country in this her 
hour of trial and danger. Dining at the Ouincy House, they 
embarked at half-past four o'clock on board the steamer " Cam- 
bridge," which was to convey them to their port of destination. 
Here, as at Hingham, a large company of relatives and friends 
had assembled to take their leave ; and many were the adieus and 
heartfelt farewells exchanged between those about to depart 
and those who were to be left behind. The voyage proved a 
stormy one, and the steamer was somewhat driven from her 
course ; but the harbor was finally reached without accident, and 
at noon of the 22d of May all were safely landed at Fortress 
Monroe, the roll of the Lincoln Light Lifantry being thus 
increased to seventy-nine men. 

While at Fortress Monroe, the troops-were actively engaged 
in mounting guns, and in the general work of putting the situ- 
ation in thorough repair, as well for its defence as for offensive 
operations, should such become necessary. 

On the 27th of May, after a stay of five weeks, the Fourth 
Regiment, including the Lincoln Light Infantry, by order of 
Gen. Butler, left Fortress Monroe for Newport News, which was 
reached the next day. May 28. A regiment from Vermont, and 
a regiment, mostly Germans, from Pennsylvania, accompanied 
them. 

Looking over the new position, it was soon apparent, that 
whatever the troops might require, — whether of food, shelter, or 
protection from the enemy, to which they were fully exposed, — 
they were expected in some way to provide for themselves. As 
may be supposed, after the labor expended at Fortress Monroe, 
and just as the means of comfort and security had been well 
provided, the change created no little dissatisfaction. There 
was, however, no alternative. The neighboring farms were 
called in requisition for the needed supplies, intrenchments were 
begun, and in a few days they were prepared for the enemy. 

The Point, commanding as it did the mouth of James River, 
was considered an important one; and early in June, from various 
sources, the number of available troops had been increased to 
more than four thousand men. 



THE LINCOLN LIGHT INFANTRY. 



103 



On the 9th of June the company made an expedition into the 
enemy's country, to ascertain, if possible, the situation and 
strength of the forces gathered in the vicinity. The heat was 
great, the journey long and wearisome; and the company returned 
to camp at night thoroughly exhausted and unfit for duty. 

On Sunday, June 11, occurred the disaster at Big Bethel, the 
particulars of which need not here be given. In making up 
the quota of troops required for the service, it was found, that, 
of the Lincoln Light Infantry, but forty men were in condition 
to join the expedition ; all being more or less enfeebled, and still 
suffering from the results of the heat and fatigues experienced 
on the previous Thursday. Thus unfitted to take part in the 
enterprise, their place was supplied by Company F, Capt. 
Sheppard ; all, however, being desirous to join the party. 

Through the early part of the month of June the weather was 
oppressively warm, and the health of the company was some- 
what impaired. Indeed, the general healthful condition of the 
men was scarcely regained up to its close ; and the order for 
removal to Hampton was received with hearty satisfaction. 
This change was made on Tuesday, July 2. Better shelter, better 
accommodations, soon told on the men in a marked improve- 
ment of health and spirits. Their stay at this locality was neces- 
sarily brief, as the term of enlistment was rapidly drawing to its 
close. For two weeks, quartered in private residences left ten- 
antless by rebel citizens, or in the churches of the town, our 
friends of the Lincoln Light Infantry found immunity from 
severe labor, exposure, or fear of attack from the enemy. 

The term of enlistment having expired, the Fourth Regiment, 
including the Lincoln Light infantry, returned to Fortress Mon- 
roe, where it embarked on board the steamer " S. R. Spaulding," 
and, after a pleasant passage, reached Boston, Friday, July 19. 
The landing was made at Long Island, and they were there 
ordered into camp ; the general health of the troops, notwith- 
standing the change of climate and the severity of the service 
through which they had passed, being good. 

After being mustered out, the regiment moved up to the 
city, where a hearty reception was given it by the author- 
ities. A dress-parade took place on the Common ; the apart- 



104 



H INGHAM IN 7 HE CIVIL WAR. 



ments of the " Tigers " were opened for the accommodation of the 
Lincohi Light Infantry; Mr. E. Waters Burr generously provided 
entertainment at the Parker House ; and the night was passed in 
comfortable quarters. 

THE RECEPTION AT HINGHAM. 

On the following morning, Wednesday, July 23, the Lincoln 
• Light Infantry, accompanied by the Boston Brigade Band and a 
detachment of the Second Battalion of Infantry in new Zouav^e 
uniform, under Capt. John C' Whiton, took passage on board the 
steamer "Nantasket " for HingJiam. As they came to the land- 
ing, they were greeted by a multitude of citizens, — men, women, 
and children, from every section of the town, — anxious to express 
their respect and gratitude for the patriotic spirit displayed on 
the part of their fellow-townsmen, and to give them a hearty 
welcome home. 

A procession was formed on the wharf, consisting of the 
Home Guards, "Extinguisher," "Torrent," and "Niagara" fire- 
companies, a numerous cavalcade, and a large company of citi- 
zens. Amid the ringing of the church-bells, the band played 
" Home Again," and led the procession, under command of Capt. 
John C. Whiton, from the landing to Water Street, where, in 
front of the residence of Capt. Luther Stephenson, Major 
Cobb's Light Battery, numbering one hundred and fifty horses 
and six guns, was in waiting to head the escort. The entire 
body then passed down Main Street to Broad Bridge, and 
halted in front of Lincoln's- Building, where three months 
before they gave the parting hand, and left for the seat of war. 
Here they were surrounded and welcomed by a large concourse 
of citizens ; and, after a service of thanksgiving and benediction 
by Rev. Calvin Lincoln, they were addressed by Henry Edson 
Hersey Esq., in the public behalf, as follows : — 

" With emotions of thankfulness and joy too deep to find full expres- 
sion in words, your fellow-citizens and friends welcome you to your homes. 
As champions of the great cause of constitutional liberty, as pioneers of 
the grand army of loyal Americans, you left at a moment's warning your 
peaceful pursuits, and the dear objects of your love, to stand with your com- 



THE LINCOLN LIGHl INFANTRY 



105 



patriots in arms, for the defence of the national capital, for the preserva- 
tion of the nation's life ; and with God's blessing the nation's life shall be 
preserved. Reverses, however unexpected and disastrous, shall not dis- 
hearten us. The justice of our cause remains ; ay, and its ultimate vindi- 
cation is as sure as the final triumph of God's truth ; and they who lay 
down their life in its defence are martyrs in the holiest cause for which, in 
our time, it is permitted men to die. 

" Soldiers, from the time of your departure from this spot until this 
moment, we have followed your fortunes and watched your every move- 
ment with an interest such as Hingham has never before felt in any com- 
pany of her sons. Knowing that your position, although a glorious one, 
had its inevitable hardships and its grave perils, we have done what we 
could to sustain and encourage you. The care of your families we have 
regarded as a sacred trust, which we could not too conscientiously fulfil. 
By municipal provisions, and by private offerings, we have striven to relieve 
you in some measure from anxiety about your domestic interests, and to 
show that we appreciate the magnitude of the debt which we owe to you as 
the defenders of civil rights against the most infamous band of conspira- 
tors that ever bade defiance to the wrath of men and the avenging justice 
of Heaven. 

" When you went out from among us, we felt that to you was committed 
the honor of our town. Knowing that the life of the camp and the garrison 
has never been regarded as favorable to the preservation of good morals, 
and how strong is the temptation to those who take up arms for lawful ends 
to use their power sometimes unworthily, we could not but feel some solici- 
tude, lest even the safeguards of a New England education might at times 
prove insufficient. But you are returned to us with your honor as you 
went. And we assure you, that, glad as we have been to hear of your gene- 
ral good health, and of your faithful performance of all military duty, 
what has most rejoiced our hearts has been the reports which have reached 
us from time to time, that every man among you has been equal to the best 
in steadiness and honesty; that, in putting on the armor of soldiers, )-ou 
have laid off none of the obligations which rested on you as men ; that 
even the 'sacred soil of Virginia' has not been polluted by your presence, 
and that some of her chivalric sons may possibly have learned from you 
how to be gentlemen. 

"Welcome, then, and again welcome, citizen soldiers, sons of Massa- 
chusetts, defenders of the Republic ! Welcome to these family scenes, 
14 



I06 HINGHAM IN THE CIVIL WAR. 

where war's devastation has not come ! Here no fortress walls environ 
you, but you are girt about with proud and grateful hearts. Not here, as in 
the Old Dominion, are the loyal sons of America greeted by murderous 
vollies from hostile batteries : here you need deploy no skirmishers as you 
advance, for not even the sight of a retreating rebel shall remind you that 
treason is anj'where abroad. The flags that wave above you have not one 
stripe erased or polluted, not a single star obscured, and shall not have 
forever. 

" We congratulate you that no sad or discordant note mingles with these 
greetings. No traitor's bullet, nor accident, nor disease, has deprived you 
of a single life. No parent nor wife nor child nor brother nor sister shall 
blush that any man of you has tarnished his honor, or came tardy off in 
duty. In the hour of our imminent peril, your country summoned you to 
her defence, and with alacrity you responded to the call. To the latest 
hour of your lives shall memory delight to dwell on this patriotic scene ; 
and the priceless blessings of the American Union shall have new value in 
your eyes, who thought not the sacrifice of your lives too great, if thereby 
that Union might be preserved. 

To these remarks, Capt. Stephenson responded as follows : — 

"My Friends and Neighbors;' — I hardly know what to say, to prop- 
erly express my thanks in behalf of my command, for this warm and 
enthusiastic reception, the kind and earnest greeting you have extended to 
us to-day. You have added one more obligation to the many that are due 
our friends for the constant succession of favors, for the numberless expres- 
sions of friendship and sympathy we hav^e received during our absence ; 
and I assure you that the knowledge that we were watched over and cared 
for by our friends at home has lightened many a load, and revived many a 
drooping spirit, worn out almost with labor and disease. 

" Friends, we bring to you no laurels won on the battle-field ; for although 
always placed in the post of danger, although there seems always to be 
assigned to Massachusetts men to form the advance guard in every expedi- 
tion of danger and of labor, we have passed through unharmed : and, when 
I look around on this happy gathering, I thank God that it is so ! I thank 
God that no wife will look in vain for the form of one she loves ; no father 
or mother will search in vain for their son ; that no child has been bereft of 
the care and love of a father ; but that they are all here (many of us worn 



THE LINCOLN LIGHT INFANTRY. 107 

and weary I know) that every fireside shall be made glad by the return of 
husband, parent, and son, who had been so tremblingly watched, so anxiously 
waited for ! 

" And yet, although we have not been called upon to face the cannon's 
mouth, I know from their bearing when danger threatened, and the conflict 
seemed inevitable, that they would have met the enemy without flinching, 
and have nobly sustained the honor of old Massachusetts, and the good 
name of our dear town. 

" No one can estimate the amount of blood and of treasure that has been 
saved by the prompt action of our Massachusetts militia. In all proba- 
bility, had we arrived at Fortress Monroe two days later, that important 
post would have been lost. The key of Virginia, more important at this 
crisis, perhaps, than even the capital itself, would have been in the pos- 
session of traitors and rebels, and a million of treasure, and thousands of 
precious lives, would have been sacrificed to regain what was saved by the 
prompt action of eight hundred men, who left their homes, their families, 
and their business, to answer the call of their country, to support the gov- 
ernment, and to enforce the laws. 

" Therefore, if we have not in the field of battle been called upon to meet 
the foe hand to hand, we feel that we have acted an important part in the 
great drama ; and, for myself, I am glad it has fallen to my lot to join in 
this second great struggle for our independence, believing that my children, 
and my children's children, will remember it with gratitude when I shall 
have passed away. 

" My friends, allow me once more to thank you for your kindness towards 
us, and your presence here. These green fields and pleasant homes of our 
dear town, the church spires, the forms of these reverenced men whose 
voices we have missed so much at each returning sabbath, this happy 
re-union with our parents, wives, children, and friends, almost make us 
forget our toils and trials, and more than repay us for what we have done 
for the great cause in which we have been engaged. 

At the close of these exercises the procession reformed, and 
marched through North, West, South, and Main Street, to the 
Town Hall, the Hingham soldiers leaving their guns at the 
armory on the way. Two guns from Major Cobb's Battery, 
stationed on land of Capt. James Stephenson, fired salutes as the 
procession passed up Pear-tree Hill. 



I08 HINGHAM IN THE CIVIL WAR. 

At the Town Hall, an excellent collation had been prepared by 
a comn;ittee of ladies and gentlemen chosen for the purpose. 
The tables were spread in superabundance with almost every 
procurable luxury, and were beautifully adorned with the choicest 
flowers of the season. 

The Light Battery left their guns, carriages, and horses on the 
grounds of the Agricultural Society, and repaired to the Town 
Hall. 

The engine companies "Extinguisher" and "Torrent" ac- 
cepted the invitation of the " Niagara " company at Hingham 
Centre to a collation in their hall. 

At five o'clock, p.m., the Light Battery returned to camp at 
Ouincy, and the Second Battalion of Infantry, with the band, 
left at 4.30, P.M., by steamer "Nantasket" for Boston. 

The soldiers embraced the earliest opportunity afforded to 
return to their homes, where wife, children, parent, and friends 
were anxiously waiting to greet and welcome them. 

Throughout the day flags were numerously displayed from 
the public buildings and from private residences in every part of 
the town ; and the streets were thronged with carriages, and 
with men, women, and children. 

The day and the occasion were truly eventful. The prompt 
and patriotic response of the Town of Hingham to the call of the 
country is a source of congratulation, and will form one of the 
brightest pages in its history. That the early re-enforcement of 
the garrison at Fortress Monroe by loyal troops was the means 
of retaining this important station on the side, and in support, of 
the Federal Government, there can scarcely be a doubt ; and the 
expedition must be set down as followed by the best results, and 
crowned with the most desirable success. As the attending 
circumstances are reviewed, there is little, from first to last, that 
could be omitted or changed ; and the whole will reflect lasting 
honor on every man who took part in the enterprise. 

It would be ingratitude not to acknowledge the divine good- 
ness, that, sparing al], gathered anew the ranks at home unbroken 
by death from disease, or by violence from the hand of man on 
the field of battle. 



THE LINCOLN LIGHT INFANTRY. 



COMMITTEE AND ORDER OF PROCESSION, 



109 



Committee of Arrangement. — The' Committee of Arrange- 
ments for the reception were Messrs John Todd, John Stephen- 
son, Joseph Jacob, WilHam Fearing, 2d, David Cain, E. Waters 
Burr, Ehjah L. Whiton, Daniel Bassett, David Leavitt, Demerick 
Marble, Abner L. Leavitt, John K. Corthell, John Cushing, 
David Cushing, jun., E. B. Whitcomb, Charles W, Seymour, 
Henry E. Hersey, Joseph B. Thaxter, jun., Thomas F. Whiton, 
and Albert Whiting. 

ORDER OF PROCESSION. 

Aids to the Chief Marshal. 

Maj. Cobb's Full Battery. 

Aid. Chief Marshal. Aid. 

Past and Honorary Members of the Lincoln Light Infantry, as a military 

escort under command of Lieut. William Fearing, 2d. 

Committee of arrangements. 

Invited guests. 

Brigade Band. 

Lincoln Light Infantry. 

Firewards. 

The several engine companies in the order of their numbers. 

Citizens generally. 

Cavalcade. 

Marshals. — Albert Whiting, Seth C. Dunbar, Joseph Jacob, 
jun., Ezra Wilder, George Cushing, 2d, Solomon Lincoln, jun., 
Henry C. Harding, Charles Spring, William C. Lincoln, George 
Lincoln, jun., John D. Gates, Robert W. Lincoln, Charles W. 
Cushing, Erastus Whiton, Hiram Gardner, Ezra T. C. Stephen- 
son, Joseph H. French, George H. French, Albert Thayer, Joseph 
A. Newhall, Benjamin Thomas, and Enos Loring. 

Aids. — Daniel Bassett, David Cushing, jun., John K. Cor- 
thell, Edwin Wilder, 2d, and Thomas Stephenson. 

HISTORY. 

The Lincoln Light Lrfantry was organized Oct. 19, 1854. 
The first preliminary meeting was held Oct 14; and on the 28th 
of the month, the company adopted the title of " Lincoln," in 
honor of Benjamin Lincoln, a major-general in the army of the 
Revolution, and a native of Hingham. 



no . HINGHAM IN THE CIVIL WAR. 

On the 20th of June, 1855, pursuant to a warrant from his 
Excellency, Henry J. Gardner, governor of the State and com- 
mander-in-chief, the members met for the election of officers ; 
and Hawkes Fearing, jun., was chosen captain. 

The first parade was made July 4, 1855. ^^^g- iS, i860, 
Joseph T. Sprague was elected captain, vice Hawkes Fearing, 
jun., promoted lieutenant-colonel. Fourth Regiment, M. V. M. 

April 17, 1 86 1, the company with forty-two men, in command 
of Lieut. Luther Stephenson, >un., left Hingham for three 
months' active service at Fortress Monroe and vicinity. 

April 19, 1 861, Lieut. Stephenson was chosen captain, vice 
CajDt. Joseph T. Sprague. 

April 23, 1 861, the company was mustered into the service of 
the United States for three months, to date from April 16, 1861. 

May 18, 1861, thirty-seven additional volunteers left Hingham 
to join the company, and the number was increased to seventy- 
nine men. 

Mustered out of service July 22, and returned to Hingham 
July 24, 1 86 1. 

Feb. 17, 1862, Joshua Morse was elected captain, vice Luther 
Stephenson, jun., honorably discharged. 

May 26, 1862, the company, then numbering forty-two men, 
was ordered to report at once on the Common at Boston for 
active service, on account of the rumored defeat of Gen. Banks 
and the Union army. 

May 28," 1862, returned to Hingham, the services of the com- 
pany not being required. 

June 23, 1862, Peter N. Sprague was elected captain, vice 
Capt. Joshua Morse resigned ; and on the 29th of the Septem- 
ber following, the company was disbanded, and the officers hon- 
orably discharged. 




CHAPTER VI. 



ONE HUNDRED DAYS MEN. 

Expiration of Term of Enlistment of First Three-j'ear's Men — Danger of the National 
Capital — Furloughs granted for Re-Enlistment — Call for Eighty-five Thousand One Hun- 
dred Days' Men — Quota of Massachusetts — Number furnished by Massachusetts — 
Enlistments from Hingham — Fifth Regiment — Forty-Second Regiment — Sixtieth 
Regiment — List of One Hundred Days' Men. 



THE term of enlistment of those who first entered the ser- 
vice for three years expired in the summer of 1864. The 
situation at the time was critical : the National Capital was 
believed to be in danger from an advance of the enemy, and the 
reduction of the numerical force of the army a matter of serious 
importance. To provide against this reduction, a furlough was 
offered by the government as an inducement for re-enlistment ; 
and this Was accepted by a large number of the discharged 
troops, who at once left for home to enjoy the vacation, to 
which in consideration of a long, wearisome, and perilous experi- 
ence, they were so justly entitled. 

A call was then issued for 85,000 troops to serve 'for one hun- 
dred days ; and a requisition was made on the State of Massa- 
chusetts for five regiments of this class, to take the place of 
those temporarily absent, and also, by furnishing men for garri- 
son duty, to strengthen the effective force then in the field. It 
was understood that these soldiers were not to be reckoned on 
the quota of the State, but were to be exempted from liability 
to the draft then pending, which involved a service of three 
years. 

The number of troops actually supplied by Massachusetts 
under this requisition was 5,461. The number who enlisted 
from Hingham appears to have been limited. The records 
received include the following : — 



112 HINGHAM IN THE CIVIL WAR. 



FIFTH REGIMENT. 

This was among the first miHtary organizations that left 
Massachusetts for the seat of war, in April, 1861, and took part 
in the first battle of Bull Run. It afterwards, in the autumn of 
1862, volunteered for nine months, and was assigned to the 
Department of North Carolina. July 28, 1864, it was again 
mustered into service, this time for the period of one hundred 
days. Connected with the regiment during this last term were 
the following persons from Hingham, viz. : — 

PRIVATES. 

ROBERT CUSHING. 

Born in Hingham. 

Enlisted at Boston ; mustered at Readville, in Co. F, July 
16, 1864; mustered out Nov. 16, 1864, by reason of expira- 
tion of term of enlistment. 

Robert Cushing died in Hingham Sept. 26, 1869, of consump- 
tion, aged 27 years, 8 months. 

REVERE LINCOLN. 

Born in Hingham, Dec. 2, 1846. 

Enlisted at Readville, Mass., July 12, 1864; mustered in Co. 
F, July 28 ; served at Fort McHenry, Baltimore, Md., on 
garrison duty, and in guarding prisoners, and new recruits 
who were being sent to their regiments. Mustered out at 
Readville, Nov. 16, 1864, by reason of expiration of service. 



ONE HUNDRED DAYS' MEN. 



FORTY-SECOND REGIMENT. 



113 



This regiment originally left Boston in November, 1862, to 
serve for the period of nine months ; and, proceeding to New- 
York, was assigned to the Department of the Gulf. After 
returning to Massachusetts, it was re-organized in 1864, to do 
guard-duty in or near Alexandria, Va., for the term of one hun- 
dred days. In this regiment were, — 

LIEUTENANTS, 

JOSEPH M. THOMAS. 

Born in Hanson, Aug 24^ 1S41. 

Enlisted at Boston. Mustered in July 14, 1864, as second lieu- 
tenant of Co. A, for one hundred days. Mustered out Nov. 
II, 1864, by reason of expiration of term of enlistment. 
Lie.ut. Thomas was also in the service for a period of nine 
months, as will be seen by referring to the proper chapter. 

FERGUS ANZLE EASTON. 

Born in Langham, Scotland, Sept. 24, 1842. 

First, A volunteer in the Lincoln Light Infantry, and left Hing- 
ham with this company, April 17, for Fortress Monroe, serv- 
ing three months. 
Second, Enlisted Aug. i, 1861, as orderly sergeant in the Sixth 
Regiment N.Y. Vol. Cavalry. Promoted second lieutenant, 
June 27, 1862, and commissioned first lieutenant March 22, 
1863. Resigned at Warrenton, Va., July 29, 1863, on account 
of sickness. 
TJiird, Re-enlisted as sergeant in Co. E, of the Forty-second 
Regiment, M. V. I., one hundred days, and was mustered in 
July 22, 1864. Mustered out Nov. 11, 1864. 
Whole term of service two and a half years. 

While connected with the Sixth New York Regiment, Lieut. 
Easton participated in all the variations of cavalry service. 
Fully at the front, he was in the engagements at South Moun- 
tain, Antietam, Wheatland, Kelly's Ford, Spottsylvania, Chancel- 
lorsville, Beverly Ford, Gettysburg, Boonsboro', Funkstown, 



I 14 HINGHAM IN THE CIVIL WAR. 

Williamsport, and Falling Waters, besides others of less impor- 
tance. He is reported as being an accomplished and popular 
officer. His resignation was tendered on account of ill health. 
Lieut. F. A. Easton formerly resided at South Hingham. 

CORPORAL 

GEORGE DUNBAR. 

Born in Hingham, Nov. 14, 1838. 

Enlisted at Readville, Mass., and was mustered July 20, 1864, as 
corporal in Co. D. 

At the commencement of this service, Mr. Dunbar was 
detailed by special order No. 38, of Gen. Slough, to Head- 
quarters Provost Marshal Defences South of the Potomac, under 
Col. Henry Hunt Wells of the Twenty-sixth Michigan Infantry, 
to the duty of receiving statements from prisoners, refugees, 
deserters, and also of preferring charges, forwarding reports from 
scouts, &c., until the Forty-second returned to Massachusetts. 

Nov. II, 1864, he was discharged at Readville by reason of 
expiration of term of enlistment. 

Mr. Dunbar was also with the Lincoln Light Infantry at Fort- 
ress Monroe; and for a short time in 1862 was under orders, 
having been commissioned by Gov. Andrew, second lieutenant 
of Co. I, Fourth Regiment, M. V. He was honorably discharged 
Sept. 10, 1862, by reason of the disbandment of the company. 

PRIVATE 

JOHN HENRY STODDER. 

Born in Hingham, Nov. 14, 1S45. 

Enlisted July 9, 1864, at Readville, Mass., as private in Co. D, 
and was mustered in July 11, 1864. 

While in service he was engaged in provost-duty at Alexan- 
dria, Va., and was also employed in picket-duty in Maryland. 
Four weeks were spent at Slough Barracks Hospital, Alexandria, 
Va., where he was confined with typhoid fever. 

After the expiration of his term of enlistment, he was mustered 
out at Readville, Nov. 11, 1864, having been in service four 
months. 



ONE HUNDRED DAYS' MEN. 115 

SIXTIETH REGIMENT. 

This was a new military organization, although many of its 
officers and privates had previously seen service. It was com- 
manded by Col. Ansel D. Wass, an experienced officer of Boston, 
and stationed at or near Indianapolis, Ind., to perform guard- 
duty. There was but one enlistment from Hingham in this 
regiment, viz. : — 

PRIVATE 

ANDREW WALLACE GARDNER. 

Born in Hingham, Dec. i, 1S44. 

Enlisted at Ouincy. Mustered in Co. B, on Hingham quota, 
July, 16, 1864. Mustered out at Boston, Nov. 30, 1864. (See 
chapter for one year's service.) 

LIST OF ONE HUNDRED DAYS' MEN. 

Robert Cushing. Revere Lincoln. 

George Dunbar. John H. Stodder. 

Fergus A. Easton. Joseph M. Thomas. 
Andrew W. Gardner. 




CHAPTER VII. 



NINE MONTHS MEN. 

Call for Three Hundred Thousand Men to serve for Nine Months — Time allowed for recruit- 
ing — Quota of Hinjham — Recruits from Plymouth, Middleboro'. and Ouincy — Fourth 
Regiment — Fifth Regiment — Sixth Regiment — Forty-Third Regiment — Forty-Fourth 
Regiment — Forty-Fifth Regiment — Fiftieth Regiment — Eleventh Light Battery — 
List of Nine Months' Men. 



ON the 4th of August, 1862, three hundred thousand addi- 
tional men were called for by the government, to serve for 
a term of nine months, eleven days being allowed for recruit- 
ing the number required. Failing to answer the requisition, a 
draft was ordered to take place on the 15 th, to make up the defi- 
ciency. 

Of the number thus called for, nineteen thousand and eighty 
were to be furnished by the State of Massachusetts ; the quota 
for the town of Hingham being eighty-three. 

Under this class, regiments were formed as .follows : viz., 
Third, Fourth, Fifth, Sixth, Eighth, Forty-second to the Fifty- 
third inclusive, and the Eleventh Battery. 

Of natives or residents of Hingham known to have enlisted 
under this call, nearly all were included in the Forty-third, 
Forty-fourth, and Forty-fifth Regiments. It should, however, be 
stated in this connection, that a number of men were borrowed 
from the towns of Plymouth, Middleboro', and Quincy, to fill up 
the quota ; and the names of such occur among the papers of the 
Town. Many of these men were soon after returned, and the 
bounty money advanced subsequently refunded. 



NINE MONTHS' MEN. ny 



FOURTH REGIMENT. 

The Fourth Regiment was first mustered into service in April, 
1 86 1, for three months, and ordered to Fortress Monroe, Va. It 
was commanded by Col. Abner B. Packard of Ouincy, and 
included among its companies the Lincoln Light Infantry (Co. I) 
of Hingham. When the call was made, in 1862, for 19,080 men 
for nine months, the Fourth again volunteered, and was sent to 
Camp " Joe Hooker " to receive recruits. It was placed under 
the command of Col. Henry Walker, and ordered to join the 
forces under Maj.-Gen. Banks in the Department of the Gulf. 
So far as known, there were but two Hingham persons in the 
regiment, viz. : — 

CORPORAL 

TILSON FULLER. 
A resident of Hindiam. 



&' 



Enlisted at Taunton Mass., mustered in Co. K, Sept. 15, 1862, 
at Camp "Joe Hooker," Lakeville, Mass. ; was in the battles of 
Vermillionville and Port Hudson, La., also detailed as clerk 
to Adj. Crocker of third brigade, commanded by Gen. 
Ingraham. Mustered out at Lakeville, Aug. 28, 1863. 

Mr. Fuller gives the following additional particulars : — 
" The Fourth Massachusetts Regiment sailed from New York 
in the ship ' George Peabody.' After a long passage, just avoid- 
ing the ' Alabama,' and narrowly escaping being shipwrecked on 
the rocks off the Florida coast, her passengers were safely landed 
at Carrollton, La., having been on ship-board forty-seven days. 
Camping here some weeks, we were ordered to Baton Rouge. 
We then marched to the rear of Port Hudson, the navy co- 
operating on the river, and making Un appearance of attacking. 
In the mean time Admiral Farragut succeeded in running several 
of his vessels past the fort, though losing the " Mississippi," 
which accidentally was run aground, and subsequently blown up. 



Il8 H INGHAM IN THE CIVIL WAR. 

Securing a lot of cotton, we returned to Baton Rouge ; then 
passing down the Mississippi River, crossed over opposite New 
Orleans to Algiers, and commenced our march to Alexandria. 
At Vermillionville we were opposed by the rebels ; and a sharp 
battle ensued, lasting two days, when they retreated. After 
recruiting ourselves at Alexandria, we returned by forced 
marches, crossed the Mississippi River to the other side of Port 
Hudson, and were there engaged in the siege until the garrison 
surrendered. In one of the charges on the garrison, Capt. Bart- 
lett and several of the company were killed, and a number 
wounded. 

After the surrender, we remained for several weeks performing 
garrison duty, and were then ordered home. 

PRIVATE 

CALEB BEAL MARSH. 

Born in Hingham, Jan. i, 1832. 

Enlisted at Canton, Mass; mustered in Co. A, Sept. 17, 1862, at 
Lakeville ; was in the first attack at Port Hudson, and at the 
battle of Bisland, La.; taken prisoner June 23, 1863, and 
sent to Brashear City, La. ; thence, July 4, to Donaldsonville, 
but never exchanged ; afterv^^ards with the regiment at Port 
Hudson ; embarked on steamboat " North America" for Cairo, 
and from thence by railroad to Boston. Mustered out at 
Lakeville, Aug. 28, 1863, having, in common with other mem- 
bers of the regiment, served upwards of eleven months. 



NINE MONTHS' MEN. i ig 



FIFTH REGIMENT. 

The Massachusetts "Fifth" was one of the regiments called 
into the United States service for three months at the com- 
mencement of the war. It bore an honorable part at the battle 
of Bull Run, July 17, 1861, and was especially commended for 
steadiness and bravery. 

When the call was made for nine months' men, Aug. 4, 1862, 
the regiment again entered the service, and was sent to New- 
bern, N.C. Its muster roll bears the name of — 

SERGEANT 

JAIRUS LINCOLN, Jun. 

Born in Hingham, May 27, 1831. 

Enlisted at Yarmouth, Mass. ; mustered at Camp Lander, in the 
town of Wenham, Sept. 16, 1862, as sergeant in Co. E. 

Mr. Lincoln was with the regiment at Newbern, performing 
guard and picket duty. He also took part in the various expedi- 
tions from that point ; participated in the engagements at Golds- 
boro' Bridge, Kinston, and near Washington, N.C. ; and was 
mustered out at Wenham, Mass., July 2, 1863, by reason of 
expiration of service. 



I20 HINGHAM IN THE CIVIL WAR. 



SIXTH REGIMENT. 

This was the " Old Sixth " Regiment which went through 
Baltimore, April 19, 1861, under Col. Jones. It was recruited 
again in 1862, under Col. Albert S. Follansbee, for nine months' 
service, and stationed in the Department of Virginia, being most 
of the time upon outpost duty. Its muster-roll includes the 
name of — 

PRIVATE 

GEORGE SMITH. 

A resident of Hingham since the war ; born in Brighton, Mass., Jan. 20, 1832. 

Enlisted for the Town of Newton. Enrolled in Co. F, Sept. 8, 

1862. Was wounded slightly in the head during one of the 
nine battles in which he participated. Mustered out June 3, 

1863, by reason of exoiration of service. 



NINE MONTHS' MEN. 12I 



FORTY-THIRD REGIMENT. 

The Forty-third "Tiger" Regiment, Col. Charles S. Holbrook, 
was recruited at Camp Meigs, Readville, in September and 
October, 1 862. On the 24th of the latter month, it embarkecl at 
Boston, to co-operate in the Department of North Carolina, and, 
on arrival at Newbern, encamped just without the limits of the 
city, on the banks of the Trent River. It joined the expedition 
to Goldsboro', and was engaged at Kinston on the 14th of 
December. On the i6th it was present in the battle at White- 
hall, and detailed the next day for an expedition to Spring Bank 
Bridge, which they burned, and succeeded in routing a body of 
the enemy stationed at this locality. Returning to Newbern, 
they here remained in camp until the 17th of January, 1863, 
when the march was made on Trenton. 

From the 21st of January to the 13th of March, no further 
movements were made, and the regiment continued in camp. 
On the 14th it marched to Rocky Run for the relief o.f the 
Twenty-fifth Massachusetts Regiment, and on the 15th advanced 
to the junction of the Pollockville and Trent Roads. Not meet- 
ing the enemy, it again entered camp at Newbern, and continued 
at this station till April 7, when it joined the expedition for the 
relief of Little Washington. 

On the 9th it was engaged at Blount's Creek, and after a 
short advance on the enemy from the artillery, which the regi- 
ment supported, fell back, and by a very severe march reached 
camp the next afternoon. April 17 it again took steamer, and 
embarked for Little Washington, where it was engaged in garri- 
son and picket duty till the 24th, when camp was broken, and 
they proceeded to Newbern. Engaged in the construction of 
roads, fortifications, &c., they remained at this locality till the 
24th of the following June, when all embarked for Fortress 
Monroe ; soon after, however, leaving for White House, but 
shortly returning again to Fortress Monroe. 

On the 2d of July orders were received to proceed to Balti- 
more, which they reached at noon of the next day, and on the 
morning of the 4th went into quarters at Camp Bradford, just 
without the city. 



122 HINGHAM IN THE CIVIL WAR. 

It was here that some dissatisfaction arose on account of the 
expiration of the term of enlistment ; and an order was thereupon 
issued, leaving it optional with the men " to go to the front, or 
to return home." Two hundred and three, officers and men, 
including all those from Hingharh, voted " to go to the front." 

Proceeding to Sandy Hook under Lieut.-Col. John C. Whiton, 
the regiment continued to perform provost duty until July i8, 
when, after being highly complimented for the patriotic spirit 
displayed in the faithful manner in which the duties required 
had been performed, it was ordered to Boston to be mustered 
out of service. 

Leaving Sandy Hook July i8, it reached Boston July 21, 
and was mustered out of the service of the United States July 
30, 1863. 

The following list includes such of the Forty-third as were 
natives or residents of Hingham. The record of their services 
has been sketched in the foregoing narrative of the general expe. 
rience of the regiment. 

COLONEL 

JOHN CHADWICK WHITON. 

Born in Hingham, Aug. 22, 1828. 

His general record will be found in connection with the his- 
tory of the Fifty-eighth Regiment, M. V. I., three years. 

SERGEANT 

DEXTER GROSE. 
Co. F. 

Two brothers of Sergt. Grose were also in the service. 



CORPORAL 

GEORGE WILLIAM FEARING. 

Born in Hingham, Aug. 16, 1837. 

Co. K. 



NINE MONTHS' MEN. 



123 



At the outbreak of the rebellion, Mr. Fearing entered the 
service as a volunteer in the Lincoln Light Infantry, and left 
Hingham on the i8th of May, 1861, to join this company, then 
stationed at Fortress Monroe. 

On the 8th of May, 1S62, .credited to the town of Dover, 
Mass., he re-enlisted as private for nine months in Co. K, of the 
Forty-third Regiment, and while in camp at Readville was pro 
moted corporal. 

On the march from Newbern to Goldsboro', N.C., in the 
month of December, 1862, he was accidentally disabled, and 
compelled to retire from active service ; but, being retained as 
commissary, he continued with the regiment until the expiration 
of his term of enlistment. 

In consideration of the permanent character of the injury sus- 
tained, a small pension has been allowed. 



PRIVATES. 

LORING HERSEY GUSHING. 

Born in Hingham, April 3, 1840. 

Co. K. 
ISAAC FRANCIS GOODWIN. 

Born in Lebanon, Me., May 4, 1836. 

Co. K. 
*HOLLIS HERSEY. 

Born in Hingham, May 3, 1833. 

Co. K. 
PETER LORING. 

Born in Hingham, Nov. 6, 1837. 

Co. K. 



124 



HINGHAM IN THE CIVIL WAR. 

DANIEL McKENNA. 

Since deceased. 

Co. K. 

SAMUEL GUSHING SOUTHER. 

Born in Hingham, July 8, 1824. 

Go. K. 



THOMAS SOUTHER. 

1 in Hing 

Go. K. 



Born in Hingham. 



CHARLES TOWER. 

Born in Hingham, May 10, 1844. 

Co. K. 
WILLIAM WATERS SPRAGUE. 

Born in Hingham, Nov. i, 1844. 

Co. A. 

The regiment also included the following, as belonging to the 
quota of the town : — 

ROBERT M. GUMMINGS. 

Braintree, 23 years of age. 

Co. B. 
FREDERICK W. COTTON. 

Town records say " Hingham ; " State records, " Boston," age 20. 

Co. K. 



NINE MONTHS' MEN. 125 



FORTY-FOURTH REGIMENT. 

« 

The Forty-fourth, or " New England Guard Regiment," Col. 
Francis L. Lee, was gathered at " Camp Meigs," Readville, 
Mass.; and a large proportion of the recruits were there mustered 
on the 1 2th of September, 1862. 

After a few weeks spent in preparatory service, the regiment 
left for the - " Department of North Carolina," embarking at 
Boston by steamer " Merrimack," and arriving at Newbern on 
the 26th of October, Four days after landing, it started on the 
Tarboro' expedition, and Sunday, Nov. 2, took part in the skirmish 
at Smitherick's Ford and Rawles' Mills. Returning to New- 
bern, it remained at this post till Dec. 1 1, when Cos. D and H 
shared in the advance towards Goldsboro'. On the 14th, these 
companies were engaged at Kinston ; on the i6th, at Whitehall 
Bridge; on the 17th, in reserve at the battle of Goldsboro' ; and 
on the 20th retired again to Newbern. 

No further operations were made until early in February ; 
when they left for Plymouth, N.C., for the purpose of seizing pro- 
visions and army supplies stored for the use of the enemy. 

This being accomplished, they returned to Newbern, and 
remained in camp until the middle of March, when, with others, 
they left for Washington, N.C., the siege of this place being laid 
on the 30th of the month. 

On the first of April, the bombardment commenced ; and this 
was continued, with short intermissions, until the 15th, when the 
enemy fell back, and the siege was raised. 

On the 17th, several companies, including D, under the pro- 
tection of gun-boat " Com. Hull," were detailed to land at Hill's 
Point, and destroy and build up such intrenchments as might be 
found necessary to guard against attacks from the land side. 
Having finished the work, they left once more for Newbern, and 
there relieving the Forty-fifth M. V, M., continued to perform 
provost duty till June 6, when they embarked for Boston, Mass. 
On their arrival, they entered camp at Readville, where they 
were regularly mustered out of service on the i8th of June, 1863, 
their term of enlistment having expired. 



126 HINGHAM IN THE CIVIL WAR. 

During the campaign, neither Co. D nor H suffered seriously 
from disease, nor sustained loss from the casualties of the field, 
thou";h the loss to the reofiment in killed and wounded was 
thirty-seven, and fifty-three died from disease, or were discharged 
for disability. 

On the 14th of July the regiment was again called out for the 
suppression of a draft-riot in the city of Boston, and dismissed 
after a service of one week. 

Included in this regiment, were eight residents or natives of 
Hingham, viz. : — 

PRIVATES. 

ALVIN BLANCHARD, Jun. 

Born in Hingham, March iS, 1S44. 

Co. D. 
Died of consumption, March 8, 1874. 

JAMES LEWIS HUNT, 2d. 

Born in Hingham, Jan. 20, 1844. 

Co. H. 

Also performed duty as Regimental and Company Clerk. 

WILLIAM JONES. 

Born in Hingham, June, 1838. 

Co. D. 
LEVI KENERSON. 

Born in Hingham, Feb. 21, 1838. 

Co. D. 

JOHN HENRY LITCHFIELD, Jun. 

Born in Cohasset, Jan. 28, 1S44. 

Co. D. 



NINE MONTHS' MEN. 

JOHN ALBERT REED. 

Born in Hingham, June 13, 1842. 

Co. D. 
EZRA T. C. STEPHENSON. 

Born in Hingham, Feb. 18, 1842. 

Co. D. 
WILLIAM LORING STEPHENSON. 

Born in Hingham, Dec. 22, 1838. 

Co. D. 

Died in Hingham, Oct. 27, 1875. 



127 



FORTY-FIFTH REGIMENT. 

The Forty-fifth " Cadet Regiment," Col. Charles R. Codman, 
was recruited in the autumn of 1862, and, in common with the 
Forty-third and Forty-fourth, was mustered at Camp Meigs, 
Readville, Mass. 

Assigned to the Department of North Carolina, the regiment 
embarked at Boston on board the steamer " Mississippi," Nov. 5, 
1862 ; arrived at Morehead City, N.C., on the 14th, and the same 
day proceeded to Newbern. Here it remained in camp until 
early in December, when Co. G, which included such of the 
natives or residents of Hingham as were in the regiment, 
was detached and sent to Fort Macon, to form a part of the 
garrison of that post. Towards the close of April, being 
relieved from duty at Fort Macon, they were ordered to Fort 
Spinola, near which the regiment was then stationed. There the 
company remained until June 24', when camp was broken, and 
they left for Morehead City, where they embarked for Boston, 
touching at Fortress Monroe on the passage home. Arriving 
on the 30th, they proceeded to Readville, and were there mus- 
tered out of service, July 8, 1863. Of those reckoned upon the 
quota of the town, the Forty-fifth included the following, viz. : — 



128 HINGHAM IN THE CIVIL WAR. 



PRIVATES. 



ROBERT BURNSIDE. 

Of Boston. 

Co. I. 

ERNST F. EICHBORN. 

Hingham, age 34. 

Co. G. 

EDWIN G. EVANS. 

Dorchester, age 31. 

Co. B. 

JACOB A. EWELL. 

Dorchester, age 44. 
Co. B. 

FRANCIS HERSEY. 

Born in Hingham, Jan. 20, 1835. 

Co. G. 
HENRY O. LITTLE. 

Born in Hingham, age 28. 

Co. G. 
WILLIAM LOWRY, Jun. 

Hingham, age 27. 

Co. G. 

JOSIAH LANE MARSH. 
Born in Hingham, March 17, 1830. 

Co. G. 



NINE MONTHS' MEN. 1 29 

JOHN R. MAYHEW. 

Bora in Hingham, age 21. 

Co. G. 
* DANIEL W. PENDERGAST. 

Roxbury, age 27. 

Co. G. 
JAMES SOUTHER. 

Bora in Hingham, Nov. 9, 1822. 

Co. G. 
ARTEMAS SPRAGUE. 

Born in Hingham, age 29. 

Co. G. 

EDWARD TRABBITTS. 

Boston, age 31. 

Co. G. 

HERBERT J. TULLEY. 

Roxbury, age 23. 

Co. G. 
DANIEL J. WALLS. 

Hingham, age 22. 

Co. G. 



130 HINGHAM IN THE CIVIL WAR. 



FIFTIETH REGIMENT. 

Recruited at Camp Stanton, in Boxford. The regiment left 
the State Nov. 19, 1862, for New York City ; and from thence 
was ordered to Long Island, where it went into quarters at Camp 
Banks. Early in December, by various vessels, the regiment 
embarked for New Orleans, and was there assigned to the com- 
mand of Gen. Dudley of the first division, third brigade, 
Nineteenth Army Corps. 

It took part in the expedition of Gen. Banks to Port Hudson, 
and participated in the strategic movement by which Admiral 
Farragut was enabled to pass the batteries at this locality. 
Continuing in the vicinity of Port Hudson, co-operating in the 
various means employed for the siege of the place, it was not 
only present in the assaults directly made to reduce the fort, but 
was much of the time engaged in supporting the batteries during 
the bombardment, until the final surrender on the 9th of July. 

It arrived in Boston Aug. 11, and was mustered out at Wen- 
ham, Aug. 24, 1863, 

The only enlistment from Hingham, so far as known, was 

PRIVATE 

CHARLES H. BROWN. 

Age 21. 

Enlisted Sept. 19, 1862 ; member of Co. E, and was mustered 
out Aug. 24, 1863. 



NINE MONTHS' MEN. 



131 



ELEVENTH LIGHT BATTERY. 

This was the only battery of nine months' men which Massa- 
chusetts had in the field. It was mustered into service Aug. 25, 
1862, attached to the Twenty-second Army Corps, and assigned 
to dut}" in and around Washington. The only person connected 
with the battery from Hingham was 

PRIVATE 

JOSEPH M. THOMAS. 

Born in Hanson, Aug. 4, 1841. 

Enlisted from Hingham, Aug. 7, 1862. Mustered in at Read- 
ville Aug. 25th, for the period of nine months; mustered out 
May 29, 1863, by reason of expiration of service. (See chapter 
for one hundred days' men.) 



LIST OF NINE MONTHS' MEN. 



Alvin Blanchard, jun., 
Charles H. Brown. 
Robert Burn side. 
Ernst F. Eichborn. 
Edwin G. Evans. 
Jacob A. Ewell. 
George W. Fearing. 
Tilson Fuller. 
Isaac F. Goodwin. 
Dexter Grose. 
Francis Hersey. 
Hollis Hersey. 
James L. Hunt, 2d. 
William Jones. 
Levi Kenerson. 
Jairus Lincoln, jun. 
John H. Litchfield, jun. 
Henry O. Little. 
Peter Loring. 
William Lowry. 
Caleb B. Marsh. 
Frederick W. Cotton. 



Robert M. Cummings. 
Loring H. Gushing. 
Josiah L. Marsh. 
John R. Mayhew. 
Daniel McKenna. 
Daniel W. Pendergast. 
John A. Reed. 
George Smith. 
James Souther. 
Samuel C. Souther. 
Thomas Souther. 
Artemas Sprague. 
William W. Sprague. 
Ezra T. C. Stephenson. 
William L. Stephenson. 

Joseph M. Thomas.' 

Charles Tower. 
Edward Trabbits. 
Herbert J. Tulley. 
Daniel Walls, jun. 
John C. Whiton. 



CHAPTER VIII. 



ONE-YEAR MEN. 



Enlistments from Hingham — Sixtj--First Regiment, M. V. I. — Sixty-Second Regiment — 
Fourth Regiment Heav}- Artillery, M. V. — INIiscellaneous Assignments. 

THE number of persons connected with Hingham who served 
for the period of one year was thirty-eight. Of these, 
thirty-five were enrolled by recruiting-ofificer Charles N. Marsh. 
The record of all, residents and non-residents, was alike credita- 
ble to themselves and the town they represented. 

A brief sketch of the history of the regiments, with the names 
of the Hingham men connected therewith, is here appended. 



SIXTY-FIRST REGIMENT. 

The "Sixty-first," recruited in the autumn of 1864 and 
winter of 1864-5, was under the command of Col. Charles 
F. Wolcott, and has a good record. After being employed in 
erecting fortifications to cover City Point, Va., and doing 
picket-guard duty on the left of the army, it was attached to 
Gen. Collis's brigade, then operating with the Ninth Army 
Corps. It conducted itself with distinguished bravery in the 
action before Petersburg, the 2d of April, having re-captured 
Fort Mahone, and forced the enemy into the inner line of his 
work. First. Lieut. H. Burr Crandall wrote an interesting letter 
to Gov. Andrew, giving a description of this engagement, which 
has since been published. The regiment afterwards partici- 
pated in the grand review at Washington. 

The following members were accredited to the quota of Hing- 
ham, viz. : — 

»32 . 



ONE- YEAR MEN. 1 33 

CORPORALS. 

JAMES W. GRAY. 
Age 24. 
Enrolled in Co. K, Jan. 20, 1865. Mustered out July 16, 1865. 

JOHN E. WILSON. 

Age 24. 

Enrolled in Co. E, Sept. 22, 1864. Mustered out June 4, 1865. 

PRIVATES. 

WILLIAM H. ALLEN. 

Age 19. 

Enrolled in Co. F, Oct. 10, 1864. Mustered out July 16, 1865. 

THOMAS S. BRIGHAM. 

Age 19. 

Enrolled in Co. G, Nov. 19, 1864. Mustered out July 16, 1865. 

WAKEFIELD CARVER. 
Age 19. 
Enrolled in Co. F, Oct. 3, 1864. Mustered out July 16, 1865. 



• JAMES DALEY. 

Age 36. 
Enrolled in Co. I, Jan. 20, 1865. Mustered out July 16, 186^. 



JOHN R. DONAVEN. 
Age 18. 
Enrolled in Co F, Oct 7, 1864. Mustered out July 16, 1865. 



134 ■ HINGHAM IN THE CIVIL WAR. 

GEORGE C. DUNHAM. 

Age 23. 
Enrolled in Co. I, Jan. 20, 1865. Mustered out July 16, 1865. 

MICHAEL FRANEY. 

Age 39. 

Enrolled in Co. K, Dec. 30, 1864. Mustered out July 16, 1865. 



JOHN H. HAYES. 

Age 20. 
Enrolled in Co. K, Jan. 6, 1865. Mustered out July 16, 1865. 

JOSEPH H. HILTON. 

Age 20. 
Enrolled in Co. I, Jan. 6, 1865. Mustered out July 16, 1865. 



WILLIAM HILTON. 

Age 41. . 

Enrolled in Co, F. Oct. 7, 1864. Mustered out July 16, 1865. 

PATRICK J. KELLEY. 

Age 18. 
Enrolled in Co. C, Sept. 15, 1864. Mustered out June 4, 1865. 

• JAMES McNAMARA. 

Age 18. 

Enrolled in Co. F, Oct. 18, 1864. Discharged for disability 
Nov. 4, 1864. 

GEORGE W. R. PUTNAM. 

Age 20. 

Enrolled in Co. H, Jan. 5, 1865. Mustered out July 16, 1865. 



ONE-YEAR MEN. 1 35 

GEORGE L. RICH. 

Age 22. 
Enrolled in Co. H, Jan. 5, 1865. Mustered out May 15, 1865. 

JOHN A. WATSON. 
Age 21. 
Enrolled in Co. F, Oct. 2, 1864, Mustered out July 16, 1865. 



SIXTY-SECOND REGIMENT. 

This regiment was being recruited at the time Gen. Lee sur- 
rendered, but was mustered out before its organization was com- 
pleted, by order of the War Department, dated April 29, 1865. 
It had one man only from Hingham, viz. : — 

PRIVATE 

ANDREW WALLACE GARDNER. 

Born in Hingham, Dec. i, 1844. 

Enrolled in Co. C, March 31, 1865, for one year's ser\'ice. Mus- 
tered out at Readville, Mass., May 5, 1865. (See also chapter 
for One Hundred Days.) 



136 HINGHAM IN THE CIVIL WAR. 



FOURTH REGIMENT HEAVY ARTILLERY. 

This regiment was composed of twelve unattached companies 
that were recruited for one year. The companies were mustered 
into service at Gallop's Island, Boston Harbor, during the month 
of August, 1864, and afterwards consolidated into a regiment by 
Special Order No. 395 of the War Department dated Nov. 12, 

1864. The regiment was commanded by Col. William S. King, 
formerly lieutenant-colonel of the Thirty-fifth Mass. Vols., and 
was principally on garrison duty in the defences near Washing- 
ton. The adjutant-general of Massachusetts, in his report of 

1865, says this regiment was noted for its good drill and soldierly 
conduct during the entire period of its service. _ 

Among the enlistments were the following : — 

PRIVATES. 

JAMES MADISON CLEVERLY. 

Born in Hanover, Mass., Dec. 17, 1848; enlisted in Hingham. 
Enrolled in Co. G, Aug. 27, 1864. Mustered out June 30, 1865. 

JOHN A. FARRINGTON. 

Age 23. 
Enrolled in Co. C, Aug. 12, 1864. Mustered out June 17, 1865. 

GEORGE JACOB FEARING. 

Born in Hingham, Feb. 7, 1834. 
Enrolled in Co. G, Aug. 16, 1864. Mustered out June 17, 1865. 

WILLIAM MASON OILMAN. . 
Born in Boston, Feb. 17, 1847. 
Enrolled in Co. G, Aug. 27, 1864. Mustered out June 17, 1865. 



HENRY HART. 

Age 18. 
Enrolled in Co. C, Aug. 11, 1864. Mustered out June 17, 1865. 



ONE-YEAR MEN. 1 37 

CHARLES HELMS. 

Born in Northwood, N.H., Oct. i, 1825. 

Enrolled in Co. G, Aug. 22, 1864. Mustered out May 21, 1865. 
Was four months in Mount Pleasant Hospital confined by- 
rheumatism. 

MICHAEL LANDERS. 

• Age 19. 
Enrolled in Co. G, Aug. 18, 1864. Mustered out June 17, 1865. 



Since deceased. 



MICHAEL ROACH. 



Age 18. 
Enrolled in Co. G, Aug. 17, 1864, Mustered out June 17, 1865. 

CHARLES SHUTE. 

Born in Hingham, April 24, 1822 ; resident of Worcester, Mass. 

Enrolled in Co. D, Aug. 18, 1864. Mustered out at Fort 
Richardson, Va., June 17, 1865. 

MELZAR VINAL. 

Age 24. 

Enrolled in Co. C, Aug. 16, 1864. Mustered out June 17, 1865. 

HENRY B. VOGELL. 

Age 18. 
Enrolled in Co. G, Aug. 16, 1864. Mustered out June 17, 1865. 

JOSEPH N. WALLS. 

Born in Ireland, Dec. 27, 1836; resides in Hingham. 

Enrolled in Co. G, Aug. 16, 1864. Afterwards connected with 
the Twenty-third Regiment, unattached service, and lastly 
transferred to, and consolidated with, Co. G, of the Fourth 
Regiment Massachusetts Heavy Artillery, in which he first 
enlisted, and from which he was mustered out June 17, 1865, 
by reason of the close of the war. 'S 



138 HINGHAM IN THE CIVIL WAR. 



MISCELLANEOUS ASSIGNMENTS. 

The following were enrolled for the term of one year, and 
assigned to three-year regiments whose term of service had' not 
expired, viz, : — 

SERGEANTS. 

WILLIAM M. CARTER. 

Age 23. 

Enrolled in Co. H, Fifty-eighth Regiment, M. V. I., Aug. 18, 
1864. Mustered out July 14, 1865. 

OWEN MURPHY. 

Age 28. 

Enrolled in Co. C, Seventeenth Regiment, M. V. I., Sept. 20, 
1864. Service terminated June 30, 1865, order W.D., in Co.H. 

PRIVATES. 

WILLIAM CARTER. 

Age 43. 

Enrolled in Co. G, First Regiment Heavy Artillery, M. V., Sept. 
28, 1864. Mustered out May 3, 1865. 

FRANCIS MAYHEW. 

Age 18. 

Enrolled in Co. A, Third Regiment Heavy Artillery, M. V., 
Sept. 10, 1864. Mustered out June 14, 1865. 

GEORGE PEACOCK. 

Age 20. 



'■o'- 



Enrolled in Co. A, Third Regiment Heavy Artillery, M. V., Sept. 
28. 1864. Mustered out June 14, 1865. 



ONE-YEAR MEN. 



139 



DAVID PETTINGELL. 

Age 35. 

Enrolled in Co. C, Seventeenth Regiment, M. V. I., Sept. 24, 
1864. Service terminated June 30, 1865, order W. D., in Co. B. 

PHILIP SULLIVAN. 

Age 22. 

Enrolled in Co. C, Seventeenth 'Regiment, M. V. I., Sept. 23, 
1864. Service terminated June 30, 1865, order W. D, in 
Co. B. 

AARON D. SWAN. 

Age 40. 

Enrolled in Co, M, Third Regiment Heavy Artillery, M. V., Aug. 
2J, 1864. Mustered out June 17, 1865. 



LIST OF ONE-YEAR MEN. 



William H. Allen. 
Thomas S. Brigham. 
William Carter. 
William M. Carter. 
Wakefield Carver. 
James M. Cleverly. 
James Daley. 
John R. Donaven. 
George C. Dunham. 
John A. Farrington. 
George J. Fearing. 
Michael Franey. 
Andrew W. Gardner. 
William M. Gilman. 
James W. Gray. 
Henry Hart. 
John H. Hayes, 
Charles Helms. 
Joseph H. Hilton. 



William Hilton. 
Patrick J. Kelley. 
Michael Landers. 
Francis Mayhew. 
James McNamara. 
Owen Murphy. 
George Peacock. 
David Pettingell. 
George W. R. Putnam. 
George L. Rich. 
Michael Roach. 
Charles Shute. 
Philip Sullivan. 
Aaron D. Swan. 
Melzar Vinal. 
Henry B. Vogell. 
Joseph N. Walls. 
John A. Watson. 
John E. Wilson. 



CHAPTER IX. 



THREE YEARS MEN. 



Introductory — Calls of the National Government for Three Years' Men — The First Regi- 
ment — Second Regiment — Seventh Regiment — Ninth — Eleventh — Twelfth — Thir- 
teenth — Fourteenth — Fifteenth — Sixteenth — Seventeenth — Eighteenth — Nineteenth 
Twentieth — Twenty-First — Twenty-Second — Twenty-Third — Twenty-Fourth — Twenty- 
Sixth — Twenty-Eighth — Twenty-Ninth — Thirtieth — Thirty-First. 

SOON after the call of the National Government, issued on 
the 15th of April, 1861, for seventy-five thousand volunteers,- 
to serve for a term of three months, it was apparent that the 
war-cloud which had risen in the South was rapidly growing 
darker and more threatening. The States were no longer a unit. 
Thousands were gathering to the support of the standard of 
rebellion, and the indications of a severe and protracted struggle 
were unmistakable. 

To meet coming exigencies, it was at once decided, not only 
to place a numerous and efficient force in the field, but to enlist 
this force for a term of years. Accordingly on the 3d of May, 

1 86 1, a call was made for eighty- two thousand seven hundred 
and forty-eight men, divided between the regular army, volun- 
teers, and the navy, — the same to strve for t/ure years nnltss 
sooner discharged. 

Again, towards the close of the month of July following, 
another call was issued by the government for five hundred 
thousand men of this class, followed successively by calls July 2, 

1862, for three hundred thousand ; Oct. 17, 1863, three hundred 
thousand; Feb. i, 1864, two hundred thousand; and March 14, 
1864, two hundred thousand men. 

In addition to these, a call was made on the i8th of July, 
1864, for five hundred thousand men ; and on the 19th of Decem- 
ber, 1864, for three hundred thousand men, a portion only being 
for a term of three years. 



THREE YEARS' MEN. 



141 



In a very large majority of the regiments of volunteer infan- 
try, as well as in the regiments and companies of cavalry and 
heavy artillery, the town of Hingham was to a greater or less 
extent represented. 

A few words seem to be needed in this connection by way of 
explanation. The discrepancies between the statements given 
by those in the service, and the facts published by the State 
authorities, were found to be not only numerous, but often 
marked and important. Indeed, the instances of perfect con- 
formity appear to have been the exception rather than the gener- 
al rule. It will therefore be understood, that where the age, 
time or place of birth, date of muster or discharge, or other par- 
ticulars relating to time or locality, may be at variance with the 
published records, they are given in strict accordance with the 
facts supplied under the signature of the individual interested. 

Deceased soldiers and sailors are designated by an asterisk 
(*), and their records will be found in the chapter " In Memo- 
riam." 



FIRST REGIMENT INFANTRY. 

The First Regiment, Col. Robert Cowdin, was mustered 
into the service of the United States on the 15th of June, i86[. 
Immediately on the call for volunteers for a service of three 
years, Col. Cowdin visited Washington, and tendered himself 
and regiment for that period ; and this is understood to be the 
first regiment in the United States, armed and equipped, which 
was so tendered. 

It left the State on the day of muster, and on the 17th marched 
through the streets of Baltimore, — the first Massachusetts regi- 
ment which had passed through these streets to the seat of war 
since the massacre of the 19th of April, as it was also the first 
three years' volunteer regiment that reached the city of Washing- 
ton. 

After an active career, and leaving a noble record of bravery, 
it was mustered out at the expiration of the term of enlistment. 
May 25, 1864. 



142 HINGHAM IN THE CIVIL WAR. 

It took part in the following engagements, viz. : Bull Run, 
Williamsburg, Fair Oaks, Glendale, and other battles on the Pen- 
insula, Kettle Run, Second Bull Run, Chantilly, Fredericksburg, 
Chancellorsville, Gettysburg, Locust Grove, Wilderness, and 
Spottsyh'^nia. Of natives or residents of Hingham, the Massa- 
chusetts First included the following : — 

LIEUTENANT 

* ELIJAH B. GILL, Jun. 
Co. I. 



PRIVATES. 

* WILLIAM H. BEAL. 

Co. K. 

JOHN W. CHESSMAN. 

Enlisted from Hingham. Mustered Sept. 4, 1861, in Co. H. 
Transferred to Veteran Reserve Corps, Nov. 15, 1863. 

*JOHN WILLIAM GARDNER. 
Co. I. 

* GEORGE R KILBURN. 
Co. I. 

JOSEPH M. POOLE. 

Enrolled from " Hingham. Mustered Aug. 13, 1862, in Co. F. 
Discharged at expiration of term of service. May 25, 1864. 

* THOMAS TINSLEY. 

Co. K. 



THREE YEARS' MEN. 143 



SECOND REGIMENT. 

On the authority of the Adjutant General's Report, the 
Second was one of the Massachusetts regiments in Gen. 
Sherman's army, and followed him from the mountains to the 
sea. 

It was mustered into the service of the United States May 25, 
1861 ; left for the seat of war July 8, 1861 ; and was mustered 
out July 14, 1865. 

Its list of engagements includes Jackson, Front Royal, Win- 
chester, Cedar Mountain, Antietam, Fredericksburg, Chancellors- 
ville, Gettysburg, Atlanta, Raleigh, and many others. 

Of enlistments connected with Hingham, it contained one 
only, viz. : — 

ISAAC B. DAMON. 

Born in Scituate, age 35. 

Resident of Hingham. Enrolled from Weymouth, and Feb. 17, 
1862, mustered as private in Co. I. 

In early life he came from Scituate to Hingham, and was an 
apprentice with David A. Hersey, harness-maker. Soon after 
entering the army, he was appointed head of the brigade har- 
ness department, but during the march through South Caro- 
lina to the seaboard, took part in the more active, as well as 
more hazardous duties required for the success of the great 
enterprise. Escaping casualties and disease, he returned home 
with the regiment, and was mustered out March 27, 1865, hav- 
ing been in the service three years. 

So far as known, Mr. Damon was the only person from Hing- 
ham connected with the army of Gen. Sherman, who made the 
journey through " from the mountains to the sea." 



144 H INGHAM IN THE CIVIL WAR. 



SEVENTH REGIMENT. 

This regiment, recruited principally in Bristol County by Col. 
afterwards Major-Gen. Darius N. Couch, was mustered into the 
service of the United States at Taunton, Mass., June 15, 1861, 
and arrived at Washington, D.C., the 15th of July. It took part 
in the battles of the Peninsula, Fredericksburg, Chancellors- 
ville, Gettysburg, Wilderness, Spottsylvania, North Anna, and 
Cold Harbor. 

While in the service, it was almost constantly engaged in im- 
portant duties at the front. Upon return to Taunton, June 20, 
1864, it met with a welcome reception, and was mustered out the 
4th of July. There were two Hingham persons in this regi- 
ment, viz. : — 

PRIVATES. 

*WILLIAIVI DUNBAR, Jun. 
Co. K. 

EBENEZER FLINT ROBERTS. 

Born in Hingham, Aug. 28, 1837. 

Mustered into the United States service at Cambridge, Mass , 
Aug. II, 1862; joined Co. A, of the Seventh Regiment, 
M. V. I., at Sugar Loaf Mountain, Md. ; was on picket-duty 
with the regiment on the last day of the battle at Antietam ; 
took part in the battle of Fredericksburg, Va., in December, 
1862 ; also in the " Mud March" expedition. 

May 2, 1863, the regiment crossed the Rappahannock River, 
marching by night to Fredericksburg. The next day advanced 
up the Heights, and occupied the crest of Mary's Hill, captured 
two pieces of rebel artillery, and planted its colors upon a por- 
tion of the works from which the enemy had been driven. 
Continuing the pursuit towards Salem Church, the enemy was 
again met in strong force, and successfully encountered in a con- 
test which lasted until dark of that day. During the fight Mr. 



THREE YEARS' MEN. 1 45 

Roberts received a gun-shot wound in the left hand, which dis- 
abled him for duty. He was ordered to the rear, and afterwards 
sent to Campbell Hospital at Washington, from which place he 
obtained a furlough of thirty days, and came home. June 16, 
1863, he reported at the hospital in Washington, and shortly 
afterwards was sent with six hundred others to Chestnut Hill 
Hospital, Philadelphia, where he remained till Nov. 15, 1863; 
being then transferred to the Veteran Reserve Corps, Capt. 
Dillon, and appointed " orderly " to the executive officer at the 
hospital. In this capacity he continued till the regiment came 
home, and was mustered out the 7th of July. 

Mr. Roberts also served as a volunteer in the Lincoln Light 
Infantry at Fortress Monroe, Va. 



NINTH REGIMENT. 

The Ninth, composed principally of men of Irish birth or 
descent, was recruited by Col. Thomas Cass, and mustered into 
the United States service June 11, 1861. After being organized, 
the regiment was encamped at Long Island in Boston Harbor, 
until it embarked for Washington, where it arrived the 29th of 
June. Participating in most of the important engagements 
that took place between the Army of the Potomac and the Con- 
federate forces in Virginia, the Ninth won a high reputation for 
endurance and soldierly bearing, as well as for its discipline and 
bravery. 

Col. Cass was mortally wounded before Richmond, June 27, 
1862 ; and after being removed to Boston, died July 12, at his 
residence on North Bennet Street. Col. Patrick A. Guiney of 
Boston afterwards commanded the regiment. 

The Adjutant-general of Massachusetts, in his printed report 
for 1864, says, " The Ninth tvas one of our best regiments!' It 
was mustered out on Boston Common, June 21, 1864, by reason 
of the expiration of its term of service. 

Of the three men who were i-ecruited in Hingham for this 
regiment, only one was permanently connected with it, viz. : — 

19 



1^6 HINGHAM IN THE CIVIL WAh\ 

CORPORAL. 

JOHN JOYCE BREEN. 

Born in Hingham, Feb. 22, 1844. 

Enlisted in this town July 28, 1862 ; mustered into the United 
States service at Camp Cameron, Cambridge, Aug. 12, as 
private; promoted corporal Jan. 19. 1863. 

Early in September, 1862, he joined Co. K, then at Miner's 
Hill ; was in active service with the Army of the Potomac, 
taking part in the battles of Fredericksburg, Chancellorsville, 
Gettysburg, Mine Run, Wilderness, and Spottsylvania ; also in 
the engagements of Botler's Mill, Aldie Gap, Williamsport, 
Wapping Heights, Bristoe's Station, Rappahannock Station, &c. 

Corp. Breen was in the service twenty-two months and nine 
days. During this period he marched about twelve hundred 
miles ; was wounded by a gun-shot in the right arm at Spottsyl- 
vania, May 12, 1864 ; was then sent to Mt. Pleasant Hospital at 
Washington, D.C., and thence to the Satterlee Hospital at West 
Philadelphia, Pa. He was mustered out at Boston, Mass., June 
21, 1864, by reason of expiration of service. 



ELEVENTH REGIMENT. 

The Eleventh Regiment, Col. George Clark, jun., was organ- 
ized through the enterprising spirit and liberality of a few 
citizens of Boston, and may justly be termed a " Boston Regi- 
ment." It was gathered at Fort Warren ; afterwards moved to 
Camp Cameron, and left the State for the field of conflict on 
the 27th of June, 1861. 

Whether the extent of its service be considered, or its san- 
guinary nature, the record of the Eleventh will be surpassed by 
few, if any, of the regiments from the State. Commencing with 
the battle of First Bull Run, which took place a few weeks 
only after leaving Boston, it was successively engaged at York- 
town, Williamsburg, Fair Oaks, Savage Station, Glendale, Mai- 



THREE YEARS' MEAT. 1 47 

vera Hill, Bristoe's Station, Second Bull Run, Chantilly, Freder- 
icksburg, Chancellorsville, Gettysburg, Kelly's Ford, Locust 
Grove, Wilderness, Spottsylvania, North Anna, Tolopotomy, 
Cold Harbor, Petersburg, Strawberry Plains, Deep Bottom, Pop- 
lar Spring Church, and Boydton Road. 

The organization as a regiment ceased June 12, 1864, when 
the original members who had served three years were mustered 
out. 

The following are the enlistments of natives or residents of 
Hingham : — 

CAPTAIN 

* EDWIN HUMPHREY. 
Co. A. 

SERGEANTS. 

JAMES JACKSON HEALEY. 

Born in Boston, June 9, 1846. 

Enlisted at Boston, May 9, 1 861, as drummer in Co. E, Capt. 
James R. Bigelow, and was mustered June 13, 1861. After- 
wards, at his request, transferred as private to Co. K of the 
same regiment. 

Promoted corporal, next sergeant, and also served as mounted 
orderly to Gen. J. B. Carr. He was in every important engage- 
ment of the regiment, was twice wounded, first at Laurel Hill, 
next at Spottsylvania, and for a time confined in Bellevue Hos- 
pital, and also in the Campbell Hospital at Washington, D.C. 

Mustered out at Boston, Mass., by reason of expiration of 
term of service. 

* LEMUEL S. BLACKMAN. 

Co. K. 

* DANIEL HORACE BURR. 

Co. K. 



148 HTNGHAM IN THE CIVIL WAR. 

^ MUSICIANS. 

JAMES S. DUSTIN. 

Enrolled from Hingham, age 40. 

Mustered June 13, 1861. Included in the list of men returned 
by town authorities as being on the quota of Hingham. 

* NATHANIEL GILL. 

PRIVATES. 

WILLIAM TODD BARNES. 

Born in Hingham, July 5, 1S36. 

Enlisted at Boston for three years, and was mustered in Co. K, 
June 13, i86r. For some time after the close of the war he 
was in the insane hospital at Taunton, Mass. Since deceased. 

* CHARLES H. MARSH.- 
Co. K. 

WILLIAM CORNELIUS MILLER. 

Born in Salem, Mass., Nov. 29. 1836. 

Enlisted at Boston, Jan. 2, 1862, and the same day was mustered 
as private in Co. B. In the battle at Williamsburg, May 3, 
1862, Mr. Miller was severely wounde.d in the shoulder, and 
was obliged to lie upon the field through the night. The fol- 
lowing day, weak and suffering from loss of blood, he was 
removed to the field hospital, next to hospital at Baltimore, 
and finally sent to his home at Hingham. For a year his 
wound was the source of much pain, and he was finally mus- 
tered out at Boston for disability, Sept. 23, 1863. The sym- 
pathy and kindness extended on the part of his friends during 
his confinement are gratefully acknowledged. 

WALLACE THOMAS. 

Enlisted from Roxbury, Nov. 14, 1863, as private in Co. K, and 
was mustered out near Washington, D.C., July 14, 1865, hav- 
in'j: served to the close of the war. 



THREE YEARS' MEN. 



149 



Mr. Thomas was present in most of the engagements included 
in the record of the Eleventh Regiment. In the battles of Chan- 
cellorsville and Wilderness, — at one time victorious, and again 
repulsed, — the conflict was carried on in a spirit the most 
determined and heroic. Among the wounded, was the subject 
of this notice. Declining to enter the hospital for surgical aid, 
he manfully held his place in the ranks, and discharged his 
duties until perfect recovery. 

At the time of mustering out, chronic diarrhoea, that universal 
scourge of the soldier, had already begun its work. Lingering 
for nearly six years, he died at Waltham, Mass., March 14, 1871, 
and was buried in the cemetery at Hingham Centre. 

He was the son of William and Rachel (Beal) Thomas, and 
was born in Hingham, April 2, 1834. 



UNASSIGNED RECRUITS. 
WILLIAM BURTES. 

Enrolled from Hingham, 21 years of age. 
Mustered May 9, 1864; Transferred to Navy, June 6, 1864. 

CHARLES RICHARDSON. ' 

Enrolled from Hingham, age 21. 
Mustered May 16, 1864. 



TWELFTH REGIMENT. 

The Twelfth Massachusetts was raised by Fletcher Webster 
of Marshfield, who was commissioned colonel, and commanded 
the regiment until he was killed at the second battle of Bull 
Run, Aug. 30, 1862. It was afterwards under the command 
of Col. James L. Bates of Weymouth, Mass. This regiment 
originated as follows : — 

The Sunday after our troops were attacked in Baltimore, Md., 
a mass meeting was held in State Street, Boston, in response to 



ISO 



HINGHAM JN 7 HE CIVIL WAR. 



a call for volunteers issued by Fletcher Webster. The meeting 
was addressed by William Dehon, Esq., Edward Riddle, Hon. 
Charles L. Woodbury, Mr. Webster, and others. After reading 
the proclamation of Gov. Andrew, Mr. Webster said he had 
offered his services for the purpose of raising a regiment to 
serve the United States during the continuance of the existing 
difficulties. " I shall be ready on Monday," said Mr. Webster, 
" to enlist recruits. I know that your patriotism and valor will 
prompt you to the path of duty, and we will show to the world 
that the Massachusetts of 1776 is the same in 1861." 

The regiment was mustered into service June 26, 1861, and 
left the State July 23. It was engaged at Cedar Mountain, 
Second Bull Run, Antietam, Fredericksburg, Chancellorsville, 
Gettysburg, Wilderness, Spottsylvania, North Anna River, Cold 
Harbor, and Petersburg. July 8, 1864, it was mustered out of 
service at Boston. 

Connected with this regiment were the following natives or 
residents of Hingham, viz. : — 

CAPTAIN 

. * ALEXANDER HITCHBORN. 
Co. F. 

CORPORAL 

GEORGE GARDNER. 

Born in Hingham, Aug. 27, 1845. 

Enlisted at l^oston, June 26, 1861, in Co. E; afterwards pro- 
moted corporal. 

Was present in the engagement at Cedar Mountain (where he 
was corporal of the color-guard), Second Bull Run, Antietam, 
Fredericksburg, Chancellorsville, Wilderness, and other noted 
battles of the Twelfth Regiment. 

After the expiration of his term of service, he returned to 
Boston, June 25, and was there mustered out with the regiment, 
July 8, 1864. 

Mr. Gardner has since deceased. He was son of Aaron and 
Persis (Gushing) Gardner; and died of disease of the brain, at 
Hingham, Feb. 21, 1 871, aged twenty-five years. 



THREE YEARS' MEN. 151 

PRIVATES, 

*JOHN H. BLACKMAN. 
Co. H. 

LABAN F. GUSHING. 

Born in Hingham, age 30. 

Enrolled in Go, K, June 26, 1861, as a resident of Manchester ; 
termination of service Aug. 27, 1862, by reason of disability. 

JAMES D. DUNBAR. 

Born in Hingham, age 24. 

Enrolled in Go. H, June 26, 1 861, as a resident of Weymouth ; 
mustered out July 8, 1864, by expiration of service, as pris- 
oner, having been confined ten months. 

JOHN J. EDMONDS. 
Age 20. 

Enrolled in Go. G, June 26, 1861 ; transferred Jan. 15, 1864, to 
V. R. C. 

* JAMES FITZGERALD. 
Go. G. 

JACOB GARDNER, Jun. 

Born in Hingham, age 35. 

Enrolled in Co. H, July 12, 1861 ; termination of service, Feb. 
II, 1862, on account of disability. 

* SAMUEL SPENCER. 

Co. E. 

* HENRY SWEARS. 
Co. H. 

* FRANCIS THOMAS. 

Co. H. 



152 HINGHAM IN THE CIVIL WAR. 



THIRTEENTH REGIMENT. 

This regiment was mustered into service July 16, 1861 ; left 
the State July 30, and was mustered out Aug. i, 1864. 

Its record includes the following engagements, viz. : Second 
Bull Run, Antietam, Fredericksburg, Chanceilorsville, Gettys- 
burg, Wilderness, Spottsylvania, North Anna, Cold Harbor, and 
Petersburg. Of those connected with Hingham, there were — 



PRIVATES. 

WILLIAM WALLACE SPRAGUE. 

Born in Hingham, age 19. 

Enlisted from Boston, and mustered July 20, 1861, as private in 
Co. B. Taken prisoner at Gettysburg, and carried to Rich- 
mond, Va. He was confined for eight months in Belle Isle: 
alterwards paroled v^ith six hundred others, and came to 
Annapolis, Md. 

■ Mr. Sprague states that the sufferings experienced in this 
prison from hunger, cold, and neglect were beyond description, 
and could only be known to those who had the misfortune to be 
confined there. " It were far better," he says, " to fall upon the 
battle-field, than to be taken prisoner, and slowly die from star- 
vation and disease." 

He was afterwards detailed as clerk in the quartermaster's 
department. 

Mustered out Aug. i, 1864, by reason of expiration of service. 

GEORGE WASHINGTON STODDER. 

Born in Hingham, age 29. 

Enlisted at Boston, and mustered as private in Co. H, July 28. 
1862. 

Mustered out with the regiment, Aug. i, 1864. 



THREE YEARS' MEN. . 153 



FOURTEENTH REGIMENT. " 

The Fourteenth, generally recognized as the " Essex Regi- 
ment," was composed entirely of companies from Essex County. 
On the 25th of June, it was ordered to Fort Warren ; July 5 
mustered into the service of the United States, and left Mas- 
sachusetts Aug. 7, 1861. 

Jan. I, 1862, by orders from the War Department, the regi- 
ment was changed from an infantry to heavy artillery. 

It included two enlistments from Hingham, viz., Privates 

WILLIAM CARTER, and 

(For record of Mr. Carter, see First Regiment Heavy Artillerj'.) 

ANTON TAPR 

Enrolled from Hingham, age 35. 

Jan. I, 1862, mustered out for re-enlistment, and transferred to 
Co. L, First Regiment Heavy Artillery. Mr. Tapp was a 
o:ood soldier, and left the service with an honorable record. 
He has since deceased. 



FIFTEENTH REGIMENT. 

This regiment was mustered into the service of the United 
States July 12, 1861 ; left Massachusetts Aug. 8, 1861 ; and was 
mustered out July 28, 1S64. 

Its list of engagements includes Ball's Bluff, battles on the 
Peninsula, Antietam, Fredericksburg, Chancellorsville, Gettys- 
burg, Bristoe's Station, Robertson's Tavern, Wilderness, and all 
the battles from the Rapidan to Petersburg, in which the 
Second Army Corps took part. 

Those soldiers whose term of service had not expired at the 
date of muster-out of the regiment were transferred to the 

Twentieth Regiment, 

20 



154 



HINGHAM IN THE CIVIL WAR. 



It included the followinsr enlistment from Hin2;ham : — 



JOHN E. MORSE. 

Resident of Hingham. 

Enlisted from Fitchburg, Mass., July 12, 1861, as private in Co. 
B ; discharged July 28, 1864, by reason of expiration of term 
of service. 

Taken prisoner at Ball's Bluff, and was four months at Rich- 
mond ; rejoined his regiment ; then, being disabled by sickness 
at Harrison's Landing, was sent to hospital at Little York, 
where he continued for some time acting as ward-master. 

For bravery and meritorious conduct was promoted captain 
of a company belonging to the Invalid Corps. The organization, 
however, was soon after dissolved, its services not being required. 

In May, 1864, he was wounded in the wrist, and being again 
disabled, returned home on a furlough. 

At the time of his capture, he was connected with the Twen- 
tieth Regiment under Col. Lee, When the retreat commenced, 
he, in company with Col. Lee and others, hastened to the banks 
of the river, but found no means for crossing the stream. Fail- 
ing in their attempts to construct a raft, and seeing no prospect 
of escape. Col. Lee advised the party to give up. Capt. Morse 
and one or two others decided not to yield without compulsion, 
and started off in another direction. They had proceeded but a 
short distance, when they were met by a number of mounted 
rebel pickets, to whom they made peaceful surrender. Being 
ordered to mount the horses, they obeyed, forthwith, rode to the 
enemy's camp, and thence to Richmond. As prisoners they 
received kind treatment, and their captors were represented as 
gentlemen. 



THREE YEARS' MEM. 155 



SIXTEENTH REGIMENT. 

The Sixteenth Regiment, Col. Powell T. Wyman, was mus- 
tered into the United States service by companies at Camp 
Cameron in North Cambridge, a large proportion of the enlist- 
ments being from Middlesex County. 

Among the enrolled were four men reckoned upon the quota 
of Hingham, viz. : — 

* DENNIS MEAGHER. 
Co. A. 

* DON PEDRO WILSON. 
Co. A. 

* MICHAEL FEE. 
Co. E. 

* CHARLES W. BLOSSOM. 
Co. I. 

All were either killed or died in the service, and their records 
will be found in succeeding pages of the volume. 



1^6 HINGHAM IN THE CIVIL WAR. 



SEVENTEENTH REGIMENT. 

The Seventeenth Regiment was organized at Lynnfield, Mass. 
The enhstments were largely from the County of Essex ; though, 
as at first constituted, it contained one company from the County 
of Middlesex, and one from Suffolk. 

It left the State Aug. 23, 1861 ; for a short time was stationed 
at Baltimore, and then moved to Newbern, N.C. 

It was present in the engagement at Kinston, Goldsboro', and 
Bachelder's Creek. 

Mustered out at Greensboro', N.C, July 11, 1865, and finally 
discharged from the service of the United States at Readville, 
Mass., July 26, 1865. 

The number killed in battle was eleven, and one hundred and 
forty-two died from wounds or disease. 

The enlistments from Hingham, so far as known, were three, 
viz. : — 

SERGEANT 

- OWEN MURPHY. 

Age 23. 

First enlisted from Danvers, Mass., July 22, i86r, as private in 
Co. C; discharged Aug. 3, 1864, by reason of expiration of 
term of enlistment; Sept. 20, 1864, re-enlisted as sergeant 
from Hingham in Co. C ; and June 30, 1865, was mustered out 
by order of War Department, being at the time member of 
Co. H. 

PRIVATES. 

DAVID PETTINGELL. 

Age 35. 
Enlisted for one year. Served on the quota of Hingham. 

PHILIP SULLIVAN. 
Age 22. 
Enlisted for one year. Served on the quota of Hingham. 



THREE YEARS' MEN. 157 



EIGHTEENTH REGIMENT. 

To the loyalty and patriotic spirit of the citizens of Duxbury, 
Middleboro', Hanover, Dedham, and Wrentham, is due the origin 
of this notedly excellent regiment. Companies, previously 
formed and drilled in these towns, were ordered into camp at 
Dedham, Mass., by the governor, in July, 1 861, and thus made 
the nucleus for the Eighteenth. To these were soon added 
companies from Taunton, Ouincy, and Plymouth, and in Novem- 
ber a company from the town of Carver, swelling the number to 
nine hundred and ninety-six men. 

The regiment was mustered into the service of the United 
States on the 27th of August, i86r, but, as a battalion of eight 
companies, left Massachusetts Aug. 26, under orders for Wash- 
ington. 

The adjutant-general states, that during the following autumn 
opportunity was offered, and favorably improved, for the instruc- 
tion and drilling of the regiment ; and the command, thus obtain- 
ing a high degree of discipline, and a commendable proficiency 
in military drill and exercise, was complimented by the general 
of the division, George McClellan, with a new and complete out- 
fit of uniforms, camp-equipage, &c., imported from France by the 
government, being the same worn by the CJiasseiirs a pied. 

The subsequent history of the regiment, was as brilliant as it 
was active and sanguinary. It shared in the battles on the 
Peninsula, and was engaged at Second Bull Run, Shepardstown, 
Fredericksburg, Chancellorsville, Gettysburg, Rappahannock 
Station, Wilderness, Spottsylvania, Cold Harbor, Petersburg, 
and Weldon Railroad, The casualties were numerous, and the 
regiment suffered severely ; the killed and wounded numbering 
nearly two hundred and fifty. 

Made up largely by enlistments from Plymouth County, the 
Eighteenih may be justly termed the "Old Colony Regi- 
ment." Few organizations have made a better record, as the 
following sketches of those who shared in its experiences will 
serve to show : — 



1^8 HINGHAM IN THE CIVIL WAR. 

COLONEL 

THOMAS WESTON. 

Age 34. 

Enrolled from Middleborough ; entered the service as captain, 
Co. E, Aug. 20, 1861 ; promoted major Oct. 15, 1863. Brevet 
lieutenant-colonel, Sept. 2, 1864, at expiration of service. 

Col. Weston has been a resident of Hingham since the war. 

MAJOR 

BENJAMIN F. MESERVEY. 

Born in Hallowell, Me., July 16, 1833. 

At the commencement of the war Major Meservey was a 
resident of Ouincy ; and upon the first call for Massachusetts 
troops left, April 16, 1861, with the company from that town 
(Co. H, Fourth Mass. Volunteer Militia), in the capacity of 
second lieutenant. During the three months' service, he per- 
formed all the duties required in the most efficient manner. He 
was engaged with his company in the first battle of the war at 
Big Bethel. At the expiration of his term of service, he pro- 
ceeded to recruit a company for three years, which was attached 
to the Eighteenth Mass. Volunteers ; was commissioned as cap- 
tain, and started again for the seat of war on the 2d of August, 
1 86 1, only a month having elapsed after the expiration of his 
first term of service. 

The Eighteenth Regiment formed a part of the Army of the 
Potomac. It was engaged at the Battle of Hanover Court 
House, performed efficient service during the siege of Yorktown, 
and was engaged at the Battle of Gaines' Mill. Major Meservey 
was present with his command in these several engagements, 
and also at the battles of Antietam and Shepardstown Ford. 
At the battle of Second Bull Run the regiment suffered severely, 
and Major Meservey was wounded in the head. 

The Eighteenth was again engaged at the battle of Freder- 
icksburg, where in the charge on St. Mary's Heights the loss 
sustained was great, having advanced nearer the works of the 



THREE YEARS' MEN. 1 59 

enemy than any other troops during that terrible engagement. 
This regiment participated in the battles of Chancellorsville, 
Gettysburg, and the expedition to Mine Run, in all of which 
Major Meservey sustained an active and honorable part. He was 
also present at the battles of the Wilderness and Laurel Hill, 
and commanded the regiment during the campaign under Gen. 
Grant, from Spottsylvania to Petersburg, which included the 
battles at North Anna, Bethesda Church, Cold Harbor, and 
in front of Petersburg. He was also engaged in the fight at the 
Weldon Railroad. 

The regiment returned to Massachusetts at the expiration of 
its term of enlistment, and was mustered out Sept. 2, 1864. 
Few ors^anizations from our State can show so clean a record as 
the Eighteenth Massachusetts. Major Meservey's service was 
closely identified with his regiment, and was marked by bravery 
and efficiency. 

At the time of mustering out, he received promotion to brevet- 
major for gallant and meritorious conduct. 

Major Meservey became a citizen of Hingham soon after the 
close of his military service. 

HENRY JONES. 
Born in Hingham, March 4, 1841. 

In July, 1 86 1, enlisted at Duxbury, where he resided at the 
time, and on the 24th of August was mustered at Readville into 
Co. E, Capt. Thomas Weston. Promoted sergeant in January, 
1864. 

On the 1st of September he joined the Army of .the Potomac, 
and for the entire winter of 186 1-2 was stationed at the front 
for outpost duty. 

In April he was engaged before the defences of Yorktown, 
acting as skirmisher, and in support of the batteries ; and from 
the middle to the close of the month, or for nearly three weeks, 
there were few days in which he was not to a greater or less 
extent exposed to the fire of the enemy. 

On the 30th of August, after a series of marches the most pro- 
tracted and exhausting, he arrived at Bull Run, and took part in 



l6o BINGHAM IN THE CIVIL WAR. 

an engagement which proved one of the most disastrous of the 
war. During the battle he was unfortunately wounded in the 
hand ; and, being thus incapacitated for service, three months 
were spent in the Fourteenth-street Hospital at Washington 
before complete recovery. 

In the long list of battles, including Second Bull Run, Chan- 
cellorsville, Gettysburg, Rappahannock Station, Mine Run, 
Wilderness, Spottsylvania, Cold Harbor, and Petersburg, follow- 
ing as they did in rapid succession, he witnessed a reduction 
from the ranks of 250 men. In a single struggle more than 
one-half of the men were killed or wounded. 

While in front of Petersburg, Serg. Jones was seriously 
wounded by a Minnie ball from tlie rifle of one of the enemy's 
sharpshooters. Lying down at the time, the missile entered his 
cheek, shattering his jaw, and at last found a lodgement in the 
side of the body. Thus completely disabled, he was conveyed 
to the City Point Hospital, and shortly after removed to the hos- 
pital at Alexandria,, where he remained for some weeks until the 
expiration of his term of enlistment, when, in an enfeebled con- 
dition, he returned with the remnant of the regiment to Boston, 
and at Readville was honorably discharged from service. 

SERGEANT 

* WILLIAM HENRY JONES, Jun. 

Co. K. 

CORPORAL 

* NELSON FRANCIS CORTHELL. 

Co, A. 

PRIVATES. 

* THOMAS CHURCHILL. 
Co. A. 

JAMES M. DOWNER. 
Enrolled from Hingham, age 21. 



THREE-YEARS' MEN. . i6l 

Mustered Aug. 25, 1863, in Co. A. Included in the official list 
returned by the selectmen, of soldiers serving for the quota 
of the town. Service terminated Jan. 9, 1864, by reason of 
disability. 

JOHN Q. JACOB. 

Enrolled from Hingham, age 21, 

Mustered Aug. 24, 1861. Private in Co. K. Afterwards trans- 
ferred to Veteran Reserve Corps. 

* WILLIAM HENRY JONES. 
Co. K. 

SAMUEL THAXTER MEARS. 

Born in Hingham, Aug. i, 1837. 

May 23, 1 86 1, enlisted at Duxbury, Mass., and was mustered 
July 26, 1 86 1. 

He was at the battle before Yorktown, in the engagement at 
Charles City Court House, and at the bombardment at Harrison 
Landing. In the seven days' fight he was sun-struck ; and being 
thus disabled, was for more or less of the time confined to the 
hospital at Frederick, Va., and at Baltimore, Md., for ten months. 
Prompted by feelings of patriotism and a- sense of duty, he 
several times rejoined his regiment, but was as often obliged to 
return to the hospital. 

On the 23d of May, 1864, he was mustered out at Washington, 
D.C., by reason of expiration of term of service. 

* WILLIAM WESLEY ROBINSON. 
Co. K. 

JEREMIAH SPENCER. 

Enrolled from Hingham, age 20. 

Mustered in Co. K, Aug. 24, 1861 ; mustered out Sept. 2, 1864, 

by reason of expiration of term of enlistment. 
21 



1 62 HINGHAM IN THE CIVIL WAR. 

GEORGE E. SMITH. 

Enrolled from Hingham, age 22. 

Co. G. 

Mustered Aug. 24, 1861 ; discharged Sept. 2, 1864, by reason 
of expiration of term of service. 

EDWARD L. TRACY. 

Enrolled from Hingham, age iS. 

Mustered in Co. K, Aug. 24, 1861 ; time of discharge from 
service unknown. 

ROBERT TUFTS. 

Enrolled from Hingham, age 18. 

A member of Co. K, and mustered Aug. 24, i86r ; time of 
discharge from service not received. 



NINETEENTH REGIMENT. 

The Nineteenth Regiment, Col. Edward W. Hincks, was 
organized and recruited at Camp Schouler, Lynnfield ; a large 
proportion of the enlistments being from Essex County. It 
left the State on the 28th of August, 1861, and includes in its 
list of engagements nearly every battle which occurred in the 
Army of the Potomac during the war. 

The Hingham men in this regiment, were 

MUSICIAN 

SAMUEL BRONSDON. 

Born at Milton, Mass., Nov. 29. 1819. 

Resides in Hingham. Enlisted at Boston, Oct. 14, 1861, on 
Hingham quota, and was mustered into the United States 
service the same day as first-class musician of the Nineteenth 
Regiment Band. 



THREE-YEARS' MEN. 



163 



Mr. Bronsdon joined the regiment Nov. 4, 1861, while 
encamped near Edward's Ferry, about two miles from Pools- 
ville, Md. Here he remained until Dec. 4, when the regiment 
was ordered to Muddy Branch, Md. March 12, 1862, the Nine- 
teenth was sent to Harper's Ferry to join a brigade then on its 
way to re-enforce Gen. Banks in the Shenandoah Valley. 
Marched to Berryville. On the 15th, had orders to return 
to Harper's Ferry ; and the 24th was transported by rail 
to Washington, thence to Fortress Monroe, arriving there the 
1st of April. Marched to Hampton, and joined the Grand 
Army of the Potomac at the commencement of the Peninsular 
Campaign under Gen. McClellan. Proceeded up the Peninsula 
to Yorktown ; thence sailed, May 6, for West Point, reaching 
it in the night. The next morning a light engagement occurred. 

During McClellan's retreat in the seven days' fight, the Nine- 
teenth was actively engaged at the battles of Fair Oaks, Peach 
Orchard, Savage Station, White Oak Swamp, Glendale, and 
Malvern Hill ; and its loss of officers and men was very severe. 

In all these engagements Mr, Bronsdon was called to perform 
an important service ; it being the duty of a musician on the 
battle-field to assist in removing the wounded, to aid the sur- 
geons in camp hospital, and to bury the dead of the regiment. 
For the performance of these duties, which required so much of 
nerve as well as of forbearance and gentleness, Mr. Bronsdon 
was eminently qualified. 

He was mustered out at Harrison's Landing, Aug. 10, 1862, 
by reason of an act of Congress discharging all regimental 
bands. 

Mr. Bronsdon was also an original member of the Lincoln 
Light Infantry, and served three months with the company at 
Fortress Monroe. 

PRIVATE 

JAMES McKAY. 

Age 24. 

A resident of, and accredited to, Hingham ; enrolled Aug. 
21, i86r, in Co. I ; discharged Dec. 15, 1861, on account of 
disability. 



r64 HINGHAM IN THE CIVIL WAR. 



TWENTIETH REGIMENT. 

The Twentieth Regiment, Col. Robert L. Lee, was recruited 
at Camp Massasoit, Readville, and left Massachusetts Sept. 4, 
1 86 1 . In its list of engagements are included twenty-seven of the 
most noted battles which occurred in and about Virginia during 
the civil war. The casualties were numerous : one. hundred and 
ninety-two were killed in action ; and what may be regarded as a 
somewhat remarkable fact, a similar number died from wounds 
or disease, making a total loss of three hundred and eighty-four 
men. 

The regiment was mustered out after the close of the war, 
July 16, 1865. 

The enlistments from Hingham in the Twentieth were limited. 
They were as follows : — 

MUSICIAN. 

EDWARD O. GRAVES. 

Enrolled from Hingham, age 43. 

Enlisted July 23, 1861, in Co. K, and was discharged for disa- 
bility April II, 1863. After recovery, re-enlisted in Fifty- 
ninth Regiment ; then transferred to the Fifty-seventh. Mr. 
Graves is included in the list officially returned by the select- 
men of Hingham as being on the quota of the town. 



PRIVATES. 

DANIEL DALEY. 

A resident of Hingham, age 25. 

Enrolled from Boston ; mustered Aug. 30, 1862, as private in Co. 
H. Was wounded at Fredericksburg, and discharged Aug. 
6, 1864, by reason of expiration of term of service. Returned 
by the selectmen as being on the quota of the town. 



THREE-YEARS' MEN. 1 65 

GEORGE GRAMBURG. 

Enrolled from Hingham, age 19. 

Mustered May 7, 1864, and discharged July 16, 1865, by reason 
of close of the war. 

JOHN E. MORSE. 

Transferred from Co. B, Fifteenth Regiment, which see for 
record. 

*ALVIN TOWER. 

Co. A. 



TWENTY-FIRST REGIMENT. 

This regiment, which was recruited at Camp Lincoln, Worces- 
ter, included two enlistments only, connected with the town of 
Hingham, viz. : — 

GEORGE A. GROVER. 

Enrolled from Hingham, age iS. -- 

Mr. Grover was a volunteer member of the Lincoln Light In- 
fantry, and left Hingham with the company, April 17, 1861, for 
Fortress Monroe, serving three months. Aug.. 23 of the same 
year enlisted at Boston as private in Co. E, Twenty-first Regi- 
ment, M. V. I., three years, and was mustered out March 18, 
1863, by reason of disability from wounds received in battle. 
He was in the engagements of Roanoke Island, N.C., Newbern, 
Camden, Second Bull Run, Va., Chantilly, South Mountain, Md., 
Antietam, and Fredericksburg, Va. 

ANDREW JACOB. 

Born in Hingham, Feb. 8, 1S43. 

Mustered in Co. G, of the Twenty-first Regiment, M. V. I., 
Aug. 23, 1861, having enlisted in Boston, in July, for three 
years. 



1 66 HINGHAM IN THE CIVIL WAR. 

Consigned to the Department of North Carolina, he was in 
the engagements at Roanoke Island, Newbern, and South Mills. 

In January of 1863, by reason of sickness, he was sent to the 
hospital at Alexandria, and soon after transferred to Providence, 
R.I., where by virtue of surgeon's certificate of disability he was 
honorably discharged from service, March 16, 1863. 

The Twenty-first was engaged at Roanoke Island, New- 
bern, Camden, Second Bull Run, Chantilly, South Mountain, 
Antietam, Fredericksburg, and Blue Spring, as well as at other 
localities after the above were mustered out of service. 



TWENTY-SECOND REGIMENT. 

The Twenty-second Regiment was organized by Hon. Henry 
Wilson at Lynnfield, Mass., and was mustered into the service 
of the United States Oct. 5, 1861. Beginning with the battles 
before Richmond, it was present in almost every prominent 
engagement up to that before Petersburg ; the losses sustained 
being severe. During the campaign one hundred and forty- 
one were killed in battle, and one hundred and forty-three died 
from wounds and disease. 

Of natives or residents of Hingham, it included the following, 
viz. : — 

PRIVATES. 

CHARLES F. ALGER. 

Age 20. 

Enrolled from Boston. Member of Co. K. Mustered Sept. 6, 
i86r, and discharged Oct. 17, 1864, by reason of expiration of 
term of service. A resident of Hingham since the war. 

*JOHN B. CREASE. 
Co. A. 



THREE-YEARS' MEN. 1 67 

WILLIAM B. GUSHING. 
Co. D. 

WILLIAM KIMBALL GOULD. 

Co. F. 

Afterwards in Fifth Battery, then in Thirty-second Regiment, 
where his general record will be found. 

*SEWALL PUGSLEY. 
Co. F. 



TWENTY-THIRD REGIMENT. 

This regiment left Massachusets Nov. 11, 1861, in com- 
mand of Col. John Kurtz ; and after being encamped for a time 
at Annapolis, Md., set sail for Pamlico Sound, where it became 
a part of the famous Burnside expedition to North Carolina. In 
this department it was engaged at Roanoke, Newbern, Rawles' 
Mills, Kinston, Whitehall, Goldsboro', Wilcox Bridge, and Win- 
ton, as well as in many important expeditions into the inte- 
rior. 

On the 17th of October, 1863, it re-embarked for Fortress 
Monroe, and subsequently was engaged in various undertakings 
with the Army of the James ; was in the battle at Smithfield, 
Heckman's Farm, Arrowfield Church ; and in the fight at 
Drury's Bluff, lost eighty-nine men, in killed, wounded, and 
missing, out a force of two hundred and twenty. 

The Twenty-third was among the regiments detached from 
Gen. Butler's command, May 29, 1864, to re-enforce the Army of 
the Potomac, and was engaged at Cold Harbor, and other battles 
before Richmond. 



1 68 HINGHAM IN THE CIVIL WAR. 

Re-embarking for Newbern, N.C., Sept. 4, 1864, it was after- 
wards in the expedition to Kinston, March 8, 9, and 10, 1865 
where the regiment lost, in killed, wounded, and missing, one 
officer and thirty men. It was mustered out as a regiment Sept. 
25, 1864; but the re-enlisted men, and recruits whose term had 
not expired, remained in service under the same designation 
until June 25, 1865, when they were discharged. 

The Hingham persons in this regiment were : — 



SERGEANT 

GEORGE EDSON HUMPHREY. 

Born in Hingham, Jan. 4, 1839. 

Mustered as private in Co. H, Sept. 28, 1861 ; promoted corpo- 
ral at Newbern, N.C., May i, 1862; sergeant at Newport 
News, Va., Nov. 28, 1863; mustered out Oct. 13, 1864, by 
reason of expiration of service. 

Serg. Humphrey has a good military record. He partici- 
pated in all the engagements and expeditions of the regiment 
during his connection with it. Was in the attack on the rebel 
fleet and the forts defending Roanoke Island, Feb. 7, 1862 ; also 
the day following (Feb. 8), when about three thousand prisoners, 
two thousand stand of arms, and forty guns were taken, the 
enemy capitulating to Gen. Foster. Also in the battles of New- 
bern, Southrwest Creek, Kinston, &c. 

At Whitehall, N.C., Dec. 16, 1862, the regiment lost sixty- 
seven in killed and wounded. Serg. Humphrey was among the 
latter, having been shot in the leg. As the wound did not heal, 
he was granted a furlough of thirty days, and came to Boston, 
where he received surgical treatment in the hospital. He after- 
wards rejoined the regiment, and shared its hardships and priva- 
tions, as well as its honors and victories. 

At the commencement of the war, he went to Fortress Mon- 
roe with the Lincoln Light Infantry (Co. I, Fourth Regiment) 
of Hingham, having volunteered as a substitute for one of its 
original members. 



THREE-YEARS' MEN. 1 69 

CORPORAL 

EDWARD CHURCHILL BLOSSOM. 

Born in Hingham, Jan 30, 1838. 

May 21, 1 86 1, enlisted at Boston as private in Co. A (Wightman 
Rifles), Twenty-ninth Regiment, M. V. L, three years, tem- 
porarily connected with the Fourth Regiment, M. V. M. 
July 6, 1 86 1, was discharged for impaired sight, and returned 
to Hinscham. 



"&' 



Re-enlisted Sept. 28, 1861, and entered the service as private 
in Co. A, of the Twenty-third Regiment, M. V. L, three years, 
for quota of Hingham ; promoted corporal Sept. 25, 1862. 

Mr. Blossom was among the first of our townsmen who 
enlisted for the term of three years, and his service was active 
and protracted. In the Wightman Rifles from Boston, he was 
at the battle of Big Bethel, Va., and with the Twenty-third 
shared in the long list of engagements allotted to this regiment 
in the Department of the Carolinas ; being present at Roanoke 
Island, South-west Creek, Kinston, Whitehall, Goldsboro', 
Trenton, the defence of Newbern, Morehead City, and numerous 
other localities, till February, 1864, when, being disabled by sick- 
ness, he was transferred to the Veteran Reserve Corps. From 
this time he was stationed at Point Lookout, Md., guarding pris- 
oners till the expiration of his term of enlistment, Oct. 27, 1864. 



PRIVATES. 

ANDREW JACKSON CLARK. 

Born in Hingham, Dec. 13, 1837. 

Co. H. 

Enlisted Sept. 28, 1861 ; mustered at Lynnfield, Oct. 9; dis- 
charged Oct. 13, 1864, by reason of expiration of term of ser- 
vice. 

Mr. Clark served under Gens. Burnside, Foster, Butler, and 
Heckman ; participating in most of the River and Sound expe- 



I70 



HINGHAM IN THE CIVIL WAR. 



ditions of the first brigade, second division, Eighteenth Army 
Corps ; was at the attack on Fort Sumter in Charleston Harbor 
by our monitors ; at the rescue of Little Washington, N.C. ; at 
Newport News, Norfolk, and Portsmouth, Va., and later with 
the Army of the James. He was also at Roanoke Island, New- 
bern, N.C, South-west Creek, Kinston, Whitehall, Goldsboro', 
Smithfield, Va., Heckman's Farm, Arrowfield Church, as well as 
at Petersburg, and other battles before Richmond. 

Having joined the Lincoln Light Infantry as a volunteer at 
the first call of the president, Mr. Clark's entire service covers a 
period of about three years and four months. In this time he 
was neither wounded nor seriously ill. He had no furloughs. 

* SAMUEL M. LINCOLN. 
Co. H. 



TWENTY-FOURTH REGIMENT. 

This regiment was raised by Col., afterwards Brig.-Gen. Ste- 
venson, and left the State Dec. 9, 1861, for Annapolis, Md., 
where it remained till January, 1862, when it joined the Burn- 
side Expedition. 

It was engaged in the Department of the Carolinas, for a 
time was stationed in Florida, and in 1864 was united with the 
Tenth Army Corps in the Virginia Campaign. 

Its record of battles includes those of the Carolinas, as well as 
many in the Department of Virginia up to the siege of Peters- 
burg, and the engagement at Four-Mile Run Church and Darby 
Town Road. 

It was mustered out of the service at Richmond, Va.', Jan. 20, 
and arrived in Boston Jan. 24, 1866. 

Of enlistments from the*town of Hingham, there were, so far 
as known, but five, viz. : — 



THREE-YEARS' MEN. 171 

MUSICIANS. 

GEORGE LINCOLN GARDNER. 

Born in Hingham, Aug. 31, 1838. 

Enlisted and was mustered into service at Boston, Sept. 30, 
1 86 1, as private in Co. E. 

Re-enlisted Jan. 3, 1864. Detailed for the Pioneer Corps, 
he served in this capacity up to June, 1863, when he joined 
the regimental band. In the Department of the Carolinas he 
was present in the engagements at Ravvle's Mills, Kinston, 
Whitehall, Goldsboro,' Morris Island, and the siege of Charles- 
ton. 

During this time he was despatched to Long Island, Boston 
Harbor, for the charge of recruits and conscripts ; but, after a 
short service, applied for permission to rejoin the regiment, then 
stationed at St. Augustine, which was granted. It was at this 
locality he re-enlisted, and obtained the thirty-days' furlough 
allowed in consideration. 

He was next in the Department of Virginia, under Gen. 
Butler. Was at Bermuda Hundred, Green Valley, Drury's 
Bluff, Bethesda Church, siege of Petersburg, besides other im- 
portant engagements, and lastly sent to Bermuda Landing for 
provost duty, where he remained until the fall of Richmond. 
Proceeding at once to the captured city, he remained on duty 
here till Jan. 20, 1866, when by G. O., No. 2, Headquarters War 
Department of Va., he was discharged from service, four years 
and five months being included in his terms of enlistment. 

Mr. Gardner adds, that whatever may have been the practice 
with other regiments, the band connected with the Twenty- 
fourth was required to bear its part in engagements. Pending 
these events, instruments were laid aside, stretchers for the con- 
veyance of the wounded were shouldered, and the musician and 
soldier shared in the common danger of the conflict. 



172 HINGHAM lA^ THE CIVIL WAR. 

JOHN WARE LINCOLN. 

Born in Hingham, age 26. 

Enlisted first from Northborough, Sept. 28, 1861, as private in Co. 
C ; discharged for re-enlistment Jan. 3, 1864 ; and was serving 
as principal musician at the time of final mustering out, Sept. 
9, 1865. 

PRIVATES. 

ALBERT F. BARNES. 
Born in Hingham, age 24. 

Enlisted from Cohasset ; mustered as private in Co. A, Aug. 14, 
1S62 ; discharged Dec. 4, 1864, by reason of expiration of 
term of service. 

* WILLIAM HENRY BEAL. 
Co. A. 

JAMES BOOTH. 
Age 21. 

Enlisted from Plingham, and returned by the selectmen as upon 
the town's quota; mustered May 16, 1862. Unassigned 
recruit. 

JUSTIN A. CARVER. 

Age 22. 

From Marshfield. Enlisted for the quota of Hingham ; mustered 
Oct. 17, 1 86 1, as private in Co. C ; discharged on account of 
disability, Oct. 5, 1862, having been in service nearly one year. 

THOMAS CONWAY. 

Age 19. 

Served for the quota of Hingham, and was mustered Oct. 22, 
1 86 1, as private in Co. F ; mustered out by reason of expira- 
tion of term of enlistment, Oct. 22, 1864. 

Mr. Conway had been in the country but a short time, and 
was employed at the Union House, when the war began. He 
has a good record. 



THREE-YEARS' MEN. 173 



TWENTY-SIXTH REGIMENT. 

The Twenty-sixth Regiment was recruited at Lowell, and left 
Boston Nov. 21, 1861, the winter being spent at Ship Island. 

In July, 1862, it was stationed at New Orleans City, perform- 
ing provost duty, and remained there till June 20, 1863. After- 
wards engaged at different points in the vicinity, and for a long 
time was connected with the Department of the Gulf Served 
also in the Army of the Shenandoah Valley, subsequently at 
Savannah, Ga., where on the 26th of August, 1865, it was mus- 
tered out of service, and Sept. 12 embarked for Boston.- 

The enlistments from Hingham were four in number, as fol- 
lows, viz. : — 

CORPORAL 

CHARLES BOLSTER. 

Enrolled from Hingham, age 21. 

Mustered April 14, 1864, and was corporal in Co. E. Mustered 
out Aug. 26, 1865, by reason of close of the war. 

PRIVATES. 

EDWIN BARR. 

Enrolled from Hingham, age 18. 

Private in Co. E, and was mustered May i, 1864; discharged 
Aug. 26, 1865, by reason of close of the war. 

JOHN O'BRIEN. 

Enrolled from Hingham, age 26. 

Was mustered as private in Co. B, May 7, 1864; discharged 
Aug. 26, 1865, by reason of close of the war. 

NELSON T WOOD. 

Enrolled from Hingham, age 20. 

Private in Co. E, and mustered May i, 1864; mustered out 
Aug. 26, 1865, by reason of close of the war. 



174 HINGHAM IN THE CIVIL WAR. 



TWENTY-EIGHTH REGIMENT. 

This regiment was mustered in the autumn of 1861, and left 
the State Jan. 11, 1862, assigned to the Department of Virginia. 
It was present in nearly all of the most noted engagements which 
there took place, from Second Bull Run to Petersburg, The cas- 
ualties were very large, — the number killed in battle, or dying 
from wounds or disease, being three hundred and sixty-three. 
Of those connected with Hingham, it contained, so far as known, 
a single enlistment, viz. : — 



PRIVATE 

PETER READY. 

1 

Age 25. 

Enlisted from Hingham, and served for the town's quota ; mus- 
tered as private in Co. F, Dec. 20, 1861, and was discharged 
by reason of disability, Feb. 18, 1863. 



THREE-YEARS' MEN. 175 



TWENTY-NINTH REGIMENT. 

The companies composing this regiment were mustered into 
service, and left the State at different dates. Seven of the num- 
ber were formed from among the first enlistments of three years' 
men. They were sent to Fortress Monroe, to fill up the ranks 
of the Third and Fourth Militia Regiments, the latter including 
the Lincoln Light Infantry of Hingham ; and when these 
returned home, the seven companies were designated as the 
First Battalion Massachusetts Volunteers. Three new compa- 
nies were afterwards sent to join it ; and the battalion was then 
regularly organized as the Twenty-ninth Regiment, M. V. I. 

In the subjoined records will be found further interesting par- 
ticulars with regard to this noted and truly excellent regiment. 
The names of five natives of Hingham, and of two of our 
recruits, appear upon its muster-roll, viz. : — 

BRIGADIER-GENERAL 

JOSEPH HENRY BARNES. 

Born in Hingham, July 25, 1833. 

Gen. Barnes raised a company in East Boston, Mass., in April, 
1 86 1. The actual date of his enlistment was May 18, and 
on the 22d he was mustered as captain at Fortress Monroe. 

The company left Massachusetts as an independent organiza- 
tion. Upon arriving at Fortress Monroe, it was for a short time 
attached to the Fourth Massachusetts Regiment of Infantry, as 
Co. K, but subsequently became Co. K of the Massachusetts 
Twenty-ninth. 

On the i6th of July, 1861, Gen. Barnes was assigned to the 
command of all .the three-year companies of Massachusetts vol- 
unteers (seven in number) remaining in the Department of Vir- 
ginia. When the Twenty-ninth, of which these seven compa- 
nies were the nucleus, was formed (Dec. 28, 1861), he was 
commissioned lieutenant-colonel of this regiment, having retained 
command of the battalion during the interval. 



176 HINGHAM IN THE CIVIL WAR. 

Gen. Barnes participated in twenty pitched battles ; having 
fought in Maryland, Virginia, Kentucky, Tennessee, and Missis- 
sippi. He was actively engaged in the three great sieges of 
Richmond (under McCIellan), Vicksburg, and Petersburg ; was 
in the first battle of the war at Big Bethel, and was present with 
his regiment, taking part in the famous encounter between the 
ram " Merrimac " and our vessels in the James River. He was 
also at the taking of Norfolk, at the battles of Gaines' Mill, 
Peach Orchard, Savage Station, and in all of McClellan's "seven 
days' battles ; " commanded his regiment at White Oak Swamp, 
Glendale, Malvern Hill, Second Bull Run, Antietam, Fredericks- 
burg, at Vicksburg, and at Jackson, Miss. ; also at the battles in 
front of Petersburg, as well as in other engagements of lesser 
note. 

In August, 1863, after the Vicksburg campaign, he received 
leave of absence on account of sickness, having served two years 
and tJiree viojiths, ivithoiU being absent a day for any canse what- 
ever. After returning to the army from sick-leave, he served 
on the staff of Gen. Willcox at Cumberland Gap, until Decem- 
ber, 1863, when he rejoined his regiment in Tennessee. 

March 12, 1864, Gen. Bai-nes was placed in command of a 
brigade of the Ninth Corps, and remained in that capacity until 
some time in the month of April. During this period the 
brigade marched from Morristown, East Tennessee, to Knoxville ; 
thence over the mountains, through Kentucky, to Cincinnati. In 
April, 1864, Gen. Barnes arrived in J3oston with his regiment on 
"Veteran Furlough." They subsequently joined the army in 
Virginia under Gen. Grant, and participated in the battles of 
June ist, 2d, and 3d. 

Gen. Barnes commanded a brigade of the Ninth Corps, con- 
sisting of seven regiments, in a severe battle in front of Peters- 
burg, June 17, 1864. He was also in the battle of July 30, the 
noted mine explosion. From July 31 to Sept. 16, 1864, he 
commanded the brigade, although ranking at the time as lieuten- 
ant-colonel. 

For his services at the battle of Blick's Station, Weldon Rail- 
road, Aug. 19, 1864, he was recommended by his corps com- 
mander for appointment as brevet brigadier-general. The rec- 
ommendation begins thus : — 



THREE-YEARS' MEN. 



177 



" VI. Lt.-Col. Jos. H. Barnes, 29th Mass., lately commanding 
brigade, first division. Ninth Army Corps, for distinguished 
gallantry and success in action at Blick's Station, Weldon Rail- 
road, resisting enemy's attack on 9th Corps' right," &c. 

The Twenty-ninth Regiment was attached to the noted Irish 
Brigade for a period of five months, during which it partici- 
pated with the brigade in the battles before Richmond under 
McClellan, and at Antietam and Second Bull Run. Brig.-Gen. 
Thomas Francis Meagher, the commander of the brigade, in a 
letter to Gov. Andrew, published in the annual report of the 
Adjutant-general of Massachusetts, for 1862, says, " Lieut.-Col. 
Joseph H. Barnes is a soldier of the true type, in whom I have 
perfect and imjDlicit reliance. Brave and honorable, he is a credit 
to the State." 

The following recommendations are copied from the original 
documents : — 



Headquarters 30 Brig., ist Div., qth A. C, 
Dec. 10, 1S64. 
Brig.-Gen. L. Thomas, A. G. U. S. A. 

67r, — I have the honor to recommend for appointment in Gen. Hancock's 
new 1st Corps, Jos. H. Barnes, late Lieut-Col. Twenty-ninth Mass. Vols. 
He entered the seivice May 22, 1S61, as captain, was promoted to lieut.- 
col. Dec. 13. 1S61, and was mustered out by expiration of term, Oct. ii, 
1864. 

During his term of service, Lieut-Col. Barnes commanded his regt. 
nearly two-thirds of the time, and commanded a brigade for nearly two 
months in the present campaign. 

I consider him a cool, reliable ofificer, courageous, and of good judgment 
and conduct, both in action, and in camp ; a fine disciplinarian, and capable 
of commanding either a regiment or brigade. 

I am Very Respectfully, 

Your Obedient Servant, 

N. B. McLaughlin, 
Bvt. Brig.-Genl. Vols. Comdg. 3d Brig, ist Div. 9th A. C. 

Hd. Qrs. -^d Bn'g., isi Div., <)fh A. C, December loth, 1864. 
McLaughlin N. B., Bvt. Brig. Gen' I. U. S. V. Comdg. 

Recommends Jos. H. Barnes late Lt.-Col. 29th Mass. Vols, for appoint- 
ment in Genl. Hancock's new ist Corps. Entered the service as Capt., May 
22, 1861, was promoted to Lieut.-Col. Dec. 13, 1861, and mustered out by 
23 



178 HINGHAM IN THE CIVIL WAR. 

expiration of term, Oct. ii, 1864. During his term of service Col. Barnes 
commanded his regiment nearly two-thirds of the time, and commanded a 
brigade nearly two months of the present campaign. 

A True Copy. 

Hd. Qrs. isf Div., gth Corps, Before Petersburg, Va., Dec. 12, 1864. 
It gives me extreme pleasure most heartily to recommend Lt.-Col. Barnes 
for such an ajDpointment. I consider him a man of great coolness and gal- 
lantry, considerable experience as a regimental and brigade commander, and 
every way qualified. 

O. Wi\.i.coy., Brevet MaJ. Gen. 

Hd Qrs. gth Corps, Dec. 1 2, 1 864. 
I heartily indorse the within recommendation. I consider Col. Barnes a 
most excellent soldier, and very efficient commander. He is eminently 
qualified for command. 

Jno. G. Parke, MaJ. Gen. 

LIEUTENANT 

WALDO FLINT CORBETT. 

Born in Hingham, Jan. 4, 1843. 

Enlisted at Charlestown, Mass., Nov. 5, 1861 ; mustered as cor- 
poral in Co. H, Dec. 23, 1861 ; re-enlisted as veteran Jan. i, 
and mustered Jan. 25/1864; promoted second lieutenant of 
First U. S. Heavy Artillery (colored), April 16, 1864, and 
first lieutenant Jan. 25, 1865. 

Lieut. Corbett was in active service during the Peninsular cam- 
paign in the summer of 1862 ; also in the Vicksburg and Jack- 
son campaign, summer of 1863, and at East Tennessee in the 
autumn of that year ; siege of Knoxville, defence of Fort Saun- 
ders, &c. 

He resigned, and his resignation was accepted, to date from 
Jan. I, 1866, at Chattanooga, Tenn. 

SERGEANT 

CALEB HADLEY BEAL. 

Born in Hingham, Jan. 15, 1833. 
For record, see Co. K of the Thirty-fifth regiment, M. V. I. 



THREE-YEARS' MEN. 1 79 

CORPORAL 

JOHN MANIX. 

Age 24. 

Accredited on Hingham quota ; mustered as corporal in Co. I, 
Aug. 24, 1864 ; termination of service July 29, 1865. 

PRIVATES. 

EDWARD CHURCHILL BLOSSOM. 

Born in Hingham, Jan. 30, 1838. 
For record see Co. A, of the Twenty-third Regiment, M. V. L 

ROBERT GRACE. 

Seaman, age 25. 

Accredited on Hingham quota ; mustered in unassigned recruits, 
May 9, 1864. 

GEORGE THOMAS. 

Born in Hingham, Nov. 2, 1841. 

On the i8th of May, 1861, enlisted at Boston as private in the 
" Wightman Rifles," Capt. Thomas W. Clark, and was three 
months at Fortress Monroe. 

After the departure of the Third and Fourth Regiments from 
Fortress Monroe, seven three-years' companies were made the 
basis of the Twenty-ninth Regiment, M. V. I., three years, the 
" Wightman Rifles " being Co. A. 

The record of the Twenty-ninth is characterized by extended 
marches, numerous and trying privations, and a list of engage- 
ments among the most determined and destructive that occurred 
during the war. Private Thomas was present first at the bat- 
tle of Great Bethel, then at Hampton Roads, Gaines' Mill, Sav- 
age Station, White Oak Swamp, Malvern Hill, Antietam, Fred- 
ericksburg, Vicksburg, and Jackson Miss., Blue Springs. E. Tenn., 
Campbell Station, and Siege of Knoxville, Tenn., Cold Harbor, 
Weldon Railroad, and Petersburg. 



l8o HINGHAM IN THE CIVIL WAR. 

On the 30th of July, in the bloody struggle before Petersburg, 
during the charge following the Burnside Mine explosion, he 
was taken prisoner by the enemy, and sent by way of Richmond 
to Danville, Va., where he was confined in the noted "Tobacco 
Warehouse." This building, measuring forty by one hundred 
feet, four stories in height, contained at the time nearly eight 
hundred men. The quantity of food furnished was small, and 
the quality poor ; but, in consideration of services rendered as 
steward, our prisoner was allowed an extra ration of bread and 
meat. In the hands of the enemy, he remained at this place for 
a term of about seven months. 

Returning from Danville to Richmond, he was here confined 
for three days in Libby Prison, and thence released on parole. 
Upon being granted a furlough of thirty-five days, he came to 
Hingham, where the time of absence was extended twenty days 
by his physician. Dr. Ezra Stephenson. 

On the loth of August, 1865, after the close of the war, he 
was mustered out at Readville, Mass., having been in the service 
more than four years. 



THIRTIETH REGIMENT. 

Organized as the Eastern Bay State Regiment, at Camp 
Chase, Lowell. It sailed from Boston Jan. 13, 1862, and arrived 
at Ship Island Feb. 12, having touched at Fortress Monroe on 
the passage out. 

The regiment had an active experience, and was engaged in 
all the principal battles on the Lower Mississippi, including 
Vicksburg, Baton Rouge, Plains Store, Port Hudson, Donald- 
sonville, and also at Winchester, Cedar Creek, and Fisher's Hill, 
in Virginia. Twenty-seven were killed in action, and three 
hundred and forty-four died from wounds or disease. 

So far as known, the number of enlistments from those con- 
nected with Hingham was four, as follows : — 



THREE-YEARS' MEN. l8i 

SERGEANT 

JACOB OURISH, 

Of Hingham, born July 26, 1841. 

Enlisted in Boston, Dec, 18, 1861, on Hingham quota ; mustered 
as private in Co. I, Dec. 28, 1861 ; re-enlisted at New Iberia, 
La., as veteran, Jan. i, 1864 ; promoted sergeant Aug. 7, 1864, 
and July 5, 1866, was mustered out with the regiment at 
Charleston, S.C. 

Sergeant Ourish was present at the siege of forts St. Philip 
and Jackson ; also at the taking of New Orleans, La. He par- 
ticipated in the engagement at Baton Rouge, Aug. 5, 1S62 ; 
Plains Store, May 21, 1863; Siege of Port Hudson, May 25 to 
July 8, 1863 ; Kock's Plantation, La.; Opequan, Va. ; Fisher's 
Hill, Va. ; and Cedar Creek, Va. 

While at New Orleans he was in the hospital with fever 
and ague for nearly a year; and at the battle of Cedar 
Creek, with Gen. Sheridan's forces, was severely wounded in 
the face by a musket-ball, which gave him five additional months 
of hospital experience, the latter being passed at Readville, 
Mass. 

Sergeant Ourish entered the United States service May 18, 
1861 ; and was sent to Fortress Monroe as a volunteer in the 
Lincoln Light Infantry, of Hingham, Co. I (Fourth Regiment). 
He was therefore a member of the first volunteer regiment mus- 
tered into service, as well as of the last volunteer regiment 
mustered out, — a circumstance \yith but few parallels during 
the war. His whole term covers a period of four years and 
nearly nine months. 

CORPORAL 

JOSEPH C. BURR. 

Born in Hingham, Aug. i, 1S27. 

Enlisted at Lowell, Mass , for three years; mustered Oct. 15, 
1 86 1, as corporal in Co. C. 



1 82 HINGHAM IN THE CIVIL WAR. 

The regiment, after being on shipboard in Boston Harbor 
nearly a fortnight, took its departure for Fortress Monroe, Jan. 1 3, 
1862. Soon after arriving there, it was ordered to Ship Island, 
and thence to New Orleans, La. 

Mr. Burr was in the engagement at Baton Rouge, the enemy 
being under the command of Gens. Breckenridge and Van 
Dorn. At the siege of Port Hudson he was continually under 
fire, both day and night, until the surrender. 

Subsequently the Thirtieth was ordered down the river to 
Donaldsonville ; and, in the engagement at this place, the Union 
forces were driven back under cover of the gunboats. Here, 
from constant exposure, Mr. Burr became unfit for duty, and 
was sent to the hospital at Baton Rouge. 

In September, 1863, he received a furlough, and came home. 
Reporting afterwards to Surg.-Gen. Dale, he was transferred to 
the Veteran Reserve Corps ; and Dec. i, 1864, was discharged 
from the Third Regiment, V.R.C., by reason of expiration of 
term of enlistment. 



PRIVATES. 

JOHN BROWN. 

Age 23. 

Farmer ; enlisted from Boston for the quota of Hingham, and 
was mustered as private in Co. E, Nov. 4, 1861 ; date of 
discharge not recorded. 

* WILLIAM J. STOCKWELL. 
Co. I. 

JOHN SULLIVAN. 

Age 27. 

Mustered Oct. 25, i86i,in Co. E ; discharged, Nov. 5, 1863, on 
account of disability. 



THREE-YEARS' MEN. 183 



THIRTY-FIRST REGIMENT. 

The Thirty-first Regiment was mustered into the service of 
the United States during the winter of 1 861-2 ; left Massa- 
chusetts Feb. 21, 1862, and as a regiment was mustered out in 
December, 1864; leaving, however, several companies made up 
of re-enlisted men and recruits, which were all finally mustered 
out Sept. 9, 1865. 

Its Hst of engagements includes Bisland, Port Hudson, Bra- 
shear City, Sabine Cross-Roads, Cane River Crossing, Alexan- 
dria, Gov. Moore's Plantation, Yellow Bayou, and the siege of 
Mobile. 

Of enlistments from Hingham, the Thirty-first Regiment 
contained 

LIEUTENANT 

JOHN G. DAWES. 

Born in Hingham, Mar. 13, 1832. 

Enlisted in Boston for three years ; mustered at Lowell, Mass., 
Feb. 5, 1862, as private in Co. K, and accredited to the quota 
of Hingham ; promoted corporal, and afterwards sergeant. 

Lieut. Dawes was with the Thirty-first at New Orleans, La., 
when that city surrendered to the Union forces. He after- 
wards rendered efficient service upon garrison and outpost duty. 

Oct. 3, 1862, he was transferred to the Second Louisiana Vol- 
unteers, colored, and promoted second lieutenant ; was present 
at the battle of Port Hudson, &c. After serving under the last 
promotion about fifteen months, he resigned his position and 
came home. 

Lieut. Dawes died in Hingham of consumption, Nov. 4, 1870, 
aged 38 years, 7 months, 2 1 days. He was a son of John P. 
and Juliet (Lincoln) Dawes. 



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CHAPTER X. 
THIRTY-SECOND REGIMENT. 

Organization — Recruiting b\' Capt. Stephenson at Camp Dimmick, Hingham — Thirty- 
one men from Camp Cameron — Mustering Company — Leave for Fort Warren — 
Recruiting by Lieut. Lyman B. Whiton, at Oasis Hall — Recruits leave Hingham for 
Camp Cameron — Consolidation with Co. E — Co. F — Number of Hingham Enlist- 
ments in the Thirty-second Regiment — List of Battles — Number of Killed and Wounded 
— Sketch of the Battle of Laurel Hill. 

SIX companies M. V. M., organized for garrison duty at Fort 
Warren, constituted tlie basis of tlie Thirty-second Regiment. 
Capts. Luther Steplienson, jun.,of Hingliam, and Cephas C. Bum- 
pus of Braintree, had previously been connected with the Fourth 
Regiment, M. V. M., and were tliree months at Fortress Monroe, 
commanding companies I and C. Many of the enlistments 
were also from those who had already been in the service, and 
the battalion was regarded as one of the most efficient organiza- 
tions in the State. 

These several commands were not, however, recognized as a 
regiment until May 25, 1862, when by telegraph despatch they 
were ordered to report at the seat of war at the earliest possible 
moment. In twelve hours from the time the despatch was 
received, they were on their way for Washington. Shortly after, 
the requisite number of companies was forwarded to join the 
battalion, and the ranks were filled. 

In November, 1861, Capt. Luther Stephenson, jun., entered 
upon the work of recruiting a company, to be stationed at Fort 
Warren, for the purpose before stated, and established his head- 
quarters at the Town Hall, Hingham, designating the locality as 
" Camp Dimmick," in honor of Col. Dimmick, then in command 
at Fort Warren. In the prosecution of his labors, he had the 
hearty sympathy and co-operation of his fellow townsmen, who 
in various forms testified their interest, not only by acceptable 



THIRTY-SECOND REGIMENT. 1 85 

contributions for the happiness and comfort of those in camp, 
but by rendering every-other service in their power. 

Enlistments came in rapidly, many from various towns in 
different sections of the State, as well as from among the citizens 
of Hingham ; and shortly, by the accession of thirty-one men 
from Camp Cameron, including Lieut. Charles A. Dearborn of 
Salem, the requisite number was secured. Of natives or resi- 
dents of Hingham, Co. A contained twenty-four. 

On Monday, Nov. 26, 1861, all were mustered into the service 
of the United States ; and on Tuesday, Nov. 27, left camp for 
Fort Warren, where the winter of 186 1-2 was passed. 

Immediately on the departure of Co. A, Lieut. Lyman B. 
Whiton opened a recruiting-office at Oasis Hall, for the purpose 
of obtaining enlistments, to be joined to a company then being 
rafsed by Capt. Bumpus of Braintree. < His enterprise was soon 
crowned with abundant success. More than fifty men were 
enrolled, nearly forty of whom were from the town of Hingham. 
A portion of these, however, were not mustered in, on account 
of excess of numbers, thirty-two being finally accepted. On 
Monday, Dec. 13, the recruits left Hingham for Camp Cameron, 
where they were consolidated with Co. E, Capt. Bumpus, and 
where they remained until Tuesday, Dec. 24, when all left for 
Fort Warren. 

Co. F, gathered from different localities and by different 
recruiting agents, contained twenty-two men from Hingham ; 
and there were six enlistments of this class in other companies, 
swelling the total of natives or residents of the town who were 
connected with this regiment to eighty-four. 

In January, 1864, three hundred and thirty men of this regi- 
ment, having re-enlisted, were permitted to go to their homes in 
Massachusetts for thirty days. They arrived in Boston on Sun- 
day, and received a most cordial welcome from Gov. Andrew, the 
mayor, and other officials. A salute was fired on Boston Com- 
mon in honor of their arrival, and a collation provided at Fa- 
neuil Hall. The men from Hingham were' sent home in carriages 
free of expense. Their visit here was -made pleasant by a grand 
reception ball, as well as by other provisions for their gratifica- 
tion. 

24 



1 86 ff INGHAM IN THE CIVIL WAR. 

The list of battles of the Thirty-second is as follows, viz. : 
Malvern Hill, Gaines' Mill, Second Bull Run, Antietam, Shepards- 
town Ford, Fredericksburg, Chancellorsville, Gettysburg, Rappa- 
hannock Station, Mine Run, Wilderness, Laurel Hill, Spottsyl- 
vania, North Anna, Tolopotomy Swamp, Bethesda Church, 
Cold Harbor, Petersburg, Weldon Railroad, Vaughan Road, 
Dabney's Mills, Boydton Road, and White Oak Road. 

The total number of killed and wounded, and of those who 
died from disease, was two hundred and seventy-seven. The 
regiment was mustered out June 29, 1865. 

Gen. Luther Stephenson, jun., who at the time was lieuten- 
ant-colonel commanding the Thirty-second Regiment, has pre- 
pared for these pages the following vivid sketch of the battle of 
Laurel Hill. It will be read with peculiar interest by those who 
escaped the dangers of the day, and it will not fail to enlist the 
hearty attention of the general public. 

THE BATTLE OF LAUREL HILL, VA. 

The 1 2th of May, 1864, will long be remembered by the 
soldiers of the Thirty-second Massachusetts Regiment as a 
marked day in its history, because of the severe and disastrous 
battle in which it participated, which for severity of losses, when 
the numbers engaged, and the short, sharp conflict, are taken 
into consideration, can hardly be exceeded by the reports from 
any other regiment that was engaged during the war of the 
rebellion. 

The regiment had met with severe losses and hard fighting in 
other battles, particularly at Fredericksburg and Gettysburg ; but 
the number of killed and wounded, in proportion to the number 
engaged, at these places, fell far short of the casualties in the 
conflict known in the history of the regiment, and inscribed upon 
its battle-flag, as the " Battle of Laurel Hill." 

In furnishing an account of this battle, I am compelled to 
relate my own personal experience on that day, and may be par- 
doned for the constant use of the personal pronoun, for the 
reason that I can better illustrate the action of the regiment by 
relating my own experience and action. 

The regiment had crossed the Rapidan with the- Army of the 



THIRTV-SECOND REGIMENT. 1 8/ 

Potomac under Gen. Grant, had been engaged with the enemy on 
the days of the 5th, 6th, and 7th of May, in the Wilderness, and, 
on the night of the 7th, marched to the left, arriving in the vicinity 
of a point known as Laurel Hill, which is near Spottsylvania, 
on the morning of the 8th, during which day we remained in 
position, supporting the Fifth Massachusetts Battery. On the 
morning of the 9th, we took our position near Laurel Hill, 
occupying some low earthworks which had been thrown up the 
day previous by troops who had taken the advance in the skir- 
mishing when the van of the two armies came together, and 
Gen. Grant ascertained that his attempt to flank his skilful 
antagonist had been unsuccessful. 

The appearance of the country in this locality is very similar 
to what may be seen in most parts of Virginia, — a succession 
of hills and valleys, admirably adapted for defence. Our posi- 
tion was in a valley near the foot of a hill, on which was stationed 
the Union picket-line ; beyond, another eminence where the 
enemy's pickets were located ; and still farther, Laurel Hill, occu- 
pied by a portion of the army under the command of Gen. Lee 
(this last locality being probably a distance of about one-fourth 
of a mile from our position). On the field between the two 
picket-Hnes, a skirmish had taken place on the 8th of May ; and 
the dead bodies of our soldiers remained upon the ground, 
unburied, it being impossible to reach them in safety in the face 
of the enemy. 

From the time we took this position, until the 12th, we remained 
inactive, with exception of duties upon the picket-line. Our 
situation, however, was unpleasant in the extreme, forced as we 
were to maintain a reclining position on account of the watch- 
fulness of the enemy's sharpshooters, who made a target of 
every one who was reckless enough to stand erect. In addition 
to this annoyance, the weather was a succession of sunshine and 
showers, burning with heat, and then drenching us with rain. 
This operated fearfully upon the dead bodies of the slain left 
upon the field, filling the air with a stench disgusting and almost 
suffocating. 

On the morning of the 12th, Gen. Griffin, commander of the 
first division. Fifth Corps, sent for me, and gave me orders to 



1 88 H INGHAM IN THE CIVIL WAR. 

take command of the division picket detail, and advance it as a 
line of skirmishers upon the Confederate works, informing me 
that he should send after me, at once, the second brigade, con- 
sisting of the Sixty-second Pennsylvania and the Ninth and 
Thirty-second Massachusetts Regiments, for an assault upon the 
enemy's line directly in our front. 

I proceeded at once to perform the duty required of me, 
and on arriving at the front found the picket-line (which con- 
sisted of details from a number of regiments belonging to the 
division), stationed in rifle-pits dug into the brow of the hill, a 
number of feet apart, three men occupying each pit. 

This line was so extended, that some considerable time was 
consumed in communicating my orders to the officers in com- 
mand of the several regimental details, which were, that at 
a given signal they should move forward at once from their 
position, deploying as they advanced. The preparations, how- 
ever, for the advance of the main column had startled the enemy, 
who commenced a heavy fire of artillery, which swept the top of 
the hill where my line was stationed. This fire was so fierce, 
that the officers could not force their men forward as I desired. 
A few started, only to be shot, or to fall back again. In vain I 
expostulated, entreated, threatened. The men were so widely 
separated that it was impossible to control them. A few of the 
bravest would start forward, but would be compelled to return 
for want of support. 

I recollect the action of the officer in command of the 
Ninety-first Pennsylvania detail, who, upon my threats of a 
court-martial for cowardice, sprang up, and, waving his sword, 
shouted to his men to come on ; but unfortunately, a fresh volley 
of canister and shell came tearing over the hill, and he dropped 
into his hole again, from which no threats could remove him. 

While striving to push my men forward, I looked back, and 
saw the assaulting columns, under the command of Col. Prescott, 
advancing in good order. It came over my picket-line, down the 
hill to the next, then forward to the foot of the next, when the 
men faltered under the terrible fire they encountered, and lay 
down within a short distance of the enemy's lines. 

Looking over the brow of the hill, I saw with dismay that my 



THIRTY-SECOND REGIMENT. 1 89 

own regiment was exposed to a terrible fire, not only in its front, 
but also to a cross-fire on its left flank, which must soon cut it 
to pieces ; and yet no effort was being made to relieve the brave 
men from their exposed position. With a thought only of the 
safety of the regiment, I started at once to join it. I can hardly 
find words to describe the fearful gauntlet I ran while making 
my way to the regiment. Exposed to. the fire of the rebel line, 
the whizzing bullets, shot tearing up the ground all ar'ound me, 
shells bursting over my head, it seems a miracle that I reached 
my destination in safety, which, thank God, I did, after showing 
a rate of speed that would have astonished my friends at home, 
and suffering no injury excepting a rent in my coat made by a 
piece of shell. * 

Proceeding directly to the left, I inquired why they did not go 
forward, or at least do something to protect themselves from 

almost certain death. I recollect that Capt. answered that 

they were being cut to pieces without a chance of defending 
themselves. Directing the men to draw their bodies along on 
the ground, and get more under the protection of the hill, I 
turned, and saw that the regiments on the right had broken, and 
were falling back thoroughly disorganized ; and there was nothing 
left for the Thirty-second to do but to retreat. Calling upon the 
men to fall back and save themselves if possible, we started on 
our retreat, which was far more disastrous than the advance. 

The rebels poured upon us an incessant fire of shot and shell, 
reaping down our noble soldiers like grass before the scythe 
men falling at almost every step, killed or wounded. In the 
Thirty-second, five color-bearers fell before the colors reached 
our old position behind the works. Once, looking back, I saw 
our flag had been left upon the field, and Col. Prescott and my- 
self turned to bring it off at all hazards, when another brave 
soldier took it only to fall in his turn. And here, I might add, 
that the rain commenced falling in torrents, while Heaven's 
artillery united with the cannon of the opposing armies, only to 
make the scene more fearful and terrific. I think no words 
can give so accurate an idea of the terrible fire to which we 
were subjected, as the statement that the Thirty-second took 
into that fight about one hundred and ninety men (a portion of 



I go HINGHAM IN THE CIVIL WAR. 

the regiment being on picket-duty) ; and of this number one 
hundred and three were killed and wounded, all in the short 
space of less than thirty mimttes. 

Of the Hindiam soldiers, we lost some of our best and bravest ; 
Lieut. Geo. M. Hudson, being severely, and Washington I Stod- 
der, Jacob G. Gushing, and Gardner Jones mortally wounded. 
Late in the afternoon I rode to the hospital of the first division, 
which was located some distance at the rear. The men who 
were wounded, and able to walk, were being sent forward to 
make their way to Fredericksburg ; while those severely wounded 
were loaded into the heavy baggage wagons, lying upon a 
few pine boughs. When we consider that these poor men 
were transported in these vehicles, without springs to relieve 
the motion, to Fredericksburg, a distance of nearly fourteen 
miles, a considerable portion of which was over a corduroy road, 
made of logs, we can imagine the anguish and pain they endured 
during their fearful ride. Entering the hospital tents, I found 
six officers of my own regiment wounded, lying side by 
side : two of them, alas ! I never saw again. On every side I 
found men of the Thirty-second. Washington L Stodder had 
just breathed his last. I stopped to speak to Corp. Jacob G. 
Gushing, who, although seemingly dying, recognized me, calling 
me by name. My visit, however, was cut short by a message 
from the regiment, informing me that we had received orders to 
move ; and, on hastening back, I found that we were to march at 
nightfall. 

Silently we moved away from this place, leaving our dead and 
many wounded on the field to the tender mercies of strangers, 
and perhaps foes, and carrying with us, bitter, sad, recollections 
of the day and the locality. Our march was to Spottsylvania ; 
there again to fight, only to move forward again, and again to 
fight, and so to continue until we had finished that terrible cam- 
paign, which might have been traced by a line of blood, extend- 
ing from the Rapidan to the James. 



THIRTY-SECOND REGIMENT. 



191 



GEN. LUTHER STEPHENSON, Jun. 

Luther Stephenson, jun., was born in Hingham, April 25, 
1830. At the commencement of the rebellion he held the 
position of first lieutenant in Co. I, Fourth Massachusetts Vol- 
unteer Militia. On the i/'th of April, 1861, he received a 
telegram from the governor of the State ordering him to report 
with the company, by first conveyance, at Boston. 

The order was received early in the forenoon, and at 5 o'clock, 
P.M., the company left Hingham. On arriving in Boston, it imme- 
diately joined the Fourth Regiment. Marching from the State 
House to the Old Colony Depot, the regiment took the train for 
Fall River, whence the steamer " State of Maine " transported 
it to Fortress Monroe, Va. 

Lieut, Stephenson was elected captain of Co. I on the i8th, 
and on the 22d was mustered into the service of the United 
States at Fortress Monroe, Va. 

He served with the regiment three months, returned home, 
and was mustered out on the 22d of July, 1861. Not content 
with this short term of service at the commencement of the 
country's perils, he immediately recruited the first Co. (A), of 
the Thirty-second Regiment Massachusetts Volunteers, and was 
again mustered into the United States service, Nov. 28, 1861, 
for three years, at Fort Warren, Boston Harbor, with the rank 
of captain. The regiment remained at the fort till May 25 
1862, when it was ordered to Washington, and joined the Army 
of the Potomac at Harrison's Landing, Va., in June, 1862. With 
the rank of captain, he was in command of the regiment during 
the campaign under Gen. John Pope, which included the battle 
of Second Bull Run. 

He was promoted to the rank of major, Aug. 18, 1862, and 
was present and took part in the battles of Antietam, Shepards- 
town Ford, and Fredericksburg. 

Before the close of the year, Dec. 29, he was promoted lieu- 
tenant-colonel, and commanded the regiment at the battle of 
Chancellorsville. 



192 HINGHAM IN THE CIVIL WAR. 

At the battle of Gettysburg, July 2, 1863, he was severely 
wounded in the face by a rifle-ball. While thus disabled, he 
returned to his home in Hingham ; and on recovering rejoined 
the regiment, Nov. 3, 1863, in time to participate in the battles 
at Rappahannock Station and Mine Run, Va. 

He was with his regiment during the campaign under Gen. 
U. S. Grant, from May 5 till June 28, 1864, and took part in the 
battles of the Wilderness, Laurel Hill, Spottsylvania, North 
Anna, Tolopotomy Swamp, Bethesda Church, Cold Harbor, and 
Petersburg. He received slight wounds in the engagements of 
June 18 and 22, and on the 28th was discharged for disability 
caused by the wound received at Gettysburg. 

By order of Gen. Grant, Lieut. -Col. Stephenson was brevetted 
colonel and brigadier-general, March 15, 1^6^, ior " gallant a7id 
inentorious services in the campaigns against Richmond, Va." 



MAJORS. 

EDWARD TRACY BOUVE. 

For record, see Fourth Massachusetts Cavalry. 

LYMAN BARNES WHITON. 
For record, see Third Massachusetts Heavy Artillery. 

CAPTAIN 

GEORGE REUBEN REED. 

Born in Hingham, Dec. 17, 1839. 

Member of Co. I, of the Fourth Regiment. M. V. I., Lincoln 
Light Infantry, left Hingham with the first detachment, April 
17, 1 86 1, and was three months stationed at Fortress Monroe. 
Oct. 31, 1 861, enlisted at Camp Dimmick in Co. A. 

Sept. I, 1862, he was promoted from sergeant to second lieu- 
tenant ; Dec. 30, 1862, to first lieutenant; and July 20, 1864, 
was commissioned captain. 



THIRTY-SECOND REGIMENT. 



193 



With the Thirty-second, in the Army of the Potomac, he bore 
a full part in all its marches, privations, and dangers, up to the 
month of August, 1864. Beginning at Malvern Hill, July 3, 
1862, he was in the battle of Gaines' Mill, Second Bull Run,Chan- 
tilly, Antietam, Fredericksburg, Chancellorsville, Gettysburg, 
Rappahannock Station, Mine Run, Wilderness, Spottsylvania, 
North Anna, Tolopotomy, Bethesda Church, and Petersburg. 

At Laurel Hill, Capt. Reed was in command of Co. I, Charles- 
town, consisting of forty-one men. In a charge on the enemy, 
covering scarcely more than fifteen minutes' time, twenty-five of 
these were killed or wounded. 

At the battle of North Anna, while engao'ed on the skirmish- 
line, he was for a short time a prisoner in the hands of the 
enemy, but, in the excitement and confusion of battle, fortunately 
succeeded in effecting his escape. 

On the 3d of August, 1864, he was detailed as quarter- 
master at the Fifth Corps Hospital, City Point, Va., and contin- 
ued at this post till the 25th of the following November, when 
he was mustered out at Petersburg by reason of the expiration 
of his term of enlistment. 

In all the trying experience of the Thirty-second, Capt. Reed 
proved himself a good officer and true soldier. 

LIEUTENANTS. 

* GEORGE W. BIBBY. 
Co. A. 

* NATHANIEL FRENCH, Jun. 
Co. A. 

AMOS P. HOLDEN. 

Age 38. 

First enrolled from Hingham, subsequently from the town of 
Westminster. Was sergeant in Co. A at the time of enlist- 
ment, Oct. 31, 1 86 1 ; promoted second lieutenant March 26, 
1862. 



1^4 HINGHAM IN THE CIVIL WAR. 

GEORGE MARTIN HUDSON. 

Born in Hingham, March 29, 1829. 

Enlisted Feb. 15, 1862; mustered Feb. 17, at Fort Warren, Bos- 
ton Harbor, as private in Co. F, First Battalion, M. V. I., after- 
wards Thirty-second Regiment ; appointed second sergeant 
March i, first sergeant, Nov. 15, second lieutenant, Dec. 29, 
1862, and First Lieutenant, Sept. 29, 1863. 

Lieut. Hudson was in the battles of Antietam, Fredericksburg, 
Chancellorsville, Gettysburg, Bristoe's Station, Mine Run, the 
battles of the Wilderness, and Laurel Hill. 

Severely wounded in both legs by a Minnie ball while bravely 
leading his men in a charge on the enemy's batteries at the battle 
of Laurel Hill, May 12, 1864, he was carried to Douglas Hos- 
pital, Washington, D.C., and, as soon as he was able to be 
removed, was brought to his home in Hingham. 

He was mustered out at Boston, Feb. 18, 1865, by reason of 
expiration of terra of service. 

SERGEANTS. 

THOMAS DAVIS BLOSSOM. 

Born at Chicopee, Mass., April 29, 1842. 

A resident of Hingham, he enlisted for the quota of the town as 
private, Jan. 21, 1862, at Fort Warren, Boston Harbor, Mass., 
and the same day was mustered into Co. E. 

Nov. 28, 1864, promoted corporal; afterwards, March i, 1865, 
sergeant; and again, April 25, 1865, orderly-sergeant. 

He was discharged at Rappahannock Station, Va., for re- 
enlistment, and Jan. 4, 1864, enrolled to serve three years. 

He shared in the engagement at Fredericksburg, Va., in 
December, 1862, and was in the battles at Antietam, Mine 
Run, and Petersburg, as well as in other engagements in which 
the Thirty-second took part. 

Wounded at Petersburg, June 18, 1864, he was first sent to 



THIRTY-SECOND REGIMENT. Iq5 

the corps hospital ; thence transferred to David's Island, and 
afterwards removed to Readville, Mass. Remaining here two or 
three weeks, he again joined his regiment for active duty ; and 
on the 29th of June, 1865, after the close of the war, he was 
mustered out, having been in the service three years and six 
months. 

LEONARD EDSON BUKER. 

Born in Braintree, Mass., Dec. 9, 1836. 

Resident of Hingham ; enlisted at Boston, Feb. 15, 1S62, and 
Feb. 19 was mustered as private in Co. F ; promoted corporal 
March i, 1863 ; and Nov. i, 1863, promoted sergeant ; Jan, 4, 
1864, re-enlisted as veteran for three years. 

Serg. Buker was present in the battles of Second Bull Run 
Antietam, Fredericksburg, Chancellorsville, Gettysburg, Rappa- 
hannock Station, Mine Run, Wilderness, Laurel Hill, Spott- 
sylvania. North Anna, Petersburg, Weldon Railroad, Gravelly 
Run, and, with the exception of Five Forks, all other engage- 
ments and skirmishes set down to the Thirty-second Regi- 
ment. 

At the battle of Gravelly Run he was wounded ; and for two 
months was in the Army Square Hospital at Washington, 
D.C. Mustered out June 29, 1865, by reason of close of the 
war. 

Serg. Buker's term of service included three years and four 
months. He was a faithful officer and soldier, and has an 
honorable record. 

THOMAS ALONZO CARVER. 

Born in Boston, May 20, 1832. 

Enlisted at Hingham, Dec. 2, 1861, and was mustered as private 
in Co. E, Dec. 16, 1861 ; promoted sergeant Jan. i, 1863 ; 
transferred to V. R. C. March 7, 1 864. 

Serg. Carver was in the engagements at Fredericksburg, 
Chancellorsville, and, lastly, at Gettysburg, where he was 
wounded in the arm, which occasioned a confinement of four 



196 HINGHAM IN THE CIVIL WAR. 

months in the McClellan Hospital at Philadelphia, Pa. He was 
also four weeks at the hospital at Windmill Point from sickness. 
Mustered out at Washington, D.C., Dec. 16, 1864, by reason of 
expiration of term of servdce. 

CHARLES CORBETT. 

Enrolled from Hingham, age 37. 

Mustered Nov. 10, 1861, as sergeant in Co. A ; was at Fort 
Warren in the winter of 1861-2, and shared in the general 
experience of the regiment in the Department of Virginia, 
until after the battle of Fredericksburg, when, taken sick and 
disabled, he was honorably discharged at Stoneman Station, 
Va., March 22, 1863. 

Serg. Corbett was also one of the thirty-seven volunteers who 
left Hingham May 18, 1861, to join the Lincoln Light Lifantry 
at Fortress Monroe. 

JOHN WESLEY ELDREDGE. 

Born in Hingham, June 3, 1843. 

Was a volunteer in the Lincoln Light Infantry, and left Hing- 
ham with the company, April 17, 1861, serving three months 
at Fortress Monroe, Dec. 2, 1861, enlisted, and was mus- 
tered as private in Co. E of the Thirty-second Regiment. Mus- 
tered out for re-enlistment at Liberty, Va., Jan. 4, 1864. 
Promoted corporal, Dec. 4, 1863 ; and May 3, 1864, promoted 
sergeant. 

From the battle at Malvern Hill to the surrender of Gen. 
Lee, sixteen of the engagements credited to the Thirty-second 
Regiment are included in the record of Serg. Eldredge. 

At Laurel Hill he was wounded in the hand, and for a time 
was in the hospital at West Philadelphia. Mustered out at the 
end of the war, after a faithful service of nearly four years. 

HENRY STURGES EWER. 

Born in Hingham, Jan. 11, 1833. 
Was a regular member of the Lincoln Light Infantry at the 



THIRTYrSECOND REGIMENT. 



197 



outbreak of the war ; and, leaving with the first detachment of 
the company, was three months at Fortress Monroe. 

Enlisted Nov. i, 1861, sergeant in Co. A, and was with the 
regiment at Fort Warren in the winter of 186 1-2. In the 
Department of Virginia, he was present in the battles at Malvern 
Hill and Antietam ; but, being disabled by sickness, he was hon- 
orably discharged near Falmouth, Va., March 22, 1863, having 
been in the service nearly sixteen months. 

* JAMES MADISON HASKELL. 
Co. A. 

JAMES Mccarty. 

Age 33. 

Enlisted from Hingham, for the quota of the town Nov. 10, 1861, 
as private in Co. A ; promoted corporal, afterwards sergeant. 
Mustered out for re-enlistment Jan. 5, 1864, and discharged 
June 29, 1865, by reason of expiration of term of enlistment or 
close of the war. 

An incident from the record of Serg. McCarty will show at 
once his bravery and patriotism. At the battle of Laurel Hill, 
May 12, 1864, he was corporal in the color-guard. On the 
retreat which took place after the charge, he bore the national 
standard, — Stars and Stripes, — while a comrade carried the 
regimental flag of the State of Old Massachusetts. Missing his 
companion, he turned and saw that he had fallen. Planting his 
staff erect in the ground, he ran back, took the standard from 
beside the dying, soldier, and retaking his own, brought both off 
safely together. 

* CHARLES S. MEAD. 
Co. A. 

* PETER OURISH. 
Co. E. 



198 



HINGHAM IN THE CIVIL WAR. 



JOHN PARRY. 

Age 25. 

Enrolled from Weymouth, as corporal in Co. A ; afterwards from 
the town of Hingham, as sergeant in the same company. 
Mustered Nov. i, i85i. Discharged for re-enlistment Feb. 6, 
1864. Mustered out June 29, 1865, by reason of close of the 
war. 

Serg. Parry was in nearly all of the battles in which the regi- 
ment took part. 

/- 

ISAAC G. WATERS. 

Age 20. 

Sergeant in Co. F. Enlisted from Hingham for the quota of the 
town, and was mustered Feb. 19, 1S62. 

Was in all the battles up to Gettysburg. Transferred to 
Veteran Reserve Corps, Sept. 16, 1863. After this was assigned 
for special duty. 

Serg. Waters was connected with the Lincoln Light Infantry, 
and as a volunteer left with the company on the afternoon of 
April 17, 1 86 1, and served three months at Fortress Monroe. 

NATHANIEL WILDER, 2d. 

Born in Hingham, Feb. 23, 1840, 

Enlisted at Hingham, Dec, 2, 1861, as private in Co. E, and 
Jan. I, 1863, promoted sergeant; re-enlisted Jan. 4, 1864, at 
Liberty, Va. ; transferred to V. R. C, March 20, 1865. 

Serg. Wilder was in the engagements at Second Bull Run, 
Antietam, Shepardstown Ford, Fredericksburg, Chancellorsville, 
Gettysburg, Rappahannock Station, and Mine Run. 

While returning from the furlough granted on re-enlistment, he 
was accidentally disabled at Baltimore, and was sent to camp 
hospital at Liberty, Va., where he remained till the opening of 
the Wilderness campaign, when he rejoined the regiment. 

At Peebles Farm he suffered from sickness, and for a brief 



THIRTY-SECOND REGIMENT. 



199 



period was in division hospital. After joining the regiment, he 

was a^ain disabled, and sent to Lincoln Hospital, Washington, 

D.C., from which he was transferred to V. R. C, as before stated. 

He was mustered out at Washington, D.C., Aug. 23, 1865. 

CORPORALS. 

JOHN CALVIN CHADBOURN. 

Born !n Effingham, N.H., July 8, 1838. 

A member of Co. A ; enlisted as private at Hingham, Nov. 25, 
1 86 1, and the same day was mustered into service ; re-enlisted 
at Liberty, Va., Jan. 4, 1864; promoted corporal Dec. 4, 1864. 

Corp, Chadbourn was in the employ of Mr. Erastus Whiton at 
the time of enlistment, and joined the Army of the Potomac 
at Harrison's Landing, July 3, 1862. With the exception of the 
surrender of Gen. Lee, and such of the engagements as occurred 
during his confinement in the hospital, he was in all the princi- 
pal battles which took place in the Department of Virginia. 

In the engagement at Cold Harbor he was wounded through 
the hips by a musket-ball, and afterwards conveyed to the hos- 
pital at York, Pa., where he remained until his recovery, a period 
of nine weeks. He was also at one time disabled by sickness, 
and came to Readville, Mass., where, after a stay of three 
months, he regained his health, and returned to active duty at 
the front. 

His whole term of service included three years and six 
months ; mustered out by order of War Department, June 10, 
1865, 

SILAS HENRY COBB. 

Born in Hingham, April 2, 1S31. 

Was corporal in Co. E ; enlisted Dec. 2, 1861. Soon after leav- 
ing the Peninsula, Corp. Cobb was taken sick and removed 
to the hospital ; discharged- for disability, Dec. 23, 
1862. 

Mr. Cobb was one of the thirty-seven volunteers who went 



20O H INCH AM IN THE CIVIL WAR. 

from Hingham May i8, 1861, to join the Lincoln Light Infan- 
try, then stationed at Fortress Monroe. 

* JACOB GILKEY GUSHING. 
Co. D. 

THEOPHILUS GUSHING, Jun. 
Born in Hingham, age 22. 

Mustered Feb. 20, 1862; was corporal in Co. F; mustered out 
for disability, Jan. 23, 1863. 

WILLIAM LORENZO DAWES. 

Born in Hingham, April 10, 1842. 

Enlisted from Hingham for the quota of the town, as private in 
Co. F, Feb. 3, 1862, and was mustered in Feb. 13 ; re-enlisted 
as veteran, Jan. 5, 1864; promoted corporal Co. F. After a 
faithful service of three years and four months, was finally 
mustered out June 29, 1865, by reason of the close of the war. 

Corp. Dawes shared the fortunes of his regiment from first to 
last, being present in nearly all the engagements and skirmishes 
from Cold Harbor to Five Forks, leaving an honorable record. 
At the battle of Cold Harbor he was slightly wounded. 

JOHN C. ELDREDGE. 

Enrolled from Hingham, age 43. 

Mustered Dec. 2, 1861, and was corporal in Co. E ; service ter- 
minated Nov. 14, 1862, at which time he was mustered out for 
. disability. 

THOMAS L. FRENCH. 

Age 31. 

Was corporal in Co. F; enlisted from Hingham, Feb. 2, 1862, 
and Jan. 4, 1864, was mustered out for re-enlistment. 

In the summer of 1863, Corp. French was confined by sick- 



THIRTY-SECOND REGIMENT. 20I 

ness at Convalescent Camp, near Alexandria, and for a time was 
detailed for hospital duty. Mustered out June 29, 1865, by rea- 
son of close of the war, having been in service three years and 
nearly five months. 

HARVEY MANN PRATT. 

Born in Cohasset, June 7, 1836. 

Enlisted at Hingham, as private in Co. A ; re-enlisted Jan. 4, 
1864; promoted corporal, May 25, 1865. 

Corp. Pratt was in the battle at Second Bull Run, Fredericks- 
burg, Chancellorsville, Gettysburg, Mine Run, Wilderness, and 
lastly at Cold Harbor in June, 1864, where, being wounded, he 
was sent to the United States Hospital at York, Pa., in which 
he was confined ten months. 

Rejoining the regiment in the spring of 1865, he was mustered 
out at Gallop's Island, Boston Harbor, on the 29th of the June 
following. His whole term of service included three years and 
nearly eight months. 

At the time of re-enlisting in January, 1864, Corp. Pratt 
availed himself of the privilege of coming home on a furlough. 
During his absence, however, his family had removed from 
Hingham to the town of South Scituate. But as he was 
counted on the quota of Hingham when he re-enlisted, he still 
claimed residence here, and accepted from our recruiting com- 
mittee the bounty which was divided among the soldiers. Sub- 
sequently learning that the town of South Scituate could 
rightfully claim him on her quota, though bound by no legal 
obligation, the bounty money received from the town's commit- 
tee was promptly and honorably restored. 

Corp. Pratt was son-in-law of the late Nathaniel French, sen. 

EDGAR P. STODDER. 

Age 32. 

Born in Hingham, and enlisted for the quota of the town, Dec. 2, 
1861 ; mustered as private in Co. E ; promoted corporal ; mus- 
tered out for re-enlistment Jan. 4, 1864, and, according to the 
26 



202 HINGHAM IN THE CIVIL WAR. 

report of the adjutant-general, discharged July ii, 1865, by 
reason of disability. 

Corp. Stodder was in the service three years and seven 
months, and includes in his list the most noted engagements set 
down to the Thirty-second Regiment. He has a good record. 

* WASHINGTON IRVING STODDER. 

Co. F. 

SUMNER A. TRASK. 

Born in Boston, Feb. i, 1835. A resident of Hingham. 

Enlisted under Capt. Stephenson, at Camp Dimmick, Nov. i, 
1 86 1, as private in Co A ; promoted corporal at Sharpsburg, 
September, 1862 ; was at Fort Warren until the defeat of Gen. 
Banks, when the regiment was sent to Harrison's Landing. 

Corp. Trask participated in the battles of Fredericksburg a*nd 
Antietam ; but soon after was taken sick with chronic diarrhoea, 
and April 27, 1863, was discharged on account of disability. 

MUSICIANS. 

EDWIN HERSEY. 

Born in Hingham, March 14, 1842. 

Enlisted on the quota of this town, and was mustered into ser- 
vice Dec. 2, 1 861, as private in Co, E ; discharged at Liberty, 
Va., Jan. 4. 1864, to re-enlist as veteran ; final muster-out 
June 29, 1865, near Washington, D.C., by reason of special 
order No. 158, A. of P. 

Mr. Hersey participated in the following battles, viz. : Mal- 
vern Hill, Va. ; Second Bull Run ; Antietam, Md. ; Blackburn's 
Ford, Md. ; Fredericksburg, Va ; Chancellorsville, Va ; Aldie, 
Va. ; Gettysburg, Pa. ; Bristoe's Station, Va. ; Rappahannock 
Station, Va. ; New Hope Church, Va. ; and Mine Run, Va. 

He was one of those who re-enlisted in January, 1864, 
for a second term of three vears. The heartv welcome ex- 



THIRTY-SECOND REGIMENT. 



203 



tended to these veterans as they returned to their homes to 
enjoy the conditional furlough of thirty days, has been already 
noticed. . Mr. Hersey refers to these receptions as among the 
most pleasant memories of his soldier-life. 

After rejoining the army, he was detailed as musician, and 
performed the service required until May, 1864. He was then 
assigned to hospital duty under Surg. William L. Faxon of the 
Fifth Corps Hospital ; subsequently was appointed hospital 
nurse ; afterwards, ward-master, and finally to the trying and 
responsible position of division dresser. In the latter situation 
he was called to the care of nearly one hundred per day of the 
most seriously wounded, — a service requiring skill and good 
judgment, as well as firmness of nerve. 

In May, 1865, the war being over, and most of the wounded 
sent North, he returned to his regiment, which in July was 
ordered to Gallop's Island, Boston Harbor, where it was dis- 
charged. 

Mr Hersey was also a volunteer member of the Lincoln 
Light Infantry at Fortress Monroe. 

CHARLES H. F. STODDER. 

Age 24. 

Of Hingham ; mustered as musician in Co. E, Dec. 2, 1861 ; 
mustered out for re-enlistment Jan. 4, 1864; re-enlisted Jan. 
5, 1864; mustered out June 29, 1865, by reason of close of 
the war. Whole term of service, three years and nearly seven 
months. 

Mr. Stodder was with the Lincoln Light Infantry at Fortress 
Monroe, and was one of the volunteers who left Hingham on 
the 18th of May. 

PRIVATES. 

EPHRAIM ANDERSON. 

Age 35. 
Born in Hingham, and enlisted Feb. 20, 1862, for the quota of 



204 HlkcHAM IN THE CIVIL WAR. 

the town, as private in Co. F ; mustered out Jan. 4, 1 864, for 
re-enlistment; finally mustered out June 29, 1865, by reason 
of close of the war, having been in the service three years 
and four months. 

OTIS LINCOLN BATTLES. 

Born in Hingham, Feb. 20, 1843. 

Enlisted at Hingham, and was mustered at Camp Cameron, 
Cambridge, Mass., as private in Co. E, Dec. 2, 1861. Dis- 
charged at Liberty, Va., Jan. 4, 1864; and Jan. 5, re-enlisted 
as veteran for three years, or during the war. 

With the exception of Gettysburg, when he was detailed for 
special service, Mr. Battles was present in every engagement 
set down to the Thirty-second Regiment. At the battle of 
Cold Harbor he was wounded and disabled, and for a time was 
in the hospital at Davis Island, N.Y. He subsequently was 
taken to Readville, Mass., and for a short time, in the summer 
of '64, was at home in Hingham. On regaining health, he left 
for City Point, Va., and rejoined the regiment in season to com- 
mence the campaign of the spring following, and was then in 
active service to the time of the surrender of Gen. Lee and the 
close of the war, when he was mustered out at Washington, 
D.C, June 29, 1865. 

* DANIEL LEAVITT BEAL. 
Co. F. 

LABAN O. BEAL. 

Enrolled from Hingham, age 26. 

Enlisted for the quota of the town, and was mustered Feb. 20, 
1862, as private in Co. F; Jan. 30, 1863, was discharged for 
disability. 

* WILLIAM BREENE. 

Co. A. . 



THIRTY-SECOND REGIMENT. 205 

HENRY F. BINNEY. 
Co. E. 

PATRICK CALLAHAN. 

Enrolled from Newton, Mass., age 29. 

Returned by the selectmen of Hingham as serving on the quota 
of the town; mustered as private in Co. K, Aug. 16, 1862. 
Service terminated March 9, 1863, by reason of disabihty.- 

ICHABOD W. CHANDLER. 

Age 31. 

EnHsted from Hingham for the quota of the town, Dec. 2, 1861, 
as private in Co. E ; transferred March 11, 1864, to Veteran 
Reserve Corps. After a service of more than three years, 
was mustered out by reason of close of the war. 

MOSES RITTER CHURCHILL. 

Born in Hingham, June 10, 1846. 
Enlisted as private in Co. F, and was mustered March 4, 1865. 

Leaving Gallop's Island, he joined the regiment with the 
Army of the Potomac, was in the engagement at Petersburg and 
other battles of the Thirty-second ; and June 29, 1865, by special 
order of War Department, was mustered out of service. . 

RUFUS CHURCHILL. 

Age 35. 

Born in Hingham, and enlisted Feb. 20, 1862, as private in 
Co. F. Becoming disabled, he was detailed for special duty, 
and finally discharged for disability. May 30, 1863 ; having been 
in service one year and three montTis. 

GUSTAVUS P. CORTHELL. 

Age 18. 

Enlisted from Hingham, Feb. 20, 1862, as private in Co. F. 



2o6 HINGHAM IN THE CIVIL WAR. 

Being unfitted for service, by reason of sickness, he was dis- 
charged May 28, 1863, one year and three months from the 
time of mustering in. 

WILLIAM FARDY. 

Enrolled from Hingham, age 18. 

Private in Co. E, and was mustered Dec. 2, 1861 ; discharged for 
disability Oct. 27, 1862, having been in service nearly eleven 
months. Served for the quota of Hingham, and is included 
in the official list returned by the selectmen. 

GEORGE FRENCH, Jun. 

r 

Born in Hingham, Nov. 6, 1822. 

Enlisted in Hingham, and was mustered as private in Co. A, 
Nov. 2, 1 861 ; was sick after the regiment left Harrison's 
Landing, and confined in Camp Convalescent a year ; sent to 
Washington, D.C., and there transferred to the Invalid Corps. 
Discharged for re-enlistment in the Veteran Reserve Corps, 
and accredited to Worcester, Mass., May 5, 1864. Mustered 
out at Washington, D.C., Nov. 15, 1865. 

HENRY GARDNER. 

Born in Hingham, Oct. 6, 1840. 

EnHsted at Fort Warren, Boston Harbor, Feb. 17, 1862, as 
private in Co. F, and was mustered the same day. After 
joining the Army of the Potomac, he remained with the regi- 
ment up to Sept. 17, 1862, and was in the seven days' fight 
in July, and also at the battle of Antietam in September. 
Disabled by sickness, he was sent to the hospital at Phila- 
delphia, where he remained for one year. On the 30th of Sep- 
tember, 1863, he was transferred to Co. D of the Sixteenth 
Regiment Veteran Reserve Corps, and Nov. 30, 1864, at Holli- 
daysburg, Pa., was promoted sergeant. After the expiration 
of his term of enlistment, he was mustered out at Plarrisburg, 
Pa., March 20, 1865. 



THIRTY-SECOND REGIMENT. 207 

STEPHEN PUFFER GOULD. 

Born in Hingham, age 34. 

Private in Co. E; mustered Dec. 2, 1861. Feb. 5, 1863, he 
was honorably discharged on account of disability caused by 
accidental injury. 

WILLIAM KIMBALL GOULD. 

Born in Medford, Mass., July 9, 1838. 

A resident of Hingham, he was drafted at Taunton, Mass., July 
30, 1863, to fill the quota then required from the town. 

First assigned to Co. F of the Twenty-second Regiment, 
M. V. I., three years, he was conveyed to Long Island, Boston 
Harbor, and after a brief stay, with a small detachment of troops, 
joined the regiment, then in camp at Bealton Station, Va. A 
few weeks were here spent in scouting and skirmishing, when 
he was transferred to Co. D of the Fifth United States Battery, 
with which he remained for ten months. From the commence- 
ment of this term, his service proved an active one ; North Anna, 
Spottsylvania, Wilderness, Petersburg, Weldon Railroad, and 
other engagements, being included in the record of battles in 
which the Fifth Battery sustained an important and honorable 
part. 

He was next assigned to Co. L, of the Thirty-second Regi- 
ment, M. V. I., with which he continued up to the time of the sur- 
render of Gen. Lee, and the close of the war. His entire term of 
service includes nearly two years ; during which he was at no 
time absent from disease, and his place in the ranks was broken 
for a few days only, from the effects of a slight accidental 
injury. 

It may be proper to repeat in this connection what will be 
found under other records in succeeding pages of the volume, 
that of the entire number who entered the service, either as 
natives of Hingham or who were embraced in the quota of the 
town, three only did so under decree of a draft. These were 
drawn at Taunton, July 20, 1863, viz. : Dr. Don Pedro Wilson, 
Sewall Pugsley, and William Kimball Gould, the latter being 
now the sole survivor. 



2o8 HINGHAM IN THE CIVIL WAR. 

At the time of the draft, the purchase of commutation or the 
procuring of a substitute, Mr. Gould believed he could not well 
afford, and at once magnanimously accepted what his fortune 
seemed to have appointed. Entering the army under circum- 
stances calculated to chill patriotism and depress the spirit, his 
ready acquiescence and loyal fidelity can scarcely be too highly 
commended. That he evaded no duty, fought bravely, and 
cheerfully endured exposure, fatigue, and privation, is the noble 
record he bears on his return to his home and the pursuits of 
peace. 

WARREN HATCH, Jun. 
Born in Hingham, Jan. 7, 1843. 

Mr. Hatch enlisted at Hingham, Oct. 30, 1861, as private in Co. 
A, and was mustered the 24th of November following. 

Called to active service at the front, he took part in the 
battles of Malvern Hill, Gainesville, Second Bull Run, Chantilly, 
and Antietam. 

During the autumn and early part of the winter of 1862, he 
suffered severely from chronic diarrhoea, and finally through the 
effects of this disease became entirely disabled. Leaving the 
regiment, he was conveyed to the Patent Office Hospital on the 
31st of December. After remaining here a few weeks, he was 
next taken to the Carver United States General Hospital at 
Washington, and finally, from continued sickness and disability, 
was granted a furlough of sixty days. 

At the expiration of this time, he returned to Washington 
with health little, if at all, improved. Being reported unfit for 
the field, he was detailed as clerk in Carver Hospital, and con- 
tinued to act in this capacity till the expiration of his term of 
enlistment, when, by order of the War Department, he was mus- 
tered out of service at Boston, Mass. 

SAMUEL JAMES HENDERSON. 

Born in Boston, July, 1828. 

Enlisted at Hingham, Oct. 25, 1 861, as private in Co. A, and 
was mustered Nov. 25, 1861. 



THIRTY-SECOND REGIMENT. 



209 



Mr. Henderson left for the seat of war May 26, 1862, and 
was in active service till Aug. 15, when, on leaving Harrison's 
Landing, he was detailed as nurse in the brigade hospital, 
under surgeon Z. B. Adams. Capable and reliable, he quickly- 
proved the wisdom of the appointment ; and as experience soon 
gave efficiency, he became almost indispensable, and was finally 
retained for duty in the hospital department until the expiration 
of his term of enlistment. Mustered out Nov. 25, 1864, at 
Petersburg, Va. 

* JOHN QUINCY HERSEY. 
Co. E. 

WILLIAM HARRISON HERSEY. 

Born in Hingham, Nov. 27, 1840. 

Enlisted at Hingham, Feb. 15, 1862 ; and Feb. 19 was mustered 
as private in Co. F. 

Mr. Hersey was in the following battles : Second Bull Run, 
Antietam, Fredericksburg, Chancellorsville, and Gettysburg, 
where he left the regiment for the hospital, remaining from July 
3 to Aug. 3, 1863 ; when he was removed to the hospital at 
Alexandria, where he continued until Oct. 21, 1863, when he 
was discharged for disability. 

WILLIAM HERSEY, JuxV. 

Born in Hingham, Jan. 27, 1820. 

Enlisted at Hingham, Dec. 2, i86r, and on the 17th of the 
month was mustered at Camp Cameron as private in Co. E. 

Mr. Hersey was with the regiment in the engagements con- 
nected with its earlier history. Afterwards disabled by sickness, 
he left the ranks Sept. 14, 1862, at Sharpsburg, and was confined 
six months in the hospital at York, Penn. ; mustered out by 
reason of disability, April 15, 1863, having been in the service 
sixteen months. 
27 



2IO HINGHAM IN THE CIVIL WAR. 

SYLVANUS H. HIGGINS. 
Age 23. 

Enrolled Feb. 20, 1862, from Hingham, in Co. F; Jan. 4, 1864, 
mustered out for re-enlistment; Jan. 5, 1864, enlisted as 
veteran from Charlestown, Mass.; and June 29, 1865, was 
mustered out by order of War Department. 

* WALLACE HUMPHREY. 
Co. E. 

JOSHUA JACOB, JuN. 

Born in Hingham, Feb. 6, 1843. 

May 26, 1862, enlisted at Fort Warren, Boston Harbor, as pri- 
vate in Co. D, and the same day was mustered into service. 

After joining the Army of the Potomac, he was with the 
regiment up to the time it left Sharpsburg to cross Harper's 
Ferry, when, being disabled by sickness, he was obliged to "fall 
out," and make the best of his way alone. Placed in the hands 
of a physician, he was conveyed to Camp Convalescent at 
Alexandria, Va., where he remained until Dec. 23, 1862, when 
by virtue of surgeon's certificate of disability, he was mustered 
out of service. 

FRANK JERMYN. 

Born in May, 1S32, at Cavan, Delincose County, Ireland. 

January, 1862, enlisted at Hingham as private in Co. F, and was 
mustered Feb 10, 1862. 

He was with the Army of the Potomac on the Peninsula till 
disabled by fever and chronic diarrhoea, when he was conveyed 
to the Fairfax Seminary Hospital, where he was finally dis- 
charged for general disability, Dec. 31, 1862. 

* GARDNER JONES. 
Co. F. 



THIRTY-SECOND REGIMENT. 211 

MORALLUS LANE. 

Born in Hingham, March lo, 1839. 

Mustered in Co. F, Feb. 15, 1862; confined by sickness in hos- 
pital at West Philadelphia from Aug. 10, 1862, to Oct. 18, 
1862, and then and there discharged for disability. 

ALFRED AUGUSTUS LINCOLN. 

Born in Hingham, Se^Dt. 25, 1838. 

Was one of the thirty-seven volunteers who left Hingham on 
the 1 8th of May, 1861, to join the Lincoln Light Infantry, 
then stationed at P'ortress Monroe ; re-enlisted as private, 
Dec. 2, 1 86 1, in Co. E, Thirty-second Regiment; being disa- 
bled by sickness, was sent from Harrison's Landing to Black- 
well's Island, New York Harbor ; then to Fort Hamilton ; 
afterwards to Camp Convalescent, Alexandria ; and thence 
to Lincoln Hospital at Washington, where on the 14th 
of February, 1863, he was mustered out of service by reason 
of surgeon's certificate of disability. 

MELTIAH LORING. 

Born in Boston, March 23, 1837. 

Enlisted at Hingham, Oct. 31, 1861, and was mustered as private 
into Co. A, Nov. 25, 1861. 

Spending the winter at Fort Warren, Boston Harbor, he left 
with the regiment for the front, May 26, 1862, and was in the 
battles of Chancellorsville, Gettysburg, Second Bull Run, Cold 
Harbor, Weldon Railroad, and Petersburg. 

Though fortunate in passing through these different engage- 
ments uninjured, he suffered at one period from sickness, and 
was confined by fever for some months in the Emory' Hospital 
at Washington, D.C. 

During the summer of 1863 he was detailed for the charge 
and conducting of conscripts to the seat of war, and in the 
course of the year came repeatedly to Massachusetts for this 
purpose. 



212 HINGHAM IN THE CIVIL WAR. 

His discharge was obtained near Petersburg, Va. ; and he 
left the service Nov, 24, 1864, having been in the army three 
years, — the full term of enlistment. 



FRANK HARLEY MILLER. 

Born at Salem, Mass., Oct. 3, 1843. 

Enlisted at Hingham, Dec. 2, 1861, and Dec. 12 vi^as mustered 
as private in Co. E ; re-enlisted as veteran at Liberty, Va., 
Jan. 4, 1864. 

Included in his record are the following engagements : An- 
tietam, Chancellorsville, Gettysburg, Rappahannock Station, 
Wilderness, Laurel Hill, Spottsylvania, Cold Harbor, Petersburg, 
and others. At the battle of Hatcher's Run, Feb. 6, 1865, he 
was wounded in the fore-arm by a gun-shot, and taken to the 
field hospital. Returning to Massachusetts, he was discharged 
June 25, 1865, by reason of disability from wound, having been 
in service three years and nearly seven months. 

PAUL McNEIL. 

Born in Edinburgh, Scotland, May 8, 1812. 

Enlisted at Hingham, and Nov. 12, 1861, was mustered as 
private in Co. A. 

Served as steward at Fort Warren, and at the request of Col. 
Dimmick, and by consent 'of Col. Parker, remained at the fort 
after the departure of the battalion. Discharged in December, 
1862. Re-enlisted Nov. 27, 1863, at Concord, N.H., as private 
in Co. F, of the Second Regiment, N. H. I., three years. Under 
the second enlistment was mostly employed in hospital service, 
and for ten months was himself confined by sickness at the 
hospital at Point Lookout. 

Served six months after peace, engaged in provost-guard duty 
at Richmond and Fredericksburg. Mustered out Dec. 18, 1865. 



THIRTY-SECOND REGIMENT. 



213 



HENRY G. MORSE. 
Age 30. 

Enrolled from the town of Weymouth ; mustered in Co. F, Feb. 
24, 1862, and discharged April 19, 1865, by reason of expira- 
tion of term of service. Returned among the names certified 
by the selectmen as being upon the quota of Hingham. 

* HIRAM NEWCOMB. 
CO. E. 

JOHN M. NOLAN. 

Age 25. 

Enlisted from Hingham for the town's quota, and was mustered 
Oct. 31, 1 86 1, as private in Co. A. Discharged Nov. 24, 1864, 
by reason of expiration of term of enlistment. 

Mr. Nolan shared in the general experience of the Thirty- 
second from first to last, did his duty faithfully, and retired from 
the ranks with a good record. 

NATHANIEL BLAISDELL PEARE. 

Born in Greene, Me., Jan. 18, 183 1. 

Enlisted at Hingham, Dec. 2, 1861, and the same day was mus- 
tered as private in Co. E. 

Mr. Peare was in the engagement at Malvern Hill, and was 
mustered out by reason of impaired sight, at Harrison's Landing, 
Va., Aug. 14, 1862. 

GEORGE M. PROUTY. 

Age 30. 

Returned by the selectmen of Hingham as upon the quota of 
this town. Mustered Feb. 24, 1862, as private in Co. F. 
Mustered out Jan. 4, 1864, for re-enlistment. Finally mus- 
tered out by reason of close of the war, July 19, 1865. 



214 HINGHAM IN THE CIVIL WAR. 

JAMES B. PROUTY. 

Enrolled from Hingham, age 28. 

Mustered Dec. 2, 1 861, as private in Co. E; discharged for 
disability, July i, 1862, after a service of seven months. 

THOMAS RAFFERTY, JuN. 

Born in Hingham, age 18. 

Enlisted for the quota of the town, Dec. 2, 1 861, as private in 
Co. E; discharged by reason of disability, Jan. 8, 1863, after 
a service of thirteen months. 

FOSTER REMINGTON. 

Born in Hingham, July 9, 1836. 

Enlisted Dec. 2, at Oasis Hall, Hingham, and was mustered as 
private in Co. E, Dec. 17, 1 861, at Camp Cameron. 

Mr. Remington was in the battles of Antietam and Second 
Bull Run, but shortly after was taken sick, and sent to the 
general hospital at Fairfax, Va. Thence he was transferred to 
Fort Schuyler Hospital, N.Y., and detailed to act as nurse. 
From there he was transferred to Bedloe's Island Hospital, and 
appointed assistant steward, serving as such until Dec. 17, 1864, 
when he was mustered out by reason of expiration of term of 
enlistment. 

WILLIAM F. RILEY. 

Age 30. 

Enlisted for the quota of Hingham, and was mustered Dec. 2, 
1 86 1, as private in Co. E ; Jan. 4, 1864, mustered out for re- 
enlistment ; finally mustered out June 29, 1865 by reason of 
close of the war. 

Mr. Riley was in the service three years and nearly six 
months. 



THIRTY-SECOND REGIMENT. 215 

JOHN ELLESON SNELL. 
Born in New Albany, County of Annapolis, N.S., June 17, 1822. 

Enlisted at Hingham, Nov. 30, 1861, and Dec. 16 was mustered 
at Camp Cameron as private in Co. E. 

Was present in battles from Second Bull Run to Gettysburg, 
inclusive ; also engaged at Petersburg. 

In the fight at Gettysburg he was wounded in the leg, and, 
being disabled, was conveyed to division hospital, where he 
remained for several weeks. Afterwards he was taken to hospi- 
tal at York, Penn., and in March, 1864, was transferred to Phila- 
delphia, where, suffering from the effects of protracted marches, 
a portion of his foot was amputated. Following this, was taken 
to McClellan Hospital, where he continued till October, when 
he reported for duty, and rejoined his regiment, having been 
confined by wounds and sickness fourteen months. 

Mustered out at Petersburg, Va., by reason of expiration of 
term of service. 

JOHN SPRAGUE SOUTHER. 

Born in Hingham, Jan. 29, 1819. 

At the outbreak of the war he enlisted for three months in the 
Lincoln Light Infantry, and left Hingham with this company 
on the afternoon of tne 17th of April, 1861. Entering service 
for the second time, he enlisted Jan. 20, 1862, in Co. A, of 
the Thirty-second Regiment. 

Unable to withstand continued exposure, and the fatigue 
attendant on frequent and protracted marches, his health con- 
tinued to fail until he became entirely disabled. Six weeks 
were spent in the hospital at Washington, D.C. ; and from this 
institution he was discharged for disability, Nov. 10, 1862. 

* DEMERICK STODDER. 
Co. F. 



/ 



2l6 H INGHAM IN THE CIVIL WAR. 

FRANKLIN A. STODDER. 

Age 1 8. 

Enlisted in Hingham. Mustered Oct. 25, 1861. Afterwards 
transferred to Veteran Reserve Corps. 

* HORACE L. STUDLEY. 
CO. E. 

WILLIAM TAYLOR. 

Born at Sterling, Mass., July 22, 1818. 

Enlisted in Hingham, Feb. 13, and was mustered in Co. F, 
Feb. 21, 1862; was with the regiment until Aug. 25, when, 
being unable to march, was ordered by Capt. Cunningham to 
convalescent camp in the field ; afterwards placed on detached 
service by order of the War Department ; discharged at the 
general hospital, Nov. 25, 1863, by reason of surgeon's certifi- 
cate of disability. 

Mr. Taylor was a volunteer in the Lincoln Light Infantry, 
and left Hingham for Fortress Monroe, May 18, 1861. 

WILLIAM HENRY THOMAS. 

Born in Hingham, June 12, 1845. 

Enlisted Oct. 31, 1 861, and Nov. 25 was mustered as private 
in Co. A. 

Taking part in the early experience of the Thirty-second, he 
left Fort Warren, Boston Harbor, May 26, 1862, and, with the 
exception of Antietam, was with the regiment until after the 
battle of Fredericksburg, when, b^ng disabled by chronic diar- 
rhoea, he was sent to Emory Hospital, Washington, D.C., April 
19, 1863. Detailed first as a nurse, and afterwards as ward-master, 
he remained at this place until the expiration of his term of 
enlistment. 

Aug. 10, 1864. he was transferred to the Veteran Reserve 



THIRTY-SECOND REGIMENT. 



217 



Corps, from which he was finally mustered out, at Emory Hospi- 
tal, Nov. 25, 1864. 

* CHARLES E. WILDER. 
CO. E. 

EZRA WILDER, JuN. 

Born in Hingham, Nov. 26, 1843. 

Enlisted and was mustered into service, Dec. 2, 1861, at Hing- 
ham, as private in Co. E. 

Left Fort Warren, Boston Harbor, in May, 1862, for Wash- 
ington, D.C. After a short stay was ordered to the vicinity of 
Alexandria, Va., and thence to Harrison's Landing, where he 
arrived on the last day of the seven days' fight. 

Here he became disabled by sickness, and was taken to the 
hospital at West Philadelphia, where he was confined for nearly 
three months. Having somewhat improved, he was transferred 
to the convalescent camp at Alexandria, and shortly after left to 
rejoin his regiment, then stationed at Sharpsburg. 

For a time Mr. Wilder was in active field-service, and partici- 
pated in the engagements at Malvern Hill and Fredericksburg. 
Disease, however, soon unfitted him for duty ; and he was dis- 
charged for disability on the twenty-second day of March, 1863, 
at Potomac Creek, Va. 

GEORGE WILDER. 

Born in Hingham, July 9, 1833. 

Private in Co. A. Enlisted from Hingham for the quota of the 
town, Nov. 3, 1 86 1. Mustered Nov. 28, 1861 ; and March 7, 
1863, after a service of one year and four months, was dis- 
charged on account of disability. ■ 

Mr. Wilder took part with the regiment in the battles at 

Antietam and Fredericksburg, and prior to being mustered out 

was sick at the regimental hospital, near Falmouth, Va., where 

he was confined about three months. 
28 



2 1 8 HINGHAM IN THE CIVIL WAR. 

JOSHUA WILDER. 

Born in Hingham, Dec. 19, 1813. 

Enlisted as private in Co. A, and was mustered at Camp Dim- 
mick, Nov. 2, 1861. 

Tlie following winter was spent at Fort Warren ; but having 
been detailed for duty in the Commissary Department, he re- 
mained at this post after the departure of the regiment, till the 
29th of November, 1862, when he was discharged at Boston for 
disability. 

tHORATIO PHILANDER WILLARD. 

CO. A. 

GEORGE ADAM WOLFE. 

Age 45. 

Enlisted for the quota of Hingham ; private in Co. E, and was 
mustered Dec. 2, 1861. Discharged for re-enlistment Jan. 4, 
and mustered as veteran Jan. 5, 1864. Discharged June 29, 
1865, by reason of close of the war. 

Mr. Wolfe's service included three years and nearly seven 
months. He was in several engagements, and served efficiently 
as a member of the pioneer corps. 




CHAPTER XI. 

THREE years' MEN CONTINUED. 

Thirty-fifth Regiment — Thirty-eighth Regiment — Thirt>'-ninth Regiment — Fortieth Regi- 
ment — Fifty-fourth Regiment — - Fifty-fifth Regiment — Fifty-sixth Regiment — Fifty- 
seventh Regiment — Fifty-eighth Regiment — Fifty-ninth Regiment. 

THIRTY-FIFTH REGIMENT. 

THE Thirty-fifth Regiment was mustered into the service of 
the United States Aug. 21. 1862, left Massachusetts the 
day following, and was mustered out June 9, 1865. 

Few organizations from the State exhibit a more extended or 
a more severe experience. It rendered efficient service in Vir- 
ginia, Kentucky, Tennessee, Arkansas, and Mississippi, and 
greatly distinguished itself at the taking of the City of Jackson, 
the capital of Mississippi. It was present at the battles at 
Antietam, Fredericksburg, Campbell Station, Siege of Knoxville, 
Spottsylvania, North Anna, Cold Harbor, Weldon Railroad, 
South Mountain, Vicksburg, Poplar Spring Church, Hatcher's 
Run, Fort Sedgwick, Fort Mahone, and Petersburg. 

Of enlistments connected with Hingham, the .regiment 
included the following, viz. : — 



LIEUTENANT 

OLIVER BURRILL. 

Born in Hingham, July 2, 1835. 

Enlisted at Weymouth, Aug. 2, and was mustered in Co. H, 
Aug:. II, 1862, with the rank of second lieutenant. 

He left the State with the regiment, Aug. 22, and went 
directly to the field of active service, taking part in the battle of 



220 BIAGHAM IN THE CIVIL WAR. 

South Mountain, Sept. 14. He commanded the company at the 
battle of Antietam, was in the battles of Fredericksburg and 
Sulphur Springs, and received promotion to rank of first lieuten- 
ant Dec. 15, 1862. Lieut. Burrill was sick with fever in camp in 
front of Fredericksburg, and, before recovery, chronic diarrhoea 
prevented a return to active service. He was in hospital at 
Fortress Monroe about four weeks, and discharged Oct. 6, 1863, 
for disability. 

SERGEANT 

GEORGE MARTIN ADAMS. 

Born in Hingham, Oct. 20, 1840. 

Enlisted at Weymouth, Aug. 6, 1862, as sergeant in Co. H, and 
was mustered Aug. 12, 1862. He was in the engagements at 
South Mountain, Antietam, and Fredericksburg, and was 
slightly wounded. 

He was also confined in a Baltimore hospital for two months ; 
then transferred to the Veteran Reserve Corps. Mustered out 
June 27, 1865, at Washington, D.C., by reason of expiration of 
term of service. 

Serg. Adams was a volunteer in the Lincoln Light Infantry ; 
left Hingham on the afternoon of April 17, 1861, and was three 
months at Fortress Monroe and vicinity. 

MUSICIAN 

JASON GARDNER. 

Born in Hingham, Nov. 28, 1828. 

Enlisted at Weymouth, on the quota of that town, Aug. 6, and 
was mustered in Co. H, as musician, Aug. 11, 1862. 

Mr. Gardner went with the regiment directly to the seat of 
war, and shared the duties of his office at the battles of South 
Mountain, Antietam, and Fredericksburg. Also accompanied 
the regiment through the Mississippi campaign, and was present 
at the surrender of Vicksburg, the capture of the City of Jack- 
son, and the siege of Knoxville, Tenn. 



THREE YEARS' MEN. 221 

While in Tennessee, January, 1864, he re^ceived orders to 
report to the brigade band-master for duty. The corps after- 
wards left Tennessee, aad went to Annapolis, Md., where it was 
re-organized, and marched to the front in time to take part in the 
battle of the Wilderness. Here the band was ordered to the 
hospital, where it remained till January, 1865. Orders were 
then received to move with the regiment to the lines before 
Petersburg. 

Mr. Gardner was in the service till the close of the war, and 
was mustered out June 9, 1865. 

/ 

PRIVATES. 

CALEB HADLEY BEAL. 
Born in Hingham, Jan. 15, 1833. 

At the commencement of the war he was employed as book- 
keeper in the city of New York, and enlisted May 23, 1861, as 
private in Co. H, Fourteenth Regiment Regular State Militia, 
Brooklyn, N.Y., — afterwards designated the Eighty-fourth New 
York Volunteers. Commissioned second lieutenant, Co. E, 
One Hundred and Seventh New York Volunteers, and mustered 
in after the battle of Chancellorsville, where he was in command 
of the color-division of the regiment. Resigned his commission 
as second lieutenant, Dec. 20, 1863. Re-enlisted June 7, 1864, as 
prvate in Co. K of the Thirty-fifth Regiment, M. V. I., three years. 

His list of engagements includes first and second Bull Run, 
South Mountain, Antietam, Fredericksburg, Rappahannock 
Station, Chancellorsville, Spottsylvania, Gettysburg, Mine 
Explosion, Weldon Railroad, Hatcher's Run, and siege of Peters- 
burg. Finally transferred to Co. I of the Twenty-ninth Mass. 
Volunteers, and mustered out from this regiment at Readville, 
July 29, 1865, as sergeant. 

* DAVID W. GUSHING. 
CO. H. 

* WILLIAM DUNBAR, JuN. 
CO. A. 



222 HINGHAM IN THE CIVIL WAR. 

* PEREZ L. FEARING, JtiN. 
CO. I. 

HIRAM THOMAS. 

Born in Hingham, April 13, 1843. 

Enlisted as private in Co. D, Aug. 16, 1862, and accredited to 
Waltham, Mass. 

At the battle of Antietam, on the 17th of September, one 
month from the time of enlistment, he was accidentally disabled, 
and sent to the hospital for treatment. After a confinement 
of several months, his health being restored, he was detailed 
for clerical services, a situation for which he was well qualified. 
Lastly transferred to the hospital department at Philadelphia, 
where he remained until his discharge. May 11, 1865. 



THIRTY-EIGHTH REGIMENT. 

Seven companies of the Thirty-eighth Regiment were re- 
cruited at Camp Stanton, Lynnfield, and three (Cambridge 
companies) at Camp Cameron. It was mustered into the ser- 
vice Aug. 24, 1862, left the State Aug. 26 for Baltimore, and 
Nov. 10, embarked for New Orleans. In March, 1S63, it joined 
the brigade at Baton Rouge, and on the 13th marched to Port 
Hudson to assist in the demonstration made to aid Admiral 
Farragut in passing the batteries. It was in the Western 
Louisiana campaign under Gen. Banks, and afterwards took 
part in all the assaults upon Port Hudson, suffering a heavy 
loss. It also shared in the Red River Expedition, under Banks. 

The regiment returned to Virginia in the summer of 1864, 
and went through the Shenandoah Valley campaign under 
Sheridan ; and was for a time under the command of Sherman in 
Georgia and North Carolina. After an extended, wearisome, 



THREE YEARS' MEN 223 

and perilous experience, it was mustered out at Savannah, June 
30, 1865, by reason of the close of the war, and finally reached 
home and was discharged July 13, 1865, eleven months' pay 
being then due the regiment. 

The Thirty-eighth was present in the engagements at Bisland, 
Port Hudson, Cane River, Mansura, Opequan, Fisher's Hill, and 
Cedar Creek. 

The following are the enlistments of natives or residents of 
Hinghara : — 

CAPTAIN. 

JAMES A. WADE. 

Age 22. 

Served for quota of Hingham. Enrolled from Boston, and 
mustered as captain, Aug. 20, 1862. Resigned March 3, 
1863. 

LIEUTENANT, 

LOUIS T. (V.') (Z.-) CAZAIRE. 

Accredited to the first quota of Hingham; was mustered as first 
sergeant in Co. I, Aug. 21, 1862, being at that time eighteen 
years of age; promoted second lieutenant, June 16, 1863. 
Not mustered. 

Lieut. Cazaire, while in Louisiana with his regiment, performed 
his duties with credit to himself and the town he represented. 
April 19, 1864, he was discharged to receive a commission in 
the Eighty-ninth U. S. Colored Troops. 

From the printed history of the Thirty-eighth Regiment, we 
learn that " Lieut. Cazaire afterwards distinguished himself for 
bravery and coolness on the occasion of the disaster to the 
steamship, 'Great Republic,' and his old companions of the 
Thirty-eighth have been gratified to see the public commenda- 
tion of his conduct." He was on the staff of Gen. Canby when 
that general was killed by the Modocs, and is now military 
instructor in a college in Maine. 

1 Adjutant-general's Report. 

2 History of Thirty-eighth Regiment. 



224 HINGHAM IN THE CIVIL WAR. 

SERGEANT 

BILLINGS MERRITT. 

Age 31. 

Resident of Scitiiate ; served for the quota of Hingham. Ser- 
geant in Co. D. Mustered Aug. 20, 1862, and discharged 
June 30, 1865, by reason of the close of the war. 

PRIVATES. 

HENRY BROWN. 

Age 29. 

Resident of Scituate ; served for the quota of Hingham. Mus- 
tered as private in Co. D, Aug. 20, 1862. Transferred to the 
navy July 13, 1864. 

CYRUS H. CHASE. 

Age 29. 

Enlisted from Hingham, and included in the town's quota. Mus- 
tered as private in Co. I, Aug. 24, 1862. 

* THOMAS HERVEY. 
CO. I. 

* JOSHUA ROACH. 
CO. H. 

CUSHMAN ROUNDS. 

Enlisted for the quota of Hingham ; town papers say, " Thirty- 
eighth regiment ; Capt. Wade — three years." 

PETER H. ROYAL. 

On authority of town documents, enlisted in Thirty-eighth regi- 
ment. 



THREE YEARS' MEN. 225 



THIRTY-NINTH REGIMENT. 

The Thirty-ninth Massachusetts Infantry was recruited prin- 
cipally from Bristol, Essex, Middlesex, Norfolk, Plymouth, and 
Suffolk Counties. Of those from Plymouth County, a large 
proportion were from the towns of Hingham, Scituate, and 
South Scituate. 

The regiment was organized at Lynnfield, Mass., but for a 
short time before leaving the State was located at Camp Stanton, 
in the town of Boxford. It was mustered into the United States 
service Sept. 4; arrived at Washington, D.C., Sept. 8, 1862; and 
June 2, 1865, was mustered out by reason of close of the war. 

The Thirty-ninth served upon picket-guard duty in the 
Department of Defences of Washington until July 12, 1863, 
when it joined the Army of the Potomac. It did not, however, 
take part in any engagement until May 5, 1864, when, being 
ordered out on the Brock Pike, it advanced in line of battle 
through the woods to the support of a body of troops in front, 
then being hard pressed by the enemy. From that time it was 
in nearly, if not all the conflicts that took place between the 
Army of the Potomac and the Confederate forces in Virginia. 
The last year of its history was marked by heavy losses in killed, 
wounded, and prisoners ; Col. Davis, the commander of the 
regiment, being among those who were killed. 

The battles in which it was engaged occurred in rapid succes- 
sion. They were Mine Run, Wilderness, Spottsylvania, North 
Anna, Tolopotomy, Bethesda Church, Petersburg, Weldon 
Railroad, Dabney's Mills, Gravelly Run, and Five Forks. 

Of the thirty-eight persons in the regiment who were con- 
nected with the town of Hingham, thirty-seven were in Co. G ; 
and fourteen of the number gave up their lives for the preserva- 
tion of the Union before the regiment was mustered out. 

The Thirty-ninth was present at the surrender of Gen. Lee, 
and also was among the military organizations that participated 
in the grand review at Washington, D.C. 

The names of the persons referred to as being connected with 
the town of Hingham are, — 
29 



226 HINGHAM IN THE CIVIL WAR. 

LIEUTENANTS. 

THADDEUS CHURCHILL. 

Born in Hingham, age 39. 

Enlisted from the town of Quincy, Mass., and was sergeant in 
Co. D; mustered Aug. 4, 1862; discharged from Thirty-ninth 
regiment Oct. 18, 1863, for promotion as second lieutenant 
in Third Regiment (colored), United States Army. 



JOHN H. PROUTY. 

Age 23. 

Resident of South Scituate ; served for quota of Hingham ; 
sergeant in Co. G, and was mustered Sept. 2, 1862 ; promoted 
second lieutenant ; discharged after close of the war, June 2, 
1865, having served two years and nine months. 

Lieut. Prouty was one of the thirty-seven volunteers who left 
Hingham May 18, 1861, to join the Lincoln Light Infantry then 
stationed at Fortress Monroe. 



SERGEANTS. 

JOHN W. BAILEY. 

Age 19. 

Enrolled from Hingham, and served for the quota of the town ; 
was sergeant in Co. G, and mustered Sept. 2, 1862; dis- 
charged June 2, 1865, by reason of close of the war, having 
had a service of two years and nine months. 

Serg. Bailey shared in all the experience of his regiment, 
from first to last. 

* HENRY C. FRENCH. 
Co. G. 



THREE YEARS' MEN. 22/ 

WILLIAM HENRY JACOB. 

Age 31. 

Enlisted from Hingham for the quota of the town ; was sergeant 
in Co. G, and mustered Sept. 2, 1862 ; was detached for 
guarding rebel prisoners from Fortress Monroe to Washing- 
ton, and similar services. 

At the battle of Weldon Railroad he, with others, fell a pris- 
oner in the hands of the enemy, and was sent to Richmond, Va. 
After remaining here a few weeks, he was put on board the cars, 
destined to some point in the State of Georgia. While on the 
road, Serg. Jacob determined to avail himself of the first oppor- 
tunity which might offer to attempt his escape, however small 
the prospect of final success might be. Accordingly as the cars 
were on their way through North Carolina, favored by the dark- 
nessof the night, he leaped from the train and fortunately 
alighted without essential injury. With no other guide save the 
north star, he started for the Union lines, which, after a long, 
wearisome, and most perilous journey, he finally succeeded in 
safely reaching. 

CORPORALS. 

CHARLES GUSHING BAILEY. 

Born in Hingham, Sept. 2, 1842. 

In August, 1862, he enlisted as private in Co. G, and was mus- 
tered Sept. 2, 1862 ; promoted corporal. 

Participating in the general service to which the regiment was 
called, he was engaged in picket-duty along the Potomac, and 
also in provost-guard duty until Dec. 28, 1863, when he was 
discharged for re-enlistment as hospital steward at Washington, 
D.C. Being an accomplished penman, he was detached for 
clerical duty in the office of the surgeon-general, — a position 
which was retained till the autumn of 1865, when he was mus- 
tered out of service. 

His connection with the army covered three years ; four 



228 HINGHAM IN THE CIVIL WAR. 

weeks having been spent in Judiciary Square Hospital, Wash- 
ington, D.C., where he was confined by pneumonia. 

* BENJAMIN CURTIS LINCOLN. 
Co. G. 

* HENRY FELT MILLER. 
Co. G. 

CHARLES C. YOUNG. 

Age 32. 

Enlisted on the quota of Hingham. Corporal in Co. G; mus- 
tered Sept. 2, 1862, and discharged June 2, 1865, by reason 
of close of the war, having served two years and nine months. 

PRIVATES. 

* CHARLES EUGENE BATES. 
Co. G. 

TIMOTHY B. CHAPMAN. 

Resident of South Scituate, Mass., age 31. 

Reckoned on the quota of Hingham, and was mustered as 
private in Co. G, Sept. 2, 1862. 

Discharged June 2, 1865, by reason of close of the war. Time 
of service two years and nine months. 

ELEAZER CHUBBUCK. 

Age 18. 

Enrolled from Hingham, and served for the town's quota; mus- 
tered Sept. 2, 1862, as private in Co. G, and was discharged 
June 2, 1865, by reason of the close of the war. Term of 
service two years and nine months. 



THREE YEARS' MEN. 229 

* JAMES T. CHURCHILL. 
Co. G. 

JOHN CRESWELL. 

Born in Londonderry, Ireland, July 23, 1833. 

A volunteer in Co. I, Lincoln Light Infantry, Fourth Regiment, 
M. V. M., April 16, 1861, and was three months at Fortress 
Monroe; Aug. 9, 1862, enhsted at Hingham as private in Co. 
G, Thirty-ninth Regiment, and was mustered Sept. 2, 1862. 

Beginning at Brock Pike, Mr. Creswell took part in all the 
battles that followed, including Wilderness, Spottsylvania, North 
Anna, Bethesda Church, and White Oak Swamp, up to the 19th 
of June, when being accidentally disabled, at the Norfolk Rail- 
road, before Petersburg, he was removed to the Judiciary Square 
Hospital, at Washington. Remaining here a short time, he was 
granted a furlough, and returned to his home at Hingham. On 
rejoining his regiment, he was sent to Harewood Hospital, from 
which, after a stay of about ten weeks, he again reported for 
duty. From this time was in active service until the close of 
the war, when he was mustered out with the regiment, June 2, 
1865. 

* ANDREW J. DAMON. 
Co. G. 

* CHARLES E. FRENCH. 

Co. G. 

* GEORGE D. GARDNER. • 

Co. G. . 

ALVIN R. GLINES. 

Age 21. 

Enlisted fronf Hingham, and reckoned on the quota of the 



230 



HINGHAM IN THE CIVIL WAR. 



town; mustered Sept. 2, 1862, as private in Co. G ; mustered 
out June 2, 1865, by reason of close of the war. Service 
included two years and nine months. 

For a portion of the time Mr. Glines was detailed as teamster, 
and served in quartermaster's department. 

* ALBERT S. HAYNES. 
Co. G. 

ALBERT HERSEY. 
Co. G. 

Born in Hingham, age 29. 

Enlisted for the quota of the town, and was mustered as private 
in Co. G, Sept. 2, 1862; mustered out with the regiment, June 2, 
1865, having served two years and nine months. Was detailed 
for special service as teamster. 

GEORGE LORING HERSEY. 

Born in Hingham, July 18, 1830. 

Enlisted for the quota of Hingham, Aug. 11, 1862, and was 
mustered as private in Co. G. 

Mr. Hersey was with the regiment, and shared in its general 
experience, to the time of mustering out, June 2, 1865. Term of 
service, two years and nearly ten months. 

HENRY FOSTER HERSEY. 

Born in Hingliam, July 20, 1833. 

Enlisted under recruiting officer Edward Cazneau, for three 
years, Aug. 11, and was mustered Sept. 2, 1862, as private in 
Co. G, at Lynnfield, Mass. 

Mr. Hersey was in the battles of Mine Run, Wilderness, 
Laurel Hill, Spottsylvania, North Anna, Bethesda Church, 



THREE YEARS' MEN. 



231 



Petersburg, and Weldon Railroad. On the second day of the 
last named engagement, Aug. 19, 1864, he, with a large number 
of the men of the Thirty-ninth, including several from Hingham, 
was captured and sent to Richmond, where he was confined in 
Libby Prison. Subsequently transferred to Belle Isle, and 
thence to the Stockade Prison at Salisbury, N.C. He was paroled 
at Wilmington, March i, 1865, having been an inmate of these 
noted places for six months and ten days. 

During this period, Mr. Hersey witnessed much suffering 
among his prison companions from a want of proper food and 
shelter ; and his account of the treatment they received, and of 
the indignities heaped upon them by the prison officials, is far 
from flattering to those who were in authority. 

He describes some of the punishments inflicted upon our sol- 
diers as barbarous in the extreme. At Libby men were " bucked 
and gagged" for the most trifling offences. At Belle Isle a 
cruel punishment was practised upon those who presunled to 
stand up for their rights, or complained when robbed of their 
watches, rings, and mementos. The victim was first placed 
upon a horse made of joist ; both legs and arms were fastened 
in a semi-horizontal position, and there kept for perhaps an hour. 
When released, after the most excruciating sufferings, the victim 
would frequently fall to the earth like a dead person. Prisoners 
were sometimes shot down by the guards. Mr. Hersey wit- 
nessed a number of such instances ; among them a fellow-towns- 
man, the late Mr. Henry C. French, who was killed in this way 
without the slightest provocation. 

At Salisbury the prisoners were turned into an enclosed pen 
of several acres, very much the same as cattle are turned into a 
field, without shelter from the rain or sun. Strict guard was 
kepi along the boundaries of the stockade, and the whole enclos- 
ure was commanded by batteries. Those who were well and 
strong found partial shelter for themselves by digging holes in 
the ground. Rations, consisting of half a loaf of bread, " black- 
bean soup," made from a few Mississippi peas, and yellowish, 
rancid pork, were served once a day. 

Of a cheerful disposition, and possessing a vigorous consti- 
tution, Mr. Hersey was enabled to retain a fair degree of health, 



232 



HINGHAM TN THE CIVIL WAR. 



while many around him were dying from hunger, exposure, and 
despondency. After being released from prison he came home. 
He was discliarged from the service June 2, 1865, by reason of 
general order No. 26, to the Army of the Potomac, dated May 
17, 1865. 

CHARLES LEROY. 

Age 22. 

Enlisted from Hingham, served for the quota of the town, and 
was mustered as private in Co. G, Sept. 2, 1862. 

Mustered out June 2, 1865, by reason of close of the war. 
Term of enlistment two years and nine months. Was in nearly 
every engagement of the regiment. 

* JOHN S. NEAL. 
Co. G. 

LEVI CROWELL NEWCOMB. 

Born at Vinalhaven, Me., Oct. 4, 1813. 

Enlisted Aug. 13, 1862, as private in Co. G, and served for the 
quota of Hingham. Was connected with the Department of 
Defences for Washington, D.C., up to j€.n. i, 1863 ; afterwards 
stationed at Poolsville ; but becoming sick, and unfit for duty, 
he was transferred to the Army Square. Hospital at Washing- 
ton, where he was finally discharged from service, June 11, 
1863, on account of deafness and general disability. 

CHARLES HENRY POOLE. 

Age 1 8. 

Enlisted from Hingham, and returned by the selectmen as 
reckoned on the quota of the town. 

Mustered as private in Co. G, Sept, 2, 1862, and was dis- 
charged for disability Dec. 17, 1864. Term of service, two 
years and three months. 



THREE YEARS' MEN. 233 

BENJAMIN W. PROUTY. 
Age 34. 

Resident of South Scituate ; mustered Sept. 2, 1862, as private 

in Co. G ; served for the quota of Hingham. 

Mustered out on account of disability, Sept. 12, 1864, after a 
service of two years. Was sun-struck and disabled in the sum- 
mer of 1863, and for a time confined in Kent Hospital at Wash- 
ington, D.C. 

* ELIJAH PROUTY. 
Co. G. 

ISAAC PROUTY. 

Age 44. 

Resident of South Scituate; and Sept. 2, 1862, was mustered as 
private in Co. G; Sept. 7, 1863, transferred to Veteran 
Reserve Corps. 

WILLIAM PROUTY, Jun. 

Age 28. 

Resident of South Scituate, private in Co. G, and was mustered 
Sept. 2, 1862. Served for quota of Hingham. Mustered out 
June 2, 1865, by reason of close of the war, his whole period 
of service including two years and nine months. 

Mr. Prouty was a volunteer member of the Lincoln Light 
Infantry, and left Hingham for Fortress Monroe with the second 
detachment. May 18, 186 1. 

* JOSEPH SIMMONS. 
Co. G. 

* EDWARD A. F. SPEAR. 

Co. G. ' 

30 



234 HINGHAM IN THE CIVIL WAR. 

* THOMAS SPRAGUE. 
CO. G. 

SETH MELLEN SPRAGUE. 

Born in Hingham, Nov. i6, 1843. 
Enlisted at Hingham, Aug. 11, 1862, as private in Co. G. 

Mr. Sprague entered the service when but nineteen years of 
age, and, during the time for whicli he enlisted, was called to 
bear a full measure of the trials and exposures of a soldier's life. 
He was in the battles of Mine Run, Wilderness, Spottsylvania, 
North Anna, Tolopotomy, Bethesda Church, Petersburg, Weldon 
Railroad, Dabney's Mills, Gravelly Run, and Five Forks. 

Mustered out June 2, 1865, by reason of close of the war. 

ALONZO G. STOCKWELL. 

Born in Hingham, Sept. 11, 1840. 

Enlisted for the quota of Hingham, and was mustered as private 
in Co. G, Sept. 2, 1862. 

Mr. Stockwell was in the battle of the Wilderness, and others 
in which the regiment shared. During the engagement at Wel- 
don Railroad, he was severely wounded in the foot, and con- 
fined nearly five months in the hospital, a portion of the time 
being spent at City Point, Va., and at Bristol, Pa. In the 
autumn of 1864, he came home on a furlough ; and in June, 1865, 
absent from wound, he was honorably discharged from service 
by reason of close of the war. 

t 

CHARLES H. TISDALE. 

Age 29. 

Enlisted from Hingham for the quota of the town, and was mus- 
tered as private in Co. G, Sept. 2, 1862. 

Mustered out Nov, 4, 1862, by reason of disability. 



THREE YEARS' MEN. 235 

FRANKLIN JACOB TORREY. 

Born in Hingham, Oct. 19, 1835. 

Enlisted at Hingham, Sept. 2, 1862 ; was mustered as private in 
Co. G, and left the State for the seat of war Sept. 6, 
1862. 

His first engagement occurred at Brock Pike, May 5, 1864. 
The battle of Mine Run followed ; and, on the 7th, the march was 
made to Laurel Hill. In the battle which took place early on 
the following morning (Sunday, May 8), Mr. Torrey was severely 
wounded by a musket-ball. Being entirely disabled, he was 
removed to the Camden Hospital at Baltimore. After a short 
stay here, he was taken to New Haven, Conn. ; and lastly 
to the hospital in Pemberton Square, Boston, Mass., where he 
obtained his discharge by reason of disability, and was mus- 
tered out Dec. 10, 1864. Whole term of service two years and 
three months. 

* ALBERT WILDER. 
Co. G. 



2:! 6 HINGHAM IN THE CIVIL WAR. 



FORTIETH REGIMENT. 

The Fortieth Regiment was recruited at Camp Stanton. It 
was mustered into the service Sept. 5, left Massachusetts Sept. 
8, 1862, and was mustered out June 16, 1865. Of enlistments 
connected with Hingham, it included two only. 



PRIVATES. 

* JEREMIAH J. CORCORAN. 
•. Co. A. 

ENSIGN LINCOLN. 

Born in Hingham, Jan. 15, 1841. 

Enlisted in Co. I, at Sandwich, Mass., July 22, 1862, with the 
rank of private, and was mustered July 29, following, for three 
years' service. 

-He performed soldier's duty till January, 1863,. and then was 
detailed as baker and cook at brigade headquarters, for Brig.- 
Gen. Robert Cowdin and staff. 

On the march to Gettysburg, he was taken sick with intermit- 
tent fever, and sent to the U. S. Hospital at Frederick City, 
Md., where he remained till sent to convalescent camp at Alex- 
andria, Va., Dec. 20, 1863. On the nth of January, 1864, he 
received his discharge on surgeon's certificate of disability. 



THREE YEARS' MEN. 237 



FIFTY-FOURTH REGIMENT. 

This was the first colored regiment recruited in Massachusetts. 
It was mustered into service May 13, left the State May 28, 
1863, and was mustered out Aug. 20, 1865. 

The Fifty-fourth took an important part in the siege of 
Charleston, S.C., and had the advance at the assault on Fort 
Wagner. Besides these engagements, it was present at Olustee, 
James Island, Honey Hill, and Boykin's Mills. 

The enlistments from Hingham were the following : — 



CORPORAL 

DAVID HENRY CHAMPLIN. 

Born in Norwich, Conn., April iS, 1835, resident of Hingham. 

Enlisted at Taunton, Mass., Aug. 25, 1863, as private in Co. B, 
and was mustered at Long Island, Boston Harbor. Promoted 
corporal March i, 1864. 

With a small body of troops, he joined the regiment at 
Morris Island, Charleston Harbor, S. C. The last of January 
left for Hilton Head, and thence sailed with the expedition to 
attempt the capture of Jacksonville, Fla. Arriving at that place, 
the Fifty-fourth was the first to land. The fire of the pickets was 
received with unflinching bravery, and the enemy was driven 
before them. 

On the 20th occurred the battle of Olustee, where this regi- 
ment " made the reserve in the fight, and was the list to leave 
the field ; and it also covered the retreat." 

Returning to Jacksonville, the company had marched one 
hundred and twenty miles in one hundred and two hours. 

In the battle of Olustee, the fighting was continued from four 
o'clock of the afternoon until eight o'clock of the evening, with 
a total of seventy-nine killed and wounded. The regiment 
entered the fight with " three cheers for Massachusetts and seven 
dollars a month ! " 



238 HINGHAM IN THE CIVIL WAR. 

The next battle was at John's Island, and James Island, after 
which Corp. Champlin was stationed at Folly Island and other 
places in the vicinity of Charleston, S.C., performing garrison 
duty or skirmishing with the enemy, until the advent of peace. 

Mustered out Aug. 20, 1865. Whole term of service, two 
years. 

Up to September of 1864, no compensation for services had 
been received by tiie men of the Fifty-fourth. " During the sixteen 
months prior to this, the regiment had been seven times mus- 
tered for pay. Seven dollars per month had been tendered the 
men on each occasion, in the place of the thirteen dollars 
monthly pay of the white soldiers ; and on each occasion had the 
men refused to take it." But on the 28th of September, — pro- 
nounced by the adjutant-general " a memorable day in the history 
of the Fifty-fourth Regiment," — the United States acknowl- 
edged the men as " soldiers," and paid them, as such, thirteen 
dollars per month from the time of enlistment. 

PRIVATE- 
LOUIS LEGARD SIMPSON. 
Resident of Hingham, age 22. 

Enlisted Nqv. 25, 1863. Mustered in Co. G, Dec. .10, 1863. 
Wounded at Honey Hill, S.C., Dec, 10, 1864. Removed to 
hospital at Beaufort, and was there confined for six months. 
Mustered out May 25, 1865, by reason of disability caused by 
wound. 



THREE YEARS' MEN: 239 



FIFTY-FIFTH REGIMENT. 

This regiment was mustered into the service of the United 
States June 22, 1863, and left camp at Readville, Mass., on the 
morning of the 21st of July. 

Its service was in the Carolinas, where it was present at the 
siege of Charleston, and in the engagements at James Island 
and Honey Hill. Of those connected with Hingham, this regi- 
ment include4, — 

LIEUTENANTS. 

ALPHONSO MARSH. 
Born in Hingham in 1839, but resided at Fitchburg when commissioned. 

Enlisted as private in the Twenty-first Massachusetts Infantry, 
July 19, 1 86 1. Promoted second lieutenant, in the Fifty-fifth 
Massachusetts Infantry, Aug. 21, 1863 ; first lieutenant July 
9, 1864. Resigned Sept. 29, 1864. Has since resided at Phil- 
adelphia, and been in the emjaloy of the Pennsylvania Central 
Railroad Company. 

PETER NICHOLS SPRAGUE. 

Born in Hingham, Dec. 16, 1826. 

Sergeant in Co. I, Fourth Regiment, M. V. M., — Lincoln Light 
Irrfantry, — and was three months at Fortress Monroe and 
vicinity, April to July, 1861. 

Removing to Weymouth, he was commissioned, Aug. 20, 1864, 
as second lieutenant, Co. A, in the Fifty-fifth (colored) Regi- 
ment, M. V. I., three years. Sept.. 12 left for Hilton Head, 
where on the 26th he was mustered into service. 

During the winter he was employed in garrison and picket 
duty ; and he also took part in the engagement at James Island, 
besides joining the expedition under Gen. Potter to attempt a 
landing at Bull's Bay. 



240 ' HINGHAM IN THE CIVIL WAR. 

On the 19th of February, news was received of the evacuation 
of Charleston, and the next day the Fifty-fifth entered the city. 
Boats from the fleet had landed, and a few soldiers had come 
over ; but the Fifty-fifth was the first body of troops that 
entered the town after its evacuation. 

As they moved up King Street, a voice from an upper window 
called to know who they were. On being told that they were 
the Fifty-fifth from Massachusetts, he replied '' God bless Gov. 
Andrew ! " 

From this time Lieut. Sprague was engaged in numerous 
expeditions at various points in the vicinity of Charleston, 
doing guard-duty, constructing bridges, &c., and on the 15th of 
May was promoted first lieutenant, the commission to date from 
April I. 

On the 5 th of June, Companies A and I were ordered to leave 
Orangeburg for Fort Motte, and moved the day following. 
Remaining at this post till about Aug. 20, Lieut. Sprague 
returned with the company to Orangeburg, and thence to 
Charleston. On the 29th of August, after the close of the war, 
he was mustered out of service at Mount Pleasant, S.C, and 
finally discharged at Gallop's Island, Boston Harbor, Sept. 25, 
1865. 

PRIVATE 

JOHN T. TALBOT. 
Enlisted from Hingham, age 36. 

Mustered into Co. B, Oct. 8, 1864, as private, and was mustered 
out after close of the war, Aug. 29, 1865. 



THREE YEARS' MEN. 



241 



FIFTY-SIXTH REGIMENT. 

This regiment was organized at Readville, Mass., by Col. 
Charles E. Griswold. It was mustered into the service of the 
United States Feb. 25, left the State March 21, 1864, and was 
mustered out July 12, 1865. 

It was present in the following engagements : Wilderness, 
Spottsylvania, North Anna, Cold Harbor, Petersburg, Weldon 
Railroad, Poplar Spring Church, Hatcher's Run, and siege of 
Petersburg. 

Of those connected wuth the town of Hingham, the Fifty- 
sixth included the following : — 

CORPORAL 

* GEORGE BAILEY. 
Co. I. 

PRIVATE - 

GEORGE A. CLAPP. 

Enrolled from Hinsiham, asfe 28. 

Mustered into Co. H, Jan. 27, 1864; mustered out by close of 
war, July 12, 1865. 



242 HINGHAM IN THE CIVIL WAR. 



FIFTY-SEVENTH REGIMENT. 

The Fifty-seventh regiment was organized in Worcester 
County, during the autumn of 1863 and the winter and spring 
of 1864. It was mustered into the service April 6 ; left Massa- 
chusetts April 18, 1864, and was mustered out July 30, 1865. 

Served in the Department of Virginia. In its list of engage- 
ments are the Wilderness, Spottsylvania, North Anna, Cold 
Harbor, Petersburg, Weldon Railroad, Poplar Spring Church, 
and Hatcher's Run. 

So far as known, the following were the only enlistments from 
Hingham. 

- MUSICIAN 

EDWARD ^O. GRAVES. 

Resident of Hingham, age 44. 

First in Co. K, Twentieth Regiment ; enlisted Jan. 14, 1864, in 
Co. C of the Fifty-ninth Regiment, and transferred to the 
Fifty-seventh, Co. C, June i, 1865 ; June 22, 1865, discharged 
for disability. 

PRIVATE 

JOHN WELSH. 

Enrolled from Hingham, age 20. 

Enlisted as private in Co. G, May 16, 1864, and transferred 
June I, 1865, to Co. G of the Fifty-seventh Regiment; mus- 
tered out July 30, 1865, by reason of close of the war. 



THREE YEARS' MEN. 243 



FIFTY-EIGHTH REGIMENT. 

The formation of this regiment was commenced in the autumn 
of 1863, and eight companies were organized April 25, 1864. 

These companies left Readville April 28, under command of 
Lieut.-Col. John C. Whiton, for Alexandria, Va,, which they 
reached Saturday, April 30. Of enlistments of natives or resi- 
dents of Hingham, the number included in the Fifty-eighth was 
limited. 

The regiment was in active service for nearly fifteen months. 
The nature of this service the following statement of the killed 
and wounded will show : — 

Killed, eight commissioned officers and fifty-four enlisted 
men. Died of wounds, one commissioned officer, and forty-two 
men. Fifteen commissioned officers were wounded, and two 
hundred and eighty-four enlisted men ; making the total of 
wounded two hundred and ninety-nine. 

The regiment was mustered out July 14, 1865. Further par- 
ticulars of the service rendered will be found in the annexed 
record of Col. Whiton, who, as will be seen, also served nine 
months with the Forty-third Regiment in the Department 
of the Carolinas. 

COLONEL 

JOHN CHADVVICK WHITON. 

Born in Hingham, Aug. 22, 1828. 

Early in life Col. Whiton removed to Boston, and at the time 
of the outbreak of the civil war was in command of the " Tigers," 
one of the most noted and best disciplined of the military orga- 
nizations of that city. As captain of Co. A, of the Second 
Battalion, M. V. M., he was with the first garrison at Fort Warren, 
Boston Harbor, remaining there from the 29th of April to May 
21, 1 86 1, when the battalion was relieved. 

On the 27th of August, 1862, as captain of the same battal- 
ion, went into camp at Readville, for the purpose of recruiting a 
regiment, having command of camp and recruits. This regi- 
ment was designated the Forty-third, M. V. M., nine months, 



244 



HINGHAM IN THE CIVIL WAR. 



and left Massachusetts Oct. 24, for the Department of North 
Carolina, where the full term of enlistment was spent. Col. 
Whiton was here present in the expedition to Goldsboro', 
engaged at Kinston, Whitehall, Springbank Bridge, Blount's 
Creek, and also at Little Washington ; in addition to which the 
regiment performed its full measure of garrison duty, construc- 
tion of roads, building of fortifications, &c. 

At the expiration of his term of enlistment, he left with the 
reofiraent for Fortress Monroe, and thence embarked for Balti- 
more. Some disaffection was here manifested on the part of the 
soldiers at the delay in mustering out ; and an order was issued, 
" leaving it optional with the men to go to the front or return 
home." It was a season of peculiar peril, and the need of the 
additional strength was urgent. Two hundred and three officers 
and men, including Col. Whiton and all those from Hingham, 
voted "to go to the front." Lieut.-Col. Whiton was in command ; 
and proceeding at once to Sandy Hook, the regiment remained 
at this point until July 18, when all embarked for Boston, and 
were mustered out at Readville on the 30th, complimented for 
the faithful manner in which their duties had been performed, 
and commended for their bravery and patriotism. 

Oct. 23, 1863, Col. Whiton was appointed superintendent of 
recruiting for Plymouth County, and served in this capacity 
until April of 1864. 

During the winter of 1863-4 the Fifty-eighth Regiment, 
M. V. I., three years, had been organizing at Readville ; and on 
the 28th of April, under the command of Lieut.-Col. Whiton, 
left Massachusetts for Alexandria and the Department of 
Virginia. An active service followed. In eight days from the 
time of leaving home they were engaged with the enemy ; and 
from this time until August there were but few days when the 
Fifty-eighth was not under fire. In the list of engagements are 
included the Wilderness, Spottsylvania, North Anna, Tolopoto- 
my, Bethesda Church, Cold Harbor, and the siege and capture 
of Petersburg. 

At the battle of Bethesda Church Col. Whiton was struck in 
the side by a musket-ball, which fractured one of his ribs, and 
was the cause of a brief confinement. 



THREE YEARS' MEN. 



245 



After the engagement at Preble's Farm, nearly all of the regi- 
ment had either been killed, wounded, or taken prisoners. Of 
those who actually participated in this battle, only one officer 
and about ten men escaped. The Fifty-eighth appeared to be 
almost extinct. Additional recruits, the return to duty of the 
convalescent, as well as of escaped prisoners, afterwards 
swelled the number to three hundred or more. 

At the evacuation of Petersburg the regiment marched over 
the enemy's works, through the city, and joined in the pursuit 
of Lee's retreating army. 

On the loth of May, after the news of the surrender of Gen. 
Lee, the return march was commenced. 

The Fifty-eighth was present in the grand review at Wash- 
ington, D.C., on the 23d of May ; and July 15, broke camp and 
returned to Readville, Mass., where it was regularly mustered 
out of service, July 26, 1865, by reason of close of the war. 

SERGEANT 

WILLIAM M. CARTER. 

Enrolled from Hingham, age 23. 

Co. H. 

Mustered April 18, 1864; discharged July 14, 1865, by reason 
of close the war. 

In the battle at Cold Harbor, Serg. Carter was wounded, and 
came home, where for some months he remained disabled. On 
being mustered out, he had the hearty commendation of those in 
command. 

PRIVATES. 

JOHN McDonald. 

Enrolled from Hingham, age 44. 

Co. A. 
Mustered Jan. 14, 1864. 



2^6 HINGHAM IN THE CIVIL WAR. 

JAMES L. LITCHFIELD. 

Enrolled from Hingham, age 22. 

Co. D. 

Mustered March i, 1864. 



FIFTY-NINTH REGIMENT. 

The Fifty-ninth was the last of the regiments raised for a 
service of three j^ears. It was mustered by companies ; left the 
State April 26, 1864, and was mustered out July 30, 1865. 

Its list of engagements includes the Wilderness, Spottsyl- 
vania, North Anna, Cold Harbor, Petersburg, Weldon Railroad, 
Poplar Spring Church, Hatcher's Run, and Fort Stedman. 

Among its enlistments were the following : — 



CORPORAL 

ALFRED TYLER. 

Enrolled from Hingham, age 22. 

Co. F. 

Mustered Feb. 20. 1864; discharged by order of War Depart- 
ment, June 2, 1865. Town records say he resided at Bath, 
Me., and was a shoemaker by trade. 

MUSICIAN 

t 

EDWARD O. GRAVES. 

Co. C. 
Transferred June i, 1865, to Fifty-seventh Regiment, Co. C. 



THREE YEARS' MEN. 247 

PRIVATES. 

WILLIAM C. TORREY. 

Born in Hingham, age 36. 

Enlisted from Dedham, as private in Co. G, and was mustered 
March 4, 1864. 

JOHN WELCH. 
Enrolled from Hingham. 

Co. G. 

Transferred June i, 1865, to Co. G, Fifty-seventh Regiment. 











CHAPTER XII. 



THREE YEARS MEN CONTINUED, 



First Regiment Heav)- Artillery — Third Do. — First Battery Light Artillery — Third Do. ■ 
Tenth Do. — List of Men in Regiments of Artillery and Batteries. 



FIRST REGIMENT HEAVY ARTILLERY. 

THE basis of this regiment was the Fourteenth Regiment 
Infantry. It was mustered into the service of the United 
States, July 5, and left Massachusetts July 7, 1861. 

By order from the War Department, it was changed to a heavy 
artillery regiment, Jan. i, 1862. 

In 1863 the regiment re-enlisted for an additional term of 
three years, and was mustered out Aug. 16, 1865, making its 
complete period of service more than four years. 

Its record includes the following engagements, viz. : Spottsyl- 
vania. North Anna, Tolopotomy, Cold Harbor, Petersburg, Straw- 
berry Plains, Deep Bottom, Poplar Spring Church, Boydton 
Road, Hatcher's Run, Duncan's Run, and Vaughan Road. Of 
enlistments connected with Hingham, it included the follow- 



ing 



CORPORAL 



WEBSTER A. CUSHING. 



Mustered in Co. D, Aug. i, 1862. 
by reason of close of the war. 



Mustered out April 2, 1865, 



PRIVATES. 

WILLIAM CARTER. 

Age 43. 
Enrolled from Hingham. Member of Co. G, and mustered Sept. 



THREE YEARS' MEN. 249 

2^, 1864. Discharged May 3, 1865. Enlisted for one year. 
Transferred from Fourteenth Regiment Infantry. 



ANTON TAPP. 

Age 35. 

EnHsted from Hingham for the quota of the town. Private in 
Co. L. Mustered Dec. 31, i86r. Re-enKsted Jan. i, 1864, 
Mustered out June 7, 1865, by reason of close of the war. 
Transferred from Fourteenth Regiment Infantry, where he 
was private in Co. L. 



THIRD REGIMENT HEAVY ARTILLERY. 

The Third Regiment of Heavy Artillery was formed from 
the Third, Sixth, Seventh, Eighth, Ninth, Tenth, Eleventh, 
Twelfth, Thirteenth, P'ourteenth, Fifteenth, and Sixteenth Unat- 
tached Companies of Heavy Artillery. 

The eight companies first mentioned were originally raised 
for the coast defence of the State of Massachusetts, and for a 
time were so employed. 

The new orgamizatiori was directed by order of the War 
Department ; and the regiment '^as forwarded to Washington 
in the autumn of 1864. 

From this time to the expiration of its term of enlistment, 
it was stationed at different points in the vicinity, for the defence 
of the national capital. 

The regiment included twenty enlistments from Hingham. 
Of these, seventeen were members of Co. A, originally Third 
Unattached. 

32 



2^6 HINGHAM IN THE CIVIL WAR. 

MAJOR 

LYMAN BARNES WHITON. 

Born in Hingham, Jan. 17, 1834. 

Was first corporal, then sergeant, in the Lincoln Light Infantry; 
left Hingham with the first detachment, April 17, 1861, and 
was with the company three months at Fortress Monroe and 
vicinity. Mustered out at expiration of term of service, July 
22, 1861. 

Commissioned second lieutenant in Co. I, First Battalion 
Infantry, M. V. Promoted first lieutenant May 26, 1862, then 
of Thirty-second Regiment. Resigned on account of disability, 
July 20, 1862. Commissioned second lieutenant in Third Unat- 
tached Company tfeavy Artillery, Nov. 26, 1862. Promoted cap- 
tain, Dec. 31, 1862, and Sept. 8, 1864, commissioned major in 
the Third Regiment, Mass. Heavy Artillery. Sept. 18, 1865, 
mustered out by reason of expiration of term of service. 

When the Lincoln Light Infantry was called into service at 
the commencement of the war. Major (then Corporal) Whiton 
took an active part in obtaining volunteers to fill the ranks, and 
in making the necessary arrangements for joining the Fourth 
Regiment in Boston. The time for preparation was short ; the 
needs of the hour pressing ; and it was through the hearty co- 
operation of Corp. Whiton and another ofificer, now deceased, 
that the company was enabled to appear with as full ranks as it 
did at the time of departure. 

Early in December, 1861, Major (at that time Sergeant) 
Whiton opened a recruiting-ofBce in Hingham, at Oasis Hall, 
for the purpose of obtaining enlistments for a company then 
'being raised under Capt. Cephas C. Bumpus. Within ten days 
from the time the office was opened, fifty-seven recruits were 
procured ; and, before the month ended, all were sworn into the 
United States service at Fort Warren, as members of Co. E, of 
the First Battalion Infantry, M. V., afterwards Thirty-second 
Regiment, M. V. I. This, undoubtedly, was the most successful 
recruiting in Hingham during the war. 

At the draft-riot in Boston, July 14, 1863, Major (then Cap- 



THREE YEARS' MEN. 



251 



tain) Whiton and his company came up from Fort Independence 
with a company of the Eleventh Infantry U. S. Regulars, for duty 
in support of law and order ; the battalion being under com- 
mand of Captain Whiton. The night was passed on guard in 
the city. Tlie following night the company, with other troops, 
was ordered to the arsenal at Watertown, to protect that place 
against an apprehended attack ; the entire force being in 
charge of Capt. Whiton. 

While in Washington, D.C., his military record was closely 
identified with the history of the Third Regiment. A portion 
of the time, however, he was detached for special duty. Serv- 
ing as judge advocate, on a general court-martial, he was highly 
complimented through special orders issued from headquarters. 



CAPTAIN 

EDWIN THOMAS. 

Born in Hingham, age 26. 

On the 28th of February, i852, enlisted at Boston as private in 
the First Unattached Company Heavy Artillery. In January 
of 1863 was promoted second lieutenant; May 25, 1863, 
first lieutenant; and Sept. 8, 1864, captain. 

Up to the time of his first promotion, he remained with the 
company in which he originally enlisted. By virtue of his first 
commission he was transferred to the Third Unattached Com- 
pany Heavy Artillery ; and here he remained until promoted 
captain, when he was anain transferred to the Ninth Company 
Unattached Artillery (so designated at the time of its formation). 
Previous to his appointment as captain of this company, it had 
been consolidated with others, and was recognized as Co. K of 
the Third Regiment Heavy Artillery, M. V. 

Capt. Thomas enlisted for the quota of the town of Wey- 
mouth ; resigned, and was mustered out at Washington, D.C., 
June 25, 1865, having been in service three years and four 
months. 



252 H INGHAM IN THE CIVIL WAR. 

LIEUTENANT 

EDWIN F. TIRRELL. 

Resident of Hingham, age 26. 

Enlisted from Weymouth, as first sergeant in Co. B, and was 
mustered May 25, 1864. Promoted second lieutenant. 

SERGEANT 

FRANCIS K. MEADE. 

Age 43- 

Enlisted at Hingham, and Dec. 30, 1863, was mustered as 
quartermaster sergeant in Co. A. Mustered out Sept. 18, 
1865, by reason of expiration of term of service. 

CORPORALS. 

FRANZ BURHENNE. 

Born in Germany. Thirty-two years of age, and at the time of 
entering the service was in the employ of Mr. Alfred Loring, 
at South Hingham. 

Mustered Dec. 30, 1863, Was corporal in Co, A ; mustered 
out after the close of the war, Sept. 18, 1865. 

ISAIAH WILDER LORING. 

Born in Hingham, Nov. 10, 1832. 

Enlisted at Hingham, and Feb. 29, 1864, was mustered at Fort 
Independence, Boston Harbor ; was corporal in Co. A ; mus- 
tered out Sept. 18, 1865. 

ARTIFICER 

JOHN BRIGGS BATCHELDER. 

Born in Baldwin, Me., Sept. 19, 1829; enlisted from Hingham, 
Dec. 2, 1863, and served for the quota of the town. Artificer 



THREE YEARS' MEN. 253 

in Co. A, and was mustered Dec. 29, 1863. Mustered out 
after the close of the war, Sept. 18, 1865. 

PRIVATES. ^ 

JONATHAN B. ACKERMAN. 

Age n. 

Enlisted from Hingham, and included in the town's quota ; mus- 
tered Dec. 30, 1863, as private in Co. A. Mustered out after 
the close of the war, Sept. 18, 1865. 

FIELDER BOTTING, Jun. 

Born in Hingham, age 21. 

Enlisted for the quota of Hingham, and was mustered as private 
in Co. F, originally Tenth Unattached, Sept. 16, 1863 ; mus- 
tered out by reason of disability, Aug. 26, 1864. 

GEORGE ANTHONY CHUBBUCK. 

Born in Scituate, July 9, 1844. 

Enlisted at Boston, May 16, 1863, as private in the Third Unat- 
tached Company, Massachusetts Heavy Artillery; July 5, 1864, 
transferred to Navy, which see for further particulars of his 
record. 

JOSHUA CROSBY, Jun. 

Born in Cohasset, age 23. 

Enlisted from Hingham, and Sept. i, 1864, was mustered as 
private in Co. A; mustered out June 14, 1865, by reason of 
expiration of term of service. 

FRANCIS MAYHEW. 

Born in Hingham, age 18. 

Enlisted from Hingham ; and mustered as private in Co. A, Sept. 
10, 1864. Discharged June 14, 1865, by reason of close of 
the war. Enlisted for one year. 



2^4 H INGHAM IN THE CIVIL WAR. 

DANIEL H. MILLER. 

Age 35. 

Private in Co. A ; mustered Jan. 10. 1863, and discharged April 
24, 1863, by reason of disability. Served for quota of 
Hingham. 

LEVI HANSCOM DOW. 

Born in Boston, Oct. 3, 1840. 

First, a volunteer member of the Lincoln Light Infantry, Co. 
I, Fourth Regiment, M. V. M. Left Hingham May 18, 1861, 
and was three months at Fortress Monroe and vicinity. 

Second, enlisted July 7, 1863, as private in Co. E, Third Regi- 
ment Massachusetts Heavy Artillery ; and was mustered out 
Sept. 18, 1865, by reason of close of the war. 

Third, re-enlisted Nov. 11, 1867, for three years, in the Seven- 
teenth Regiment, Co. E, Capt. Edward Collins, of the regular 
army of the United States, as artificer, and was mustered out 
Nov. II, 1870, by reason of expiration of term of enlistment. 

In the Army of the Potomac, Mr. Dow was employed in field 
and garrison duty, and shared in the engagements at Spottsylva- 
nia, Wilderness, Cold Harbor, North Anna, Petersburg, and in 
other battles of minor importance. 

Afterwards, while in the regular army, was stationed for a 
time in Texas, and next in Dacotah Territory, engaged in border 
service. 

JOSEPH HENRY NOYES. 

Born in Boston, May 7, 1835. 

Died May 18, 1872, at Peabody, Kansas. 

Previous to the time of the rebellion, Mr. Noyes was connect- 
ed with the United States Army, and with the First Regiment 
Mounted Rifles spent five years in frontier service in New Mex- 
ico, engaged in subduing the Indians of the Territory. 

After the outbreak of the civil war, and having refused a 
lieutenant's commission tendered him in the rebel service, he 
enlisted from Hingham Dec. 4, 1863, in the Third Unattached 



THREE YEARS' MEN. 



!55 



Company Heavy Artillery, afterwards Co, A, and was mustered 
at Fort Independence, Boston Harbor. 

He was on duty in the defences of Washington until mus- 
tered out of service at Fort Totten, Sept. i8, 1865, by "reason of 
the close of the war. 

It is just to add, that the discharge papers of the deceased 
from the regular service of the United States bear the unsoli- 
cited testimonial of the officer in command to his character as a 
good soldier, and commending him for bravery and fidelity. 

GEORGE PEACOCK. 

Age 20. 

Private in Co. A, and enlisted from Hingham ; mustered Sept. 
28, 1864, and discharged June 14, 1865, by reason of close 
of the war. Enlisted for one year. 

GEORGE E. RICHARDSON. 

Age 25. 

Enrolled from Boston, and served for the quota of Hingham ; 
mustered as private in Co. A, Jan. 10, 1863 ; transferred to 
Navy April 15, 1864. 

JOSEPH ROLLINS. 
Age 27. 
Enlisted for quota of Hingham; mustered Dec. 10, 1862. 

CHARLES EDWARD SPURR. 
Born in Lowell, Mass., June 3, 1833. 

Enlisted at Boston as private in the Third Unattached Company 
of Heavy Artillery, Nov. 25, 1863. Was clerk in the hospital 
at Fort Independence, Boston Harbor; discharged at Fort 
Berry, Va., July 1 1, 1864 ; served on the quota of Hingham. 



256 HINGHAM IN THE CIVIL WAR. 

AARON D. SWAN. 

Age 40. 

Enrolled from Hingham, and returned by the selectmen in the 
list of persons serving on the quota of the town; mustered 
Aug. 27, 1864, in Co. M, and discharged June 17, 1865 ; en- 
listed for one year. 

HENRY WHITMAN. 

Age 21. 

Enlisted from Hingham, and mustered as private in Co. A, Dec. 
20, 1862. 



FIRST BATTERY LIGHT ARTILLERY. 

The First Battery Light Artillery, also designated as Porter's 
Battery, was mustered at Camp Cameron. It left Massachusetts 
Oct. 3, i86r, and was mustered out Oct. 19, 1864. 

Connected with the Army of the Potomac, it was in nearly all 
the noted engagements that occurred in the Department of Vir- 
ginia during the civil war, from the battle at West Point to those 
of Petersburg and Fisher's Hill. 

It contained one enlistment from Hingham, viz. : — 

PRIVATE 

JAMES RUSSELL FRENCH. 

Born in Hingham, Oct. 23, 1S16. 

Enlisted at Boston Aug. 28, 1861, and was mustered at Camp 
Cameron the 6th of September following. 

This battery was the first artillery organization raised in 
Massachusetts for three years. It joined the Army of the Poto- 
mac early in 1862, and was engaged in the following battles and 



THREE YEARS' MEN. 



257 



skirmishes, viz. : West Point, Mechanicsville, Gaines' Mill, 
Charles City Cross-Roads, Malvern Hill, Second Bull Run, 
Crampton's Pass, South Mountain, Antietam, Fredericksburg, 
Chancellorsville, Gettysburg, Sander's House, Wilderness, 
Spottsylvania, North Anna River, Cold Harbor, and in front of 
Petersburg. It served under Gen. Sheridan in his advance up 
the Shenandoah Valley, and took part with the Sixth Corps in 
the battles of Winchester and Fisher's Hill. 

Private French participated in all these engagements. He 
was not absent from duty a day ; and his record for bravery and 
power of endurance stands among the first on our list of soldiers 
who were natives of Hingham. He was mustered cut Oct. 19, 
1864, by reason of expiration of term of enlistment, having 
served upwards of three years. 



THIRD BATTERY LIGHT ARTILLERY. 

This battery was mustered into the service of the United 
States Oct. 5, 1861, left Massachusetts, Oct. 7, and was mus- 
tered out Sept. 16, 1864. 

The report of the adjutant-general states, that, connected with 
the Army of the Potomac, it took part in twenty-four engage- 
ments. 

Among the enlistments was, — 

GEORGE FRANKLIN TOWER. 

Born in Hingham, April 13, 1834. 
Enlisted at Boston July, 1861, and was mustered Sept. 5. 

After the seven-days' battle, was . taken sick, and transferred 
to the Harewood Hospital ; from which, after a confinement of 
two months, he was honorably discharged Oct. 30, 1862, having 
been in the service fourteen months. 

Mr. Tower was in all the engagements with the Army of the 
Potomac, until the battle of Gettysburg. 

33 



258 



HINGHAM IN THE CIVIL WAR. 



TENTH BATTERY LIGHT ARTILLERY. 



* HOSEA ORCUTT BARNES. 



List of men in regiments of artillery and in batteries 



Jonathan B. Ackerman. 
Hosea O. Barnes. 
John B. Batchelder. 
Fielder Botting, jun. 
Franz Burhenne. 
William Carter. 
George A. Chubbuck. 
Joshua Crosby, jun. 
Webster A. Gushing. 
Levi H. Dow. 
James R. French. 
Isaiah W. Loring. 
Francis Mayhew. 

Lyman B. 



Francis K. Meade. 
Daniel H. Miller. 
Joseph H. Noyes. 
George Peacock. 
George E. Richardson. 
Joseph Rollins. 
Charles E. Spurr. 
Aaron D. Swan. 
Anton Tapp. 
Edwin Thomas. 
Edwin F. Tirrell. 
George F. Tower. 
Henry Whitman. 
Whiton. 





CHAPTER XIII. 

THREE years' MEN CONCLUDED. 

First Regiment of Cavalry — Second Regiment Do. — Fourth Regiment Do. — Fifth Do. — 

List of Men in Cavalry Service. 

FIRST REGIMENT OF CAVALRY. 

BUGLER. 

WILLIAM ALDEN DAGGETT. 

Born in Randolph, Jan. 5, 1846; resident of Hingham. 

Was three months at Fortress Monroe, in Co. C, Fourth Regi- 
ment, M. V. M., Capt. Bumpus of Braintree. Afterwards 
enlisted as bugler in Co. K of the First Mass. Cavalry, for 

■ three years. Mustered Sept. 17, i86r. .Transferred to 
Fourth Mass. Cavalry, Co. K ; mustered out at expiration of 
term of enlistment, Sept. 14, 1864. 

* CHARLES DAMON KILBURN. 
CO. B. 



SECOND REGIMENT OF CAVALRY. 

According to the report of the Adjutant-general of Massa- 
chusetts, this regiment was mustered into the service by com- 
panies, at dates varying from January to April, 1863. The first 



26o HINGHAM IN THE CIVIL WAR. 

detachment left Massachusetts Feb. 12, 1863, and the main body 
in the following May. Mustered out July 20, 1865. 

Beginning with South Anna Bridge, it was present in twenty- 
six battles, including Fort Stevens, Poolsville, Opequan, Win- 
chester, Cedar Creek, White Oak Road, Five Forks, and others. 
The enlistments from Hingham were, — 



PRIVATES. 

THOMAS T. BARNES. 

Age 34. 

CO. B. 

Was mustered Jan. 13, 1863. Discharged by reason of disability, 
Jan. 2, 1864. Enlisted from Hingham, and included in the 
town's quota. 

EBEN HART. 
Age 19. 

Enrolled from Hingham, and Oct. 24, 1864, was mustered in Co. 
L. Discharged July 17, 1865, by reason of close of the war. 

JOHN Mclaughlin. 

Age 21. 



"■fs^ 



Enlisted from Hingham, and served on the town's quota. Mus- 
tered Feb, 25, 1864; and May 18, 1865, discharged foi dis- 
ability. 



THREE YEARS' MEN. 26 1 



FOURTH REGIMENT OF CAVALRY. 

This regiment was organized by special order from the War 
Department, and was composed of the Independent Battalion, 
formerly Third Battalion, First Regiment of Cavalry, M. V., 
and two new battalions recruited in Massachusetts. 

At the time of its organization, the First Battalion, Major 
Stevens, was stationed in South Carolina. 

The Second Battalion left the State March 20, 1864, and 
the Third, April 23, 1864. 

With full complement of men, the regiment consisted of 
twelve squadrons, each one hundred strong, and was fully re- 
cruited March i, 1864. 

A portion of the regiment was present in the engagements at 
Gainesville, Fla., Drury's Bluff, and also in several of the bat- 
tles before Petersburg and Richmond. 

Mustered out Nov. 14, 1865. 

So far as known, the regiment included nineteen enlistments 
connected with Hingham, as follows : — 



MAJOR 

EDWARD TRACY BOUVE. 
Born in Hingham, Aug. 14, 1841. 

Enlisted, and mustered as second lieutenant in Co. G, Thirty- 
second Regiment, M. V. I., at Boston, June 30, 1862. Pro- 
moted first lieutenant Sept. i, 1862, and was in active service 
in the Army of the Potomac from July until attacked with 
typho-malarial fever ; was then sent to the U. S. military hos- 
pital at Point Lookout, Md. Discharged Dec. 29, 1862, for 
disability. 

With returning health, Lieut. Bouve re-enlisted, and was 
appointed captain in the Fourth Regiment, Mass. Cavalry, Jan, 
22, 1864. 

He was in the Army of the James, and shared its fortunes 



262 HINGHAM IN THE CIVIL WAR. 

from April, 1864, to April, 1865, participating in the battles of 
Fredericksburg, sieges of Petersburg and Richmond, guerilla 
fights at Cove River, Unionville, and various other places. He 
was promoted major in the Twenty-sixth Regiment, New York 
Cavalry, commanding the Mass. Battalion of the regiment, Feb. 
28, 1865. 

From April to July, 1865, he was stationed on the New York 
frontiers, in command of the posts of Champlain and Malone, as 
a protection against rebel raiders from Canada. 

Discharged July 7, 1865, on account of the regiment being 
' disbanded. 

LIEUTENANT 

BENJAMIN THOMAS. 

Born in Hingham, March 14, 1832. 

In November, 1863, Mr. Thomas received an appointment as 
recruiting-officer ; and, in the following December, was commis- 
sioned second lieutenant. Located at the time in Boston, he 
continued the work of enlistment ; and, being quite successful, 
was commissioned Jan. i, 1864, as first lieutenant, and assigned 
to the Fourth Mass. Cavalry as quartermaster. 

In April, 1864, with the regiment, was ordered to report to 
Gen. Oilman, then in command of the Department of the South, 
with headquarters at Hilton Head, and three days aftep again 
embarked under orders to report at Fortress Monroe. His next 
destination was City Point, for the purpose of co-operating, 
under Gen. Butler, with all the armies of Virginia, in the " on to 
Richmond " movement of that year. Being the advance guard 
to City Point, the duties were numerous and the labor severe. 
Mr. Thomas, as quartermaster, was required to be constantly 
on the move. Besides being responsible for the supply of 
rations for men and horses, and other material for the general 
prosecution of the war, a further duty was imposed as " ord- 
nance officer," by appointment of the colonel commanding. 

Soon after there came an acceptable change, in being detailed 
as A. A. O. M. of the Tenth Army Corps, under Gen. Terry. 
Here he continued his labors until, by order of Gen. Butler, the 
corps was disintegrated, and united with others. 



THREE YEARS' MEN. 



263 



Following this movement, Quartermaster Thomas, with other 
staff-officers, was ordered to report to Gen. Weitzel, who had 
just been placed in command of the Twenty-fifth Corps, com- 
posed of twenty-five thousand colored troops. Some disaffection 
was created with respect to the classing of white troops with 
colored ; but good feelings had the ascendency, and better judg- 
ment prevailed. Mr. Thomas affirms, that, during his entire 
experience, he found neither better nor braver men. 

In November and December of 1864, he aided in fitting out 
the noted Fort Fisher expedition under Gen. Butler, the result 
of which is well known. At the close of the year, he resigned 
his situation on account of repeated domestic affliction. 

Mr. Thomas retired from the service, having acceptably per- 
formed his multiplied and often perplexing duties. 



LIEUTENANT 

THOMAS HICKEY. 

Born in Hingham, Jan. 14, 1841. 

Enlisted at Waltham, Mass., and was mustered as private in Co. 
M, First Regiment Cavalry, M. V., Sept. 23, 1861. 

Re-enlisting at Hilton Head, S.C., Jan. 28, 1864, on the quota 
of Hingham, he was transferred the i6th of April following to 
Co. M, Fourth Regiment Cavalry, M. V., and on the same 
day promoted successively to rank of corporal, sergeant, and 
color-sergeant, and subsequently appointed second lieutenant, 
his commission dating from Aug. 9, 1865. 

Lieut. Hickey's military career was an eventful one. After 
sharing the dangers of many sanguinary engagements with the 
enemy at various points in South Carolina and Florida, including 
the battles of James Island, Olustee, and Three Mile Run, the 
regiment was divided, and several companies, including the one 
to which Lieut Hickey belonged, were ordered to Virginia, where 
they were attached to the Army of the James River, and took 
part in the contests in front of Petersburg. 

Late at night, April 5, 1865, Col. Washburn of the Fourth 



264 HINGHAM IN THE CIVIL WAR. 

Regiment received orders to proceed with a small force of caval- 
ry and two regiments of infantry, and destroy High Bridge, at 
that time of great importance to the army of Gen. Lee, then on 
the retreat from Richmond. It was a hazardous expedition, and 
its immediate results disastrous ; but "it was to the sharpness of 
that fight," says one of Lee's staff to Gen. Ord, " that the cutting 
off of Lee's army at Appomattox Court House was probably 
due." So fierce were the charges of Col. Washburn's men, and 
so determined their fighting, that Gen. Lee received the impres- 
sion that they must be supported by a large part of the army, and 
that his retreat was cut off. 

An officer of another cavalry regiment, in giving an account 
of this engagement, says, " In that handful of heroes was one 
among the enlisted. Color-sergeant Thomas Hickey, towards 
whom the heart of every man in the regiment thrills with grati- 
tude to this day, not alone for the bravery with which he bore 
the standard through the thickest of the fight, but because, when 
all hope of victory was gone, he had the presence of mind to so 
utterly destroy it before he was surrounded and taken, that the 
touch of rebel hands never polluted its blue folds." 

Just before Lieut. Hickey was captured, he dismounted from 
his horse in a valley, and, taking the regimental colors, made 
haste to reach a neighboring cabin, hotly pursued by rebel cav- 
alry. Gaining access to the dwelling, amidst a shower of bullets, 
he immediately thrust the standard into the fire and destroyed 
it. He was at once made prisoner, and taken with Lee's army 
in its retreat. 

He was deprived of most of his clothing, and received for 
rations but half a pint of Indian meal per day, which he was 
obliged to eat uncooked. Four days after his capture, he was 
released by the surrender of Lee's army to the national troops 
under Gen. Grant. 

Lieut. Hickey was in the service four years and about two 
months, and was discharged at Richmond, Va., Nov. 14, 1865, by 
reason of close of the war. 



THREE YEARS' MEN. 265 

SERGEANTS. 

FRANK H. OILMAN. 

Age 23. 

Sergeant in Co. B, enlisted from Hingham, and was mustered 
Dec. 28, 1863; discharged Nov. 14, 1865, by reason of close 
of the war. 

ARVANDER MERROW. 

Age 22. 

Enlisted from Hingham. Was sergeant in Co. B, and mustered 
Dec. 28, 1863 ; discharged Nov. 14, 1865, by reason of close 
of the war. 

CORPORAL 

* JAMES G. RAYMOND. 
Co. D. 

MUSICIANS. 

THOMAS CLONEY. 

Age 18. 

Bugler in Co. F, and enlisted from Hingham ; mustered Jan, 27, 
1864, and discharged Nov. 14, 1865, by reason of close of 
the war. 

WILLIAM A. DAGGETT. 

Resident of Hingham. See First Regiment Cavalry. 
PRIVATES. 

ORIETES L. BAILEY. 

Enlisted from Weymouth, age 18. 

Mustered as private in Co. C, Jan. 6, 1864, and discharged Nov. 
34 



2^^ HINGHAM IN THE CIVIL WAR. 

14, 1865, by reason of expiration of term of service ; recruited 
for Hingliam. 

CHARLES CAMPBELL. 

Born in Boston, July 26, 1826. 

Private in Co. D, and enlisted from Hingham, Dec. 31, 1863 ; 
mustered Jan. 9, 1864, and on the Qtli of the June following 
was transferred to the Navy ; served on the quota of Hingham. 

CORNELIUS CONNELL. 

Enrolled from Hingham, age 23. 

Mustered as private in Co. D, Jan. 9, 1864 ; discharged Nov. 14, 
1865, by reason of expiration of term of service. 

Mr. Connell was taken prisoner, and confined at Florence, 
Ala. 

SAMUEL N. CORTHELL. 

Age 21. ■ 

Was private in Co. D, and enlisted from Hingham ; mustered 
Jan. 9, 1864, and discharged Nov. 14, 1865. 

Mr. Corthell, with many of his company, was taken prisoner 
at Gainesville, Fla., and conveyed to Florence. He was previ- 
ously a member of Co. K, Seventh Regiment. 

WILLIAM L. CUMMINGS. 

Age 30. 

From Weymouth, on the quota of Hingham, and was mustered 
in Co. D, Jan. 9, 1864; discharged June 24, 1865, by reason 
of close of the war. • ^ 

ALFRED GARDNER. 

Born in HingKam, July 15, 181 2. 

Enlisted February, 1863, as private in Co. C, and was mustered 
in March following. 



'»• 



THREE YEARS' MEN. 267 

CHARLES GARDNER. 

Born in Hingham. 
Enlisted from Brighton. 

GEORGE W. FARRAR. 

Age 38. 

Enlisted from Hingham, and Dec. 28, 1863, was mustered in 
Co. B ; mustered out by reason of expiration of term of 
service, May 23, 1865. 

JAMES HICKEY. 

Enlisted from Hingham, age 26. 

Member of Co. C, and mustered Jan. 6, 1864 ; discharged Nov. 
14, 1865, by reason of close of the war. 

* WILLIAM HENRY JONES. 
Co. C. 

JOSEPH SMITH MILLER. 

Born at Salem, Mass., May 20, 1847. 

Co. F. 

Enlisted from Hingham, and was mustered Jan. 27, 1864. 
Struck in the hand by a bullet, at Deep Bottom, Va., and 
honorably discharged by reason of disability from wound, May 
20, 1865. 

SAMUEL NEWCOMB, 2d. 

Born in Hingham, July 9, 1825. 

Co. D. 

Enlisted from Hingham, Dec. 22, 1863 ; mustered Jan. 9, 1864 ; 
transferred to the Navy at Hilton Head, on the 9th of the 
following June. 



268 HINGHAM IN THE CIVIL WAR. 

THOMAS RAFFERTY, Jun. 
Age 20,. 

Enlisted from Hingham, and was mustered in Co. F, Jan. 27, 
1864. 

* DENNIS SCULLY. 
Co. D. 



EDMUND SPELLMAN. 
Age 22. 
For quota of Hingham. Mustered Dec. 26, 1863, in Co. A. 

* FRANK H. TILTON. 
Co. C. 

PHILO C. WINSLOW. 
Age 36. 
Co. A, 
Enrolled from Hingham, and mustered Dec, 26, 1863, 



THREE YEARS' MEN. ' 269 



FIFTH REGIMENT OF CAVALRY. 

This regiment was composed of colored men, and was the 
only regiment of colored cavalry organized in Massachusetts. 

It was mustered into the service of the United States by 
companies, at different times in the early part of 1864, and was 
mustered out Oct. 31, 1865. 

Its field of service was principally in the Department of Vir- 
ginia, and it was present in the engagement at Bailor's Farm, 
Va. At the date of mustering out, it was located at Clarksville, 
Texas. 

The official record shows the following enlistments from 
Hingham : — 

PRIVATES. 

RUFUS CLARK. 

Age 22. 

Co. B. 

Enlisted for the quota of Hingham, and mustered Jan. 29, 1864; 
discharged June 5, 1865, by reason of close of the war. 



THOMAS DAVIS. 

Age 18. 

Mustered in Co. I, March 26, 1864; discharged by reason of 
expiration of term of service, Oct. 31, 1865. 



GEORGE JONES. 

Age IT- 

Enlisted for quota of Hingham in Co. G, and was mustered May 
7, 1864; discharged Oct. 31, 1865, by reason of close of the 
war. 



270 



BINGHAM IN THE CIVIL WAR. 



MATTHEW H. LUCAS. 



Age 21. 



Enlisted for quota of Hingham ; mustered Jan. 29, 1864, in Co. 
B, and was discharged Oct. 31, 1865, by reason of expiration 
of term of service. 

JOSEPH NATHAN. 

Age 24. 

Co.-B. 

Enlisted Jan. 29, 1864 ; discharged Oct. 31, 1865, by reason of 
expiration of term of service ; enlisted for quota of Hingham. 



LIST OF MEN IN CAVALRY SERVICE. 



Orietes L. Bailey. 
Thomas T. Barnes. 
Edward T. Bouv6. 
Charles Campbell. 
Rufus Clark. 
Thomas Cloney. 
Cornelius Cornell. 
Samuel N. Corthell. 
William L. Cummings. 
William A. Daggett. 
Thomas Davis. 
George M. Farrar. 
Alfred Gardner. 
Charles Gardner. 
Frank H. Gilman. 
Eben Hart. 
James Hickey. 



Thomas Hickey. 
George Jones. 
William H. Jones. 
Charles D. Kilburn. 
Matthew H. Lucas. 
John McLaughlin. 
Arvander Merrow. 
Joseph S. Miller. 
Joseph Nathan. 
Samuel Newcomb, 2d. 
Thomas Rafiferty, jun. 
James G. Raymond. 
Dennis Scully. 
Edward Spellman. 
Benjamin Thomas. 
Frank H. Tilton, 
Philo C. Winslow. 






1 



CHAPTER XIV. 



ADDITIONAL ENLISTMENTS. 



MANY of the names of the soldiers and sailors here includ- 
ed, will be found among the papers of the town relating 
to the war. In a majority of instances they were recruited, and 
probably served, for the quota of Hingham. All that could be 
obtained with regard to age, residence, time or place of enlist- 
ment, or the nature of their service, is embraced in the brief 
records which follow : — 

EDWIN ALLEN. 
Three years ; served for quota of Hingham. 

LOUIS ANDERSON. 
A Recruit. 

CALVIN R. BAKER. 
A Recruit. 

JOHN BAKER. 
Three years, enlisted for quota of Hingham. 

JOSEPH BARSTOW. 



Of Hingham. 



Served with Kit Carson. 



GEORGE W. BOEN. 

Three years ; included in the list returned by town authorities 
as serving for the quota of Hingham. 



2/2 HINGHAM IN THE CIVIL WAR. 

GEORGE H. BONNEY. 

Three years ; returned by the selectmen as serving for the quota 
of Hinjiham. 



'&' 



EDWIN BOOTH. 

JOHN BROWN. 

Three years; enlisted frorn Hingham, and included in the official 
list returned by the selectmen as serving on the quota of the 
town. 

MELZAR W. CLARK. 

A resident of Hingham. Mr. Clark rendered important service, 
first as nurse, and afterwards as ward-master, in the United 
States Hospital at Point Lookout. 

JOHN COLLINS. 
Three years ; served for the quota of Hingham. 

THOMAS COLLINS. 
Recruit ; three years. 

WILLIAM COLMAN. 
BARNEY CONALEY. 

Age 22. 
Tailor. Enrolled from Hingham, Jan. 6, 1864. 

CHARLES COOK. 
Three years; enlisted for quota of Hingham. 

HENRY DAGGETT. 

Enlisted for three years, and served for the quota of the town. 



ADDITIONAL ENLISTMENTS. 2/3 

HORATIO M. DALLAS. 

On authority of town documents, enlisted Jan. 2, 1865, for one 
year, and served as captain in frontier service. 

THOMAS D. DALTON. 
Three years; served for the quota of Hingham. 

ALBERT DAMON. 

JAMES DEMPSEY. 
Three years; and enlisted for quota of Hingham. 

HENRY B. DOWNES. 
On town's quota ; enlisted for three years. 

JOSIAH EDSON. 

WEST D. ELDREDGE. 
Enlisted for three years, and served for the quota of Hingham. 

LENDAL HANSCOM EWELL. 

Born in Hingham, Sept. 7, 1841. 

Served at Fortress Monroe, Va., with the Fourth Regiment 
Infantry, M. V., as volunteer member in Co. H, Hancock Light 
Guard, of Quincy. Enrolled May 22, 1861 ; mustered out with 
the regiment July 22, 1861. 

Mr. Evvell died at Williamsburg, N.Y., Oct. 2, 1870, and was 
buried in the Fort Hill Cemetery in this town. 

He was a son of Jacob A. and Sarah C (Barnes) Ewell. 

THOMAS M. FARRELL. 
35 



274 HINGHAM IN THE CIVIL WAR. 

JOHN G. GORHAM. 

Age 43- 

Farmer. Recruited for quota of Hingham, and, according to 
town documents, enrolled in the Fifty-sixth Regiment. Subse- 
quently rejected. 

TIMOTHY GORDON. 

A native of Hingham; resident of Taunton, Mass. ; was captain 
of the Taunton Light Guard, Co. G, Fourth Regiment, M. V. 
M., and left Boston April 17, 1861, for Fortress Monroe, where 
he shared in the general experience of the regiment during 
its service of three months. 

Capt. Gordon was present in the engagement at Big Bethel, 
Va. 

JAMES GORMAN. 

Age 23. 

Cigar-maker. Town papers say of the Twenty-first Regiment. 
Enrolled Feb. 24, 1864, from Providence, R.I. 

THOMAS GRIFFIN. 
Three years, and reckoned on the quota of the town. 

EDWARD HACKETT. 
Enlisted for three years, and reckoned on the quota of Hingham. 

MARK HALL. 

Age 35. 

Laborer. Heavy Artillery ; enrolled from Hingham, and en- 
listed Dec. 18, 1863, on the quota of the town; afterwards 
rejected. 

OTIS C. HARDY. 
Enlisted for three years ; served for quota of Hingham, 



ADDITIONAL ENLISTMENTS. 2/5 

JAMES HAYES. 
WILLIAM HILLARSTON. 

Recruited by Col, Edward Cazneau ; enrolled from Gloucester, 
and mustered Jan. 5, 1864. 

EDWARD BOURNE HINCKLEY. 

\ ' Age 35. 

Clergyman ; enlisted Aug. 22, 1862. 

HENRY A. HITCHCOCK. 

Three years ; served for the quota of Hingham. 

JEREMIAH HURLEY. 

Returned by town authorities in the list of persons serving for 
the quota of Hingham. 

EDWARD KELLEY. 

Returned by town authorities as serving on the quota of 
Hingham. 

JOSEPH B. KELSEY. 

KITTREDGE. 

Quota of Hingham. 

WILLIAM H. LANE. 

Three years ; served on quota of Hingham. 

JACOB LOWE. 

Age 34. 

Served with the United States Colored Troops, and was mustered 
from Hingham in Fifth Artillery, Feb. 25, 1865. 



276 



HINGHAM IN THE CIVIL WAR. 



JOHN C. MAGUIRE. 

Born in Hingham, age 25. 

Removed to Monson, Mass., and enlisted there October, 1862, as 
private in Co. G of the Forty-sixth Regiment, M. V. M., nine 
months ; mustered out at Springfield, Mass., July 29, 1863, by 
reason of expiration of term of service. In the Department 
of North Carolina it was present at the battles of Kinston, 
Whitehall, and Goldsboro.' 

PATRICK MAHONY. 

MICHAEL McGRANE. 
Nine months ; served for second quota of the town. 

CHARLES H. MUSCHATT. 
Three years ; served for quota of Hingham. 

GEORGE H. OSBORN. 
Enrolled from Quincy, age 19. 

EDWIN POINEY. 
Enlisted for three years, and reckoned on the quota of the town. 

EDWARD L. PRESTON. • 

A recruit. Town papers say " laborer ; Co. A, Fifth Cavalry ; " 
enrolled Jan. 2, 1864. 

WILLIAM RANDALL. 

Recorded in town papers as " moulder ; Fourth Battalion ; " 
enlisted Aug. 18, 1862. 

EDWARD ROACH. 
Enlisted for three years, and served for the quota of the town. 



ADDITIONAL ENLISTMENTS. 277 

DAVID P. ROBINSON. 

ALBERT SAWYER. 
Returned by the selectmen as serving for the quota of Hingham, 

FRANKLIN SIMMONS. 

Served for the quota of Hingham, and included in the list 
returned by town authorities. 

WILLIAM T. SPRAGUE. 
Three years ; served for quota of Hingham. 

WILLIAM THOMPSON. 

Son of Mr. Finton Thompson of this town ; was in artillery 
service. 

CLASSED AS ADDITIONAL ENLISTMENTS. 

Edwin Allen, Albert Damon. 

Louis Anderson. James Dempsey. 

Calvin R. Baker. Henry B. Downes. 

John Baker. Josiah Edson, 

Joseph Barstow. West D. Eldredge. 

George W. Boen. Thomas M. Farrell. 

George H. Bonney. Timothy Gordon. 

Edwin Booth. James Gorman. 

John Brown. Thomas GrifQn. 

Melzar W. Clark. Edward Hackett. 

John CoHins. . Mark Hall. 

Thomas Collins. Otis C. Hardy. 
William Colman. . James Hayes. 

Barney Conaley. William Hillarston. 

Charles Cook. Edward B. Hinckley. 

Henry Daggett. Plenry A. Hitchcock. 

Horatio M. Dallas. Jeremiah Hurley. 

Thomas D. Dalton. Edward Kelley. 



278 



HINGHAM IN THE CIVIL WAR. 



Joseph B. Kelsey. 

Kittredge. 

William H. Lane. 
Jacob Lowe. 
John C. Maguire. 
Patrick Mahony. 
Michael McGrane. 
Charles H. Muschatt. 
George H. Osborn. 



Edward Poiney. 
Edward L. Preston. 
William Randall. 
Edward Roach. 
David P, Robinson. 
Albert Sawyer. 
Franklin Simmons, 
William T. Sprague. 
William Thompson. 




CHAPTER XV. 

VETERAN RESERVE CORPS AND REGULAR ARMY. 

VETERAN RESERVE CORPS. 

In addition to those included in the general records as having 
been transferred to the Veteran Reserve Corps, the official list 
contains the following, viz. : — 

MICHAEL CARR. 

Age 28. 

Enlisted for the quota of Hingham ; mustered Oct, 13, 1863 ; 
discharged by order of War Department, Nov, 30, 1865. 

MICHAEL CASEY. 

Enlisted from Hingham, age 24. 

Mustered July 3, 1863 ; discharged by order of War Depart- 
ment, Nov. 30, 1865 ; served for quota of the town, 

JOHN DOLAN. 

Age 40, 

Mustered Oct, 2, 1863 ; served on quota of Hingham ; dis- 
charged by order of War Department, Nov, 30, 1865. 



PATRICK DONNELIN, 

Age 45, 

Recruit; enlisted from Boston; mustered Aug, 11, 1864; dis- 
charged Aug, II, 1866, by reason of expiration of service. 



2 So HINGHAM IN THE CIVIL WAR. 

MOSES FAIRFIELD. 

Age IS- 

Enlisted for quota of Hingham ; mustered July 29, 1863 \ dis- 
charged Nov. 30, 1865, by order of War Department. 

MICHAEL FLEMMING. 

Age 26. 

Mustered Nov. 4, 1863 ; discharged Nov. 30, 1865, by order of 
War Department ; served for quota of Hingham. 

THOMAS FOLEY. 

Age 49. 

Enlisted for quota of Hingham ; mustered Oct. 28, 1863, and 
discharged by order of War Department, Nov. 30, 1865, 

PETER FORRESTER. 

Age 25. 

Enlisted from Hingham for town's quota; mustered Oct. 31, 
1864. 

EDWARD GALVIN. 

Age 23. 
Enlisted for quota of Hingham ; mustered May 10, 1864. 

LAWRENCE HICKS. 

Age 53. 

Enlisted from Hingham for quota of the town ; mustered Aug. 18, 
1863 ; discharged by order of War Department, Nov. 30, 1865. 

JOHN KEEFE. 

Age 48. 
Enlisted from Hingham for the town's quota ; mustered July 25, 



VETERAN RESERVE CORPS. 28 1 

1863, and discharged by order of War Department, Nov. 30, 
1865. 

* HENRY B. LIVINGSTON. 



JAMES McGregor. 

Age 46. 

From Chelmsford, Mass. ; enlisted July 23, 1864; included in 
town papers as recruited for Hinghara. 

EDWARD Mclaughlin. 

Age 23. 

Mustered Sept. 29, 1863, and discharged by order of War 
Department, Nov. 30, 1865 ; served for quota of Hingham. 

JAMES TETTLER. 

Age 40. 

Quota of Hingham ; mustered July 29, 1863 ; discharged Nov. 
30, 1865, by order of War Department. 

CHARLES TINMONS. 

Age 37. 

Quota of Hingham ; Mustered Nov. i, 1863 ; discharged by 
order of War Department, Nov. 30, 1865. 

36 



282 HINGHAM IN THE CIVIL WAR. 



REGULAR ARMY. 

The enlistments from Hingham, in the Regular Army of the 
United States, were few in number. 

The following records are all that could be obtained : — 

* RICHARD J. FARRELL. 



DENNIS MULLIAN. 
Age 21. 
Of the Nineteenth Infantry, and mustered May lo, 1864. 

JOSEPH HENRY NOYES. 
See Third Regiment Heavy Artillery. 

WILLIAM PERKINS. 

Aare 22. 
Mustered in the Nineteenth Infantry, May 10, 1864. 

* MICHAEL FRANCIS THOMPSON. 

JOSEPH W. WELSH. 

Age 32. 
Mustered Sept. 24, 1864, and was detailed as hospital steward. 

JAMES H. WILLIAMS. 

Age 24. 

Nineteenth Infantry, and mustered May 10, 1864; served for 
quota of Hingham. 



ENLISTMENTS IN THE REGULAR ARMY. 



283 



VETERAN RESERVE CORPS. 



Michael Carr. 
Michael Casey. 
John Dolan. 
Patrick Donnelin. 
Moses Fairfield. 
Michael Flemming. 
Thomas Foley. 
Peter Forrester. 



Edward Galvin. 
Lawrence Hicks. 
John Keefe. 
Henry B. Livingston, 
James McGregor. 
Edward McLaughlin. 
James Tettler. 
Charles Tinmons. 



Richard J. Farrell. 
Dennis Mullian. 
Joseph H. Noyes. 



REGULAR ARMY. 



William Perkins. 
Michael F. Thompson. 
Joseph W. Welsh. 



James H. Wilhams. 




CHAPTER XVI. 

ENLISTMENTS IN OTHER STATES OF NATIVES OR RESIDENTS OF 

HINGHAM. 



COLONEL 

HAWKES FEARING, Jun. 

Born in Hingham, May 20, 1826. 

AT the outbreak of the war, resided at Manchester, N.H. 
Being connected with the Fourth Regiment, M. V. M., as 
lieutenant-colonel, he at once responded to the call of Gov. 
Andrew, and reported for duty at the State House at Boston, 
where a council of war was being held on the i6th of May, 1861. 
At the close of the session he came to Hingham, took part in 
calling together the members of the Lincoln Light Infantry, as 
well as shared in the deliberations of the meeting, and the next 
day returned to Boston. Leaving the city with the Fourth 
Regiment at 6 o'clock, p.m., of the 17th, he was three months at 
Fortress Monroe and vicinity. 

On the 24th of September, 1861, he was commissioned colo- 
nel of the Eighth Regiment New Hampshire Volunteers, then 
being gathered at Manchester. This regiment was organized in 
December, and left the State Jan. 5, 1862. It was assigned 
to the New England Division, intended for operation in the 
Department of the Gulf. 

After being in camp three weeks at Fort Independence, Bos- 
ton Harbor, it embarked for Ship Island, and was there attached 
to Phelps's brigade. The summer was spent at Camp Parapet, 
eight miles above New Orleans ; Col. Fearing in this time being 
eight weeks in the regimental hospital from fever. 



ENLISTMENTS OF HINGHAM MEN IN OTHER STATES. 



285 



Its first engagement was at Georgia Landing in the following 
October. 

In the engagements at Bisland, in April, 1863, Col. Fearing 
was wounded. 

In command of the second brigade, Emory's division, from May 
to the time of the surrender of Port Hudson, in July, a period of 
forty-nine days, he was actively engaged in the siege of this 
stronghold of the enemy. Here the services of the Eighth New 
Hampshire Regiment were such as to render its history one of 
renown. Twice it led the assaulting column. It is a fact worthy 
of mention, that, during the severe struggle of the 27th of May, 
the regiment, in its eagerness to grapple with the enemy, charged 
its way through three of our own lines, falling upon the foe, and 
driving him from his strongly intrenched position to a point 
within his main works. At the close of the attack, one hundred 
and three of the two hundred and ninety-seven men engaged 
were either killed, wounded, or missing. 

At the second assault by this regiment on the 14th of June, 
the loss was one hundred and twenty-two of the two hundred 
and seventeen engaged. 

From this time the besiegers lay momentarily expecting to 
be called for an advance on the foe known to be in front, or to 
be attacked by a large force supposed to be in the rear. 

On the 3d of July, came the news of the surrender of Vicks- 
burg ; upon which Gen. Gardner, then in command of Port Hud- 
son, at once proposed terms of capitulation ; the New Hamp- 
shire Eighth having the honor of first entering the place after 
its surrender. 

In the following autumn Col. Fearing was detailed for recruit- 
ing service, and came to Concord, N.H., returning to New 
Orleans in November, in command of six hundred men, recruit- 
ed for different regiments then in the service. 

The winter was spent in organizing the regiment as a cavalry 
corps, intended for the Red River Expedition, the following 
spring. This being accomplished, he was next detailed for court- 
martial duty, during the summer of 1864, in New Orleans and 
vicinity. With the close of hostilities, the Eighth was assigned 
to provost-guard duty at Natchez, Miss., and was mustered out 
in October by order of War Department. \ 



286 HINGHAM IN THE CIVIL WAR. 

Aside from the battles before mentioned, fifty-three distinct 
skirmishes, some of which in former times would have been 
classed as important battles, are included in the record of the 
regiment. 

The Eighth was also one of the regiments which comprised 
the expedition under Gen. Butler, the success of which wrested 
from the enemy one of the most important cities of the South. 

Gen Davis, commanding fourth brigade, cavalry division, 
affirms that " not only the success, but the safety, of the entire 
command had in many instances depended on the steady bearing 
and dauntless bravery of the New Hampshire Eighth. Its 
gallant and heroic conduct, its fearlessness and impetuous daring 
in the hour of battle, have been conceded by friends and foes.' ' 
Brevet Maj.-Gen. James McMillan adds, that " To say, I am a 
soldier of the Eighth New Hampshire, is sufficient to command 
honor and homage." 

* JAMES BALLENTINE. 
Fifteenth Independent New York Volunteers. 

LIEUTENANT 

WILLIAM BARNES. 

A native of Hingham, son of William and Abigail (Osborn) Barnes, 
Enlisted in New York as jarivate ; afterwards promoted lieu- 
tenant, and served through the war. Lieut. Barnes was at one 
time a prisoner in Andersonville, Ga. 

GEORGE BICKNELL. 

Son of Leavitt L. and Harriet E. Bicknell, was born in Hing- 
ham, May 4, 1842; enlisted in the Second Regiment, New 
York Volunteer Infantry ; was wounded in the first battle of 
Bull Run, by a musket-ball passing through the fleshy part of 
the arm ; taken prisoner and confined for ten months in Salis- 
bury and other Southern prisons. He was exchanged with 
others, and returned to New York, where he soon after enlisted 
in a New York Regiment of heavy artillery, in which, and 



ENLISTMENTS OF HINGHAM MEN IN OTHER STATES. 287 

in the invalid corps, he served during the remainder of the 
war, 

MARTIN GUSHING. 

Born in Hiiigham. 
Enlisted from Pittsburg, Pa., and was in cavalry service. 



CAPTAIN 

HENRY HOWARD GUSHING. 

Was quartermaster in the Eighty-eighth Illinois Volunteers ; 
afterwards captain, and served in Rosecrans's Army. Since 
deceased, and buried in the Hingham Gemetery. Was son of 
Mr. George Gushing of this town. 

SERGEANT 

DAVID P. ELDREDGE. 

Born in Hingham, Nov. 29. 1822. 

Son of Reuben and Sally Eldredge ; was a resident of Kansas 
when the war broke out. Soon after the call for troops in 
1 86 1, Mr. Eldredge left his farm to join the military service, 
and was mustered as orderly sergeant of Go. G, of the Seventh 
Kansas Gavalry. In 1864 he re-enlisted as veteran, and 
received promotion. 

Serg. Eldredge was in all the battles and skirmishes in which 
his regiment engaged. He also performed effective service as a 
Union spy. 

July 17, 1873, David P. Eldredge died at his home in Kansas, 
aged fifty years, seven months, and eighteen days. 

JOHN J. L. FRENGH. 

Son of the late Brosard French, was 'born in ■ Hingham, 
August, 1824. 

Resident of Goncord, N.H. ; mustered Sept. 5, 1864, as arti- 
ficer in Go. E, First Regiment N. H. Heavy Artillery ; discharged 
June 23, 1S65, by reason of close of the war, 

*GALEB GILL. 



288 HINGHAM IN THE CIVIL WAR. 

SERGEANT 

JOHN GORMAN. 

Born at St. John, N.B., April i, 1842. 

Enlisted at New York, and was mustered as private in Co. K, 
Thirty-sixth Regiment, N.Y. Vols., Feb. 14, 1862; discharged 
from Bellevue Hospital on account of wounds, Jan. 5, 1863 ; 
re-enlisted in Co. K, Twenty-fifth N. Y. Cavalry, for three 
years, or during the war, July 19, 1864; promoted sergeant 
Sept. I, 1864; mustered out June 16, 1865, by reason of close 
of the war. 

Mr. Gorman served with the Army of the Potomac under 
Gen. McClellan, at the battles of Yorktown, Williamsburg, Fair 
Oaks, Gaines' Mill, Savage Station, and Malvern Hill. He was 
also with Gen. Sheridan, at Winchester, Cedar Creek, Fisher's 
Hill, and through the valley campaign. 

Wounded by a gun-shot through the* right lung at Malvern 
Hill, July I, 1862, he was captured and carried to Libby Prison ; 
not, however, until he had lain exposed and uncared for upon the 
battle-field until July 4. After being confined for six weeks, 
during which time he was relieved of the greater part of his 
clothing, he was exchanged, and sent to the Bellevue Hospital, 
where he remained until discharged. Mr. Gorman still retains 
the bullet which disabled him. It was- extracted at the New 
England rooms in New York City, by Dr. Edward Herrick, 
fifteen months after the battle. He is now, and has been since 
the close of the war, a resident of Hingham. 



HOSEA HARDEN. 

Born in Hingham, March 8, 1839. 

Mustered June 21, 1861, at Yonkers, N.Y., as private in Co G, 
Fortieth Regiment, N. Y. V. 1. 

Was in the Army of the Potomac, and had the general experi- 
ence of infantry service. Engaged at the siege of Yorktown, 
battle of Williamsburg, Fair Oaks, and in the retreat to James 
River ; also in the engagement at Malvern Hill, Va. 



ENLISTMENTS OF BINGHAM MEN IN dTHER STATES. 289 

In the summer of 1862 was sick in camp and general hospital 
at Harrison's Landing, and Aug. 1 1 removed to hospital at 
Philadelphia, where he remained till Nov. 20 of the following 
autumn, when he was discharged for disability. 

CAPTAIN 

* ELIJAH HOBART. 
Co. B, Ninety-third Regiment, N. Y. Volunteers. 

ALLEN G. JENNINGS. . 

Born in Stratford, Fulton County, N.Y., Jan. 28, 1843. 

Resident of Hingham, and pastor of the Second Unitarian 
Society; enlisted Aug. 21, 1862, for three years, in Co. H, 
One Hundred and Twenty-first Regiment, N. Y. Vols. 

In consequence of severe marching and exposure, nearly one- 
half of the men became disabled ; Mr. Jennings being of the 
number. After a short time spent in the hospital at Frederick, 
Md., he was discharged and sent home. While absent, he was 
in the battle of South Mountain, but, as he states, " did but little 
figJiting, as all their strength was spent in marching!' 

At home he soon recovered his health, and resolved to 
go again. Accordingly, on the 13th of September, 1864, he 
re-enlisted, and was in the field about two months with the 
One Hundred and Seventy-fifth Regiment, N. Y, Vols. He 
was in the battle of Cedar Creek ; after which, having had some 
experience in medicine and surgery, was transferred to the U. S. 
General Hospital at Frederick, Md., where he served as clerk 
and assistant to the executive officers until the close of the war. 

Whole time of service about fourteen months, " with the 
general experience that usually falls to the lot of a soldier." 

COLONEL 

CHARLES BRADFORD LEAVITT. 

Born in West Randolph, Mass., Jan. 16, 1842. 

Resident of Hingham; enlisted Oct. 16, 1863, at Memphis, 
Tenn., and Oct. 20, was mustered as first lieutenant in Co. M, 
of the sixth Regiment, U. S. Colored Heavy Artillery. 



290 HINGHAM IN THE CIVIL WAR. 

March 13, 1864, promoted lieutenant-colonel, Seventieth U.S. 
Colored Infantry, This organization was consolidated with the 
Seventy-first U. S. Colored Infantry, Nov. 7, 1864. Being then 
the junior lieutenant-colonel, he was transferred Dec. 14, 1864, 
as major of the Twelfth U. S. Colored Heavy Artillery. 

Was present at several engagements in Mississippi, Louisi- 
ana, Arkansas, and Tennessee, and at the battle of Pleasant 
Hill (Red River), and Nashville, Tenn. 

In one of the skirmishes received two wounds, and for two 
months was in hospital at Natchez, Miss. 

Mustered out at Louisville, Ky., April 24, 1867. 

While lieutenant-colonel, he was appointed on Gen. Lorenzo 
Thomas' staff as inspector of colored troops from Cairo, 111., to 
New Orleans. In the spring of 1865 commanded the Post of 
Bowling Green, Ky. ; afterwards at Mumfordsville, then at Mul- 
draugh's Hills, and lastly commanded the Military Prison 
Department at Louisville, Ky., from July, 1866, till the time of 
mustering out. 

SERGEANT 

BEZA H. LINCOLN. 

Son of the late Rufus W. Lincoln, and a native of Hingham. 
Enlisted from Concord, in New Hampshire First Heavy Artil- 
lery, Co. E, as quartermaster-sergeant. Mustered Sept. 5, 
1864; discharged June 23, 1865, by reason of close of the war. 

SERGEANT 

JOHN LINCOLN, Jun. 

Born in Hingham, Oct. 24, 1837. 

Jan. 8, 1862, enlisted at Hebron, Conn., as private in Co. G of 
the Thirteenth Regiment Connecticut Infantry Volunteers, 
three years. In March promoted corporal ; re-enlisted Feb. 
7, 1864, at Thibodeaux, La., as veteran volunteer, and July 6 
promoted sergeant. 

Sergeant Lincoln was in active service during more 
than four years of the time covered by the rebellion. He was 
in the engagement at Georgia Landing, Irish Bend, Cane-river 



ENLISTMENTS OF HINGHAM MEN IN OTHER STATES. 



291 



Crossing, Mansura, La., Opequan, Fisher's Hill, Cedar Creek, 
Va., and was wounded near Winchester Va., Sept. 19, 1864. 

In April, 1863, he was sick with typhus fever at Washington, 
La. ; and May i, conveyed to the Marine Hospital at New 
Orleans : there he remained until the 20th of September, when, 
having regained his health, he was discharged, and again reported 
for duty. 

After the battle of Cedar Creek, he was in different places in 
the Shenandoah Valley, from Staunton to Martinsburg, up to 
January, 1865, when he went to Savannah, after Sherman had 
reached the sea. 

In March he was at Morehead City, Newbern, and Kins- 
ton, N.C., and in May returned to Savannah. From this time he 
was stationed in different localities in the State, from Augusta 
to Rabun County, until ordered to Fort Pulaski, where he was 
mustered out in April, 1866. 

SERGEANT 

* LEAVITT LINCOLN. 
Sixty-first Illinois V. I. 

GENERAL 

ALLYNE C. LITCHFIELD. 

Born in Hingham, July 15, 1835. 

Removed to Boston with his parents in 1844. 

• At the commencement of the war he was a resident of 
Michigan ; and in 1862 raised a company for the Fifth Michigan 
Cavalry, in which his zeal and organizing skill soon attracted the 
attention, and gained the favor, of superior officers. Before the 
regiment left the State, Mr. Litchfield was transferred to the 
Seventh Cavalry as lieutenant-colonel. With the Seventh he 
took the field with the Michigan Cavalry Brigade, under the gal- 
lant Custer, who subsequently said of him, " I regard Col. 
Litchfield as one of the most efficient officers of his rank in the 
service." His regiment between April and November, 1863, was 
in sixteen battles and skirmishes in Virginia and Maryland ; also 



292 



HINGHAM IN THE CIVIL WAR. 



in the battle at Gettysburg, Pa., July 3 of that year, in which 
its losses were eighty-one in killed, wounded, and missing. 

As commanding officer of his regiment, he was appreciated 
and respected. At Gettysburg his horse was shot under him ; 
and he narrowly escaped capture, while doing effective service, 
as the official report says, with a Spencer carbine. At Falling 
Waters, Col. Litchfield, with a single battalion, captured an 
entire rebel regiment, numbering four hundred men, with a 
stand of colors. 

In the famous Kilpatrick-Dahlgren raid on Richmond, the 
colonel was captured, with others, by the enemy, and sent to 
Libby Prison, where he was kept in close confinement with 
negroes for four and a half months, and for six weeks of the 
\xvaQ. ow one-third of a prison ration. From Richmond he was 
taken to Macon, Ga., and thence to Charleston, S.C., where he 
and some hundreds of prisoners were stockaded by the rebels 
under fire of the federal guns. At the end of a year he was 
exchanged. On his return from prison he was brevetted briga- 
dier-general. 

Gen. Litchfield is a son of Dea. Nichols Litchfield, formerly 
of this town, but now of Boston. In 1871 he received and 
accepted from the United States government the position of 
consui-jreneral to Calcutta. 



83^ 



^ JAMES LOWRY. 

Resident of Hingham. 

Served in the Third District Columbia Regiment ; was in numer- 
ous severe engagements, in one of which the regiment was 
nearly destroyed. He has a good record. 

* DANIEL MURPHY. 



WILLIAM L. NEAL. 

Sixth New Hampshire Infantry ; formerly resided at South Hing- 
ham ; now deceased. 



/ 



ENLISTMENTS OF HINGHAM MEN IN OTHER STATES. 293 

CHARLES REMINGTON. 
Served in the Lincoln Body Guard at Washington, D.C. 

JOHN FEARING ROGERS. 

Born in Stonington, Conn., May 5, 1841. 

Formerly a resident of Hingham, son of the late Dr. Edward 
C. and Lydia Gushing (Gilkey) Rogers. Enrolled from the 
State of Illinois under Col. Jefferson C. Davis ; was present, 
and took part, in the battles of Pittsburg Landing, Chickamau- 
ga, Lookout Mountain, Chattanooga, siege of Knoxville, Mis- 
sionary Ridge, Murfreesboro', Cumberland Gap, and was with 
Gen. Sherman at Atlanta, Ga. 

Mr. Rogers served through the war, and received an honora- 
ble discharge from Co. A of the Seventy-fourth Regiment 
Illinois Volunteers. 

HENRY E. SPAULDING. 

Born in Lyndeboro', N.H., Sept. 24, 1843. 

A resident of Hingham ; physician ; served in the Thirteenth 
Regiment New Hampshire Volunteer Infantry. Enlisted 
1862, was in the battle at Fredericksburg, and discharged 
May 14, 1863, for disability. 

CAPTAIN 

ISAIAH FEARING TOWER. 

Born in Hingham. 

Enlisted at Dayton, Montgomery Co., Ohio, and was mustered 
as private in Co. A of the Ninety-third Regiment, Ohio Vol- 
unteer Infantry, Aug. 22, 1862. 

Promoted first to sergeant; second to sergeant-major ; third 
to first lieutenant, and adjutant; and in 1863 to captain of 
Co. G. 

Capt. Tower had an active service from the time of muster- 
ing in. He was in the battles of Lawrenceburg and Richmond, 



294 



HINGHAM IN THE CIVIL WAR. 



Ky. ; Nashville, Tenn. ; Stone River, Perryville, Ky. ; Tally- 
homa, Chickamauga, Buzzard's Roost, Rocky Face Ridge, 
Dallas, New Hope Church, Kenesaw Mountain, Cassville, 
Atlanta, Ga. ; and at Nashville, Tenn., on the 15th and i6th 
of December, 1864. 

In the last engagement, he received a serious wound. His 
left arm was broken above the elbow, and the use of the hand 
entirely lost. Capt. Tower states that he entered the field at 
the time with but fifteen men and two officers. During the 
charge, the sergeants and both of the officers were killed, and 
he was wounded as described. Whole term of service, three 
years and four months. To these incidents of personal experi- 
ence, he adds the following complimentary note : " No Hing- 
ham boy is known to me, and there were many of them in the 
Army of the Cumberland, that behaved discreditably to his 
native town or State, — a record I doubt not you will duly 
appreciate." 

LIEUTENANT 

BENJAMIN SHURTLEFF WHITING. 

A native of Hingham. 

Enlisted in the State of Ohio, where he resided. Was also 
lieutenant in the Seventieth United States Infantry, and has a 
good record. 

CAPTAIN 

WEBSTER A. WHITING. 

Born in Hingham. 

Moved to the West some years before the war, and was captain 
of a company in the celebrated " Board of Trade Regiment," 
from Chicago. With the Eighty-eighth Illinois Volunteers, 

■ served in Rosecrans's army, and was an efficient and valiant 
officer. 

* CONRAD R YAGER. 



ENLISTMENTS OF HINGHAM MEN IN OTHER STATES. 295 



NATIVES OR RESIDENTS OF HINGHAM ENLISTED IN OTHER STATES. 



James Ballentine. 
William Barnes. 
George Bicknell. 
Martin Gushing. 
Henry H. Gushing, 
David P. Eldredge. 
Hawkes Fearing, jun. 
John J. L. French. 
Caleb Gill. 
John Gorman. 
Hosea Harden. 
Elijah Hobart. 
Allen G. Jennings. 
Charles B. Leavitt. 



Beza H. Lincoln. 
John Lincoln, jun. 
Leavitt Lincoln. 
Allyne C. Litchfield. 
James Lowry. 
Daniel Murphy. 
William L. Neal. 
Charles Remington. 
John F. Rogers. 
Henry E. Spaulding. 
Isaiah F. Tower. 
Benjamin S. Whiting. 
Webster A. Whiting. 
Conrad P. Yager. 




CHAPTER XVII. 



THE NAVY. 



Number of Massachusetts Men in the Navy — Number of Hingham Men in the Navy — 

Naval Records. 

HINGHAM was well represented in this arm of the 
service. 

Congress passed an act July 4, 1864, allowing all men in the 
Navy to be credited on their proper quotas. The whole number 
who had enlisted in Massachusetts to date of March, 1864, and 
whose names were on the books of the receiving-ship " Ohio," 
was twenty-two thousand, three hundred and sixty. These were 
apportioned among the cities and towns of the State, under the 
same rules governing credits for enlistments in the army. The 
portion received by Hingham under this act was a timely contri- 
bution towards filling the quota then required from the town. 

The number of natives or residents of Hingham serving in 
the Navy, so far as known, was thirty-five ; as follows : — 



CHIEF ENGINEER 

CHARLES HARDING LORING. 

Born in Boston, Mass., Dec. 26, 1828 ; resident of Hingham. 

Feb. 26, 185 1, appointed third assistant engineer, in the U.S. 
Navy. 

May 21, 1853, promoted second assistant engineer. 

May 9, 1857, promoted first assistant engineer. 

January, 1861, stationed at the U.S. Navy Yard, at Charles- 
town, Mass. 

March 25, 1861, Mr. Loring was promoted to chief engineer. 

May 10, 1861, ordered to the U. S. steam-frigate " Minnesota," 



THE NAVY. 29; 

forty-eight guns, as first engineer, attached to the North Atlantic 
blockachng scjuadron. 

Aug. 27 to 29, 1 86 1, this vessel was flag-ship in the attack at 
Hatteras Inlet. ■ 

Sept. 2, 1861, the "Minnesota" arrived at New York with 
rebel prisoners. 

March 8 and 9, 1862, Mr. Loring, in this vessel, took part in 
the engagement with the rebel ram " Merrimac," during which 
the U. S. ships "Cumberland " and "Congress" were sunk. 

March 8, 1862, participated in the engagement at Sewell's 
Point. 

0:t. 10, i852, ordered to Cincinnati on special service. 

In January, i855, he was on special duty at St. Louis, Mo. 

In January, 1867, on board the U. S. steam-frigate "Susque- 
hanna," fourteen guns, he was engaged in special service. 

In January, 186S, again on board the " Minnesota." 

During 1868 and 1869, he was waiting orders ; and April 6, 
1869, was assigned to the U. S. Navy Yard, at Washington, D.C. , 
in charge of the engineer's department. 

He is still in the service. 

ACTING-MASTER 

* THOMAS ANDREWS. 



ACTING ASSISTANT PAYMASTER. 

ANDREW TOWER. 

Born in Hanover, Mass., May 26, 1829. 

July 2, 1863, appointed acting assistant paymaster in the U. S. 
Navy, and ordered to Philadelphia. 

July 24, 1863, reported for duty at Philadelphia, and was 
ordered to the U. S. schooner " Norfolk Packet," five guns, 
attached to the South Atlantic blockading squadron ; and while 
in this vessel also had charge of the paymaster's department of 
the U. S. schooners. " C. P. Williams," four guns, and " Para," 

three guns. 

38 



298 



HIAGHAM IN THE CJVIL WAR. 



Dec. 25, 1863, he took part in the attack up Stono River, in 
the " C. P. Wilhams." 

July II, 1864, shared in the joint army and navy attack up 
the same river in the " Para." 

Aug. 29, 1864, ordered to the U. S. ironclad "Passaic," four 
guns. 

Sept. 4, 1864, ordered back to the "Norfolk Packet," 

Dec. 10, 1865, he was honorably discharged from the U. S. 
Navy. 

ACTING ASSISTANT SURGEON. 

FRANKLIN NICKERSON. 

Born in Hingham, Sept. 8, 183S. 

Nov. 16, 1863, he was appointed acting assistant surgeon in 
the U. S. Navy, and ordered to the U. S. steamer " Shokokon," 
six guns, attached to the North Atlantic blockading squadron, 
stationed in the rivers and sounds of North Carolina and Vir- 
ginia. In this vessel he took part in picket-duty, and in cover- 
ing the movements of troops. 

August, 1864, ordered to the U. S. steamer "Britannia," five 
guns, attached to the same squadron, and stationed off Wil- 
mington, N.C. While in her, he was engaged in enforcing the 
blockade. 

Nov. 5, 1864, resigned his position in the Navy, which 
resignation was accepted. 

ACTING ENSIGNS. 

* EDWARD WELLES HALCRO. 



CHARLES MASON FULLER. 

Born in Hingham, Feb. 17, 1S44. 

Jan. 14, 1863, he was appointed acting master' s-mate in the 
U. S. Navy, and ordered to the U. S. school-ship " Macedonian," 
stationed at Boston, for instruction. 



iSlE NAVY. 2Cq 



\-^J 



March 14, 1863, ordered to the West Gulf blockading 
squadron. 

March 30, 1863, ordered to the U S. iron-clad "Essex," 
twelve guns, attached to the Mississippi squadron. While here 
he was engaged in the dangerous duty of removing torpedoes 
from the river ; also in command of several foraging parties, 
one of which captured seventeen men and a set of colors of tl.e 
First Louisiana Cavalry, near Tunica Bend. 

May 23 to June 26, 1863, he took part in the siege of Port 
Hudson, on the " Essex ; " and while thus engaged, the vessel 
was struck twenty-three times by shells from the batteries of 
the enemy. 

June 15, 1863, was bearer of despatches from the " Essex" to 
Adm. Farragut. In the discharge of this duty he passed under 
a heavy fire for a distance of two miles, in a small boat, manned 
by four negroes, during which the stroke-oar was shot away, 

Feb. 24, 1864, promoted acting ensign. 

March, 1865, ordered to the U. S. iron-clad "Ozark," seven 
guns, attached to the Mississippi squadron. 

Sept. 5, 1865, received an honorable discharge. 



CHARLES ANDREW STEWART. 

Resident of Hingham ; born in Beverly, Mass., Aug. 19, 1833. 

May 3, 1862, he was appointed acting master' s-mate in the 
U. S, Navy, and ordered to the U. S. school-ship at New York, 
for instruction. 

June, 1862, ordered to take passage on the U. S. supply 
steamer " Magnolia," to Hampton Roads, to report tor duty on 
board the U. S. screw-sloop " Wachusett," ten guns, attached 
to the James River squadron. 

July, 1862, ordered to the U. S. steamer " Southfield," four 
guns, then repairing at Norfolk Navy Yard. 

November, 1862, " The Southfield " was ordered to the Sounds 
of North Carolina. 

January, 1864, ordered to the U. S. steamer " Underwriter," 
four guns. 



300 niiXGHAM IN THE CIVIL WAR. 

Feb. I, 1864, the "Underwriter" was boarded by an over- 
whelming force, and after an obstinate resistance captured. 
Mr, Stewart, with the rest of the officers and crew taken pris- 
oners, came to Richmond. After being conveyed from one 
locality to another, he was finally placed under fire at Char- 
leston, S.C. 

Oct. 26, 1864, exchanged at Richmond, and, on his arrival 
North, was granted one month's leave. At the expiration of 
this time, he was ordered to the U. S. steamer " Muscoota," ten 
guns, and in her went to Fortress Monroe, Beaufort, and Key 
West. 

March 16, 1865, promoted to acting ensign. 

The "Muscoota" sailed for Brazos Santiago, Texas, wdiere 
some of the crew were taken with yellow fever, and she was 
ordered North, arriving at Portsmouth, N.H., in August, 1866. 

Oct. 12, 1866, ordered to the U. S. steamer " Saco," ten guns ; 
and in her visited the principal ports in the West Indies, and 
finally was stationed at Aspinwall. 

Sept. 21, 1867, granted four months' leave, and a passage 
home. 

Jan. 21, 1868, he received an honorable discharge. 



ACTING THIRD ASSISTANT ENGINEER. 

JOHN MEANS TRUSSELL. 

Born in Belfast, Me., Aug. 16, 1832 ; resident of Hingliam. 

Aug. 26, 1864, shipped in the United States Navy, at Boston, 
as first-class fireman, and was sent to the United States receiv- 
ing ship " Ohio." 

Sept. 15, 1864, ordered on board the United States supply- 
steamer " Connecticut," and made the trip in her from Boston 
to Mobile, stopping at Hilton Head, Key West, Pensacola, and 
intermediate ports ; leaving supplies and mails for the different 
ships stationed at these points, and returning to Boston in about 
six weeks. 

Nov. I, 1864, sent on board the United States steamer " luka," 



THE NAVY. 



301 



seven guns, then fitting out at Boston for the East Gulf blockad- 
ing squadron, where she went, and was employed in cruising 
from Key West to Havana, along the coast of Cuba, and Mexico 
as far as the Rio Grande, and return. 

March 18, 1865, promoted to acting third assistant engineer, 
and ordered to the United States steamer ''Clyde," two guns, 
and on this vessel was employed in cruising between Key West 
and St. Marks, stopping at Tampa Bay and Charlotte Harbor. 

July, 1865, the "Clyde," was ordered to New York, where she 
arrived early in August. 

Aug. 16, 1865, granted one month's leave. 

Sept. 16, 1865, received an honorable discharge. 

captain's clerk 
AUGUSTUS BARNES. 

Born in Hingham, March 7, 1839. 

June 5, 1833, appointed paymaster's steward of the United 
States Sloop " Marion," practice-ship of the Naval Academy^ 
and in this capacity served until the end of the cruise in the 
following November. 

Dec. 21, 1863, appointed paymaster's clerk of the United 
States steamer " Pocahontas," six guns, fitting out at Philadel- 
phia for the West Gulf blockading squadron. 

July II, 1864, appointed captain's clerk on the same vessel. 

March 21, 1865, resigned at New Orleans, La., for a clerkship 
on shore. This resignation was regretfully accepted by his 
commanding officer. 

MASTERS-AT-ARMS. 

FREDERICK CLINTON BLAIR. 

Born in Pittsford, Rutland Co., Vt., Sept. 5, 1842. A resident of Hingham. 

Sept. 5, 1 86 1, shipped in the United States Navy, at Boston, as 
ordinary seaman, one year, for duty on board the United 
States barque " W. G. Anderson," seven guns, then fitting out 
at Boston for the West Gulf squadron, with headquarters at 



302 HINGHAM IN THE CIVIL WAR. 

Key West, for which place she soon sailed. Shortly after 
leaving Boston, Blair was rated master-at-arms, which rating 
he held to the end of the cruise. 

Nov. 12, 1 86 1, took part in the capture of the rebel privateer 
" Beauregard," which was conveyed to Key West. The " Ander- 
son " was then employed in cruising in the West Indies, and 
finally returned to Boston in the following March, when Blair 
was allowed twenty-four hours' leave. 

As soon as the " Anderson " could be got in readiness for sea, 
she was loaded with ammunition, and sailed a second time for 
the West Gulf blockading squadron, then having headquarters 
at Ship Island under command of Rear-admiral Farragut- 
On her arrival, she was employed in cruising, and enforcing the 
blackade, and in various special expeditions, among which was 
the cutting out of the rebel schooner " Montebello." 

While cruising, they fell in with and captured three blockade- 
runners ; one of which was the " Reindeer," loaded with cotton. 

Arriving at Pensacola, Blair was transferred, with twenty 
others, to the prize steamer " Arizona," as a crew to bring her 
North. On board this vessel he served as fireman, and came to 
Philadelphia. 

Nov. 12, 1862, his term of service having expired, he was dis- 
charged. 

'. eturning to Pittsford, and then removing to Brandon, he was 
there drafted, and entered the army as a private. While in this 
b.-a h of the service, about eight months, he was detailed as 
guard to transport substitutes and bounty-jumpers to Washing- 
ton ; after which, by general orders, he was transferred to the 
United States Navy at Boston, and sent on board the United 
States receiving-shii3 " Ohio" as seaman. 

Shortly after he was forwarded, with a large number of men, by 
transport to the United States receiving-ship "Potomac," of the 
West Gulf blockading squadron, stationed at Pensacola. From 
the " Potomac " he was sent on board the United States steamer 
" Metacomet," ten guns, then on the blockade off Mobile, where 
he received the rate of quartermaster Aug. 5, 1864. On this 
vessel, v,?hich was lashed to the flagship " Hartford," he took 



THE NAVY. 



303 



part in the memorable entrance into Mobile Bay by Rear-admi- 
ral Farragut, resulting in the capture of the rebel ram "Tennes- 
see," steamer " Selma," the sinking of the steamer " Gaines," and 
capture of Fort Gaines and Powell. 

He was then transferred to the now United States steamer 
"Selma," four guns, as one of a prize-crew, and here rated 
chief boatswain's-mate. On the " Selma" he assisted in reducing 
Fort Morgan, and was engaged in blockading Dog River Bar, 
and the still more hazardous duty of removing torpedoes. 

The " Selma " was finally ordered to New Orleans, where Mr. 
Blair, being sick with chronic diarrhoea, was placed in the Naval 
Hospital, and then sent North on the United States steam-sloop 
" Richmond," to the NavaJ Hospital at Chelsea, Mass. 

His term of service having expired, he was honorably dis- 
charged, Aug. I, 1865. 



ALFRED B. WHITING. 

Born in Hingham. 

Jan. 21, 1 86 1, shipped in the U. S. Navy, at Boston, as lands- 
man for three years, and was sent on board the U. S. receiving- 
ship " Ohio." 

Soon after assigned to the U. S. steam-frigate " Colorado " 
fifty-two guns, and there rated master-at-arms. 

The " Colorado " was sent to Ship Island to take part in the 
capture of New Orleans ; but, owing to the great draft of water 
required, she was unable to pass the bar at the mouth of the 
Mississippi River. 

Feb. 10, 1864, his time of service having expired, he was 
discharged at (Portsmouth, N.H. ; since deceased. 

gunner's mate 
CHARLES CAMPBELL. 

A resident of Hingham; born in Boston, July 26, 1826. 
June 8, 1864, transferred from the U. S. Army to the Navy at 



304 



HINCHAM IN THE CIVIL WAR. 



Hilton Head, S.C, and sent on board the U. S. store-ship 
''Vermont," where he was on the sick-list for three months, 

Sept. 15, 1864, ordered to the U. S. schooner "Para," three 
^';^uns, and on this vessel was engaged in bombarding, enforcing 
the blockade, and in guard-duty. 

Dec. I, 1864, rated to quarter-gunner. 

Mar. I, 1865, rated to gunner's mate, in charge. 

Aug. 7, 1865, discharged at Charlestovvn, Mass., his term of 
service having expired. 

paymaster's steward 
HENRY WINSLOW HERSEY. 

Born in Hingham, Aug. 16, 1823. 

June 2, 1862, shipped in the U. S. Navy at Boston, as lands- 
man, for three years. 

July 8, 1862, sent on board the U. S. steamer "Sachem," five 
guns, attached to the West Gulf blockading squadron. 

July 15, 1862, rated paymaster's steward. 

Aug. 12 to 16, took part in the engagement at Corpus Christi, 
and capture of the rebel armed schooner " Breaker," destroying 
two others. 

Dec. 16, 1862, took part in the capture of a schooner block- 
ade-runner. 

Jan. I, 1863, the "Sachem" was present in the engagement 
at Galveston, Texas, when the rebels captured the U. S. steamer 
' Harriet Lane," and two coal-barks, and when Com. Renshaw 
blew up the U. S. steamer " Westfield," to prevent her falling 
mto the hands of the enemy. 

Jan. 8, 1863, transferred to the U. S. steamer " Diana." 

March 28, 1863, the "Diana," while making a reconnoissance 
in Atchafalaya River, was fired upon by a concealed battery ; and 
after a fight of two hours and forty-five minutes, with all but one 
officer and a large portion of her crew killed or. wounded, 
eing entirely disabled, she drifted ashore and was captured. 
Jersey, though unhurt, was taken prisoner, and, with the rest of 
the crew, paroled, and sent to New Orleans. 



THE NAVY. 



305 



May 16, 1863, sent North, on the U. S. transport " Kensing- 
ton," to the U. S. receivmg-ship " North Carolina," at New 
York. 

July 10, 1864, exchanged, and sent to the U. S. iron-clad 
" Onondaga," four guns. After about three weeks' service on 
this vessel, he was taken sick, and sent to the Naval Hospital at 
New York. 

Sept. 6, 1864, having recovered, was sent to the U. S. steamer 
" Otsego," ten guns, attached to the North Atlantic blockading 
squadron. 

Nov. 12, 1864, took part in the reduction of the forts and 
capture of Plymouth, N.C. 

Dec. 9, 1864, the "Otsego" was sunk by a torpedo in the 
Roanoke River. Hersey, from exposure, was again placed on 
the sick-list, sent to the Naval Hospital at Newbern, N.C, and 
thence to New York, 

April 24, 1865, his term of service having expired, he was 
discharged at New York. 



SIGNAL QUARTERMASTER. 

ELKANAH BINNEY. 

Born in Hingham, Oct. 18, 1813. 

Jan. 6, 1862, shipped in the U. S. Navy, at New York, as 
seaman for three years. Sent on board the U. S. steamer 
" Oneida," ten guns, and joined the fleet off the mouth of the 
Mississippi River. 

April 18 to 24, 1862, took part in the famous passage of the 
Mississippi and bombardment and capture of Forts Jackson and 
St. Philip, the Chalmette Battery, and New Orleans. 

April 25, rated signal quartermaster. 

May 18, 1862, the "Oneida" arrived off Vicksburg, Miss., and 
demanded its surrender. 

June 28, 1862, he took part in the engagement at Vicksburg, 
passing up the river. 

July 15, 1862, took part in the passage of the Vicksburg bat- 
teries, going down the river, and engagement with the rebel ram 
"Arkansas." 



3o6 BINGHAM IN THE CIVIL WAR. 

September, 1862, the " Oneida" was ordered to the blockade 
off Mobile. 

Aug. 5, 1864, this vessel, lashed beside the U. S. steamer 
" Galena," took part in the memorable entrance into Mobile Bay 
by Rear-admiral Farragut, and capture of the rebel ram " Tennes- 
see," steamer " Sslma," the sinking of the steamer " Gaines," 
and capture of Forts Gaines and Powell. 

The " Oneida " was struck a number of times, and finally re- 
ceived a shot in her starboard boiler which disabled her, causing 
the steam to escape, and scalding several of the officers and 
crew. The commander was very severely wounded. 

In this engagement Binncy was slightly wounded. Feb. 25, 
1865, his term of service having expired, he was discharged. 

SIGNAL QUARTERMASTER. 

SAMUEL NEWCOMB, 2D. 

Born in Hingliam, July 9, 1825. 

June 8, 1854, he was transferred from Co. D, Fourth Regiment 
Mass. Cavalry, at Hilton Head, S.C , to the U. S. Navy, as 
seaman, and sent on board the U. S. receiving-ship " Ver- 
mont." 

July 8, 1864, ordered on board the U. S. barque " Braziliera," 
eight guns, of the South Atlantic blockading squadron, then 
stationed on the blockade off St. Andrew's and St. Simon's 
Sounds. Shortly after joining the " Braziliera," he was rated 
captain of the after-guard. October, 1864, again rated to signal 
quartermaster, and served in this capacity until the end of the 
cruise. 

March, 1865, the " Braziliera" was ordered North. 

April, 1865, Newcomb was sent, with the rest of the 
crew, on board the U. S. receiving-ship " Princeton," at 
Philadelphia, from which he was granted leave, and came to 
Hingham. After a short stay at home, he returned to the 
" Princeton," and was sent on board the U. S. supply steamer 
" South Carolina," and made the trip to Pensacola and return, 
stopping at intermediate ports. 



THE NAVY. 



307 



Aug. 26, 1S65, his term of service having expired, he was dis- 
charged at Philadelphia. 

FIRST-CLASS FIREMAN. 

ALDEN LINCOLN. 

Born in Hingham, March 13, 1829. 

June 25, 1862, shipped in the U. S. Navy, at Boston, for three 
years, as first-class fireman, and was sent the U. S.^ receiving- 
ship " Oliio." 

July 3, 1862, ordered to the U. S. steamer "Genesee," eight 
guns, attached to the North Atlantic blockading squadron, 
stationed on the James River. 

Sept. I, 1862, the "Genesee" was stationed on the blockade 
off Wilmington, N.C. 

February, 1863, the "Genesee " was ordered to the West Gulf 
blockading squadron. 

March 13, 1863, she arrived at Profit Island, Mississippi 
River. 

March 17, 1863, at night, this vessel, lashed to the U. S. steam- 
sloop " Richmond," attempted the passage of the Port Hudson 
batteries. On this occasion the officers and crew of the 
" Genesee " were especially commended, in the official despatches, 
for rescuing the officers and crew of the U. S. steam-frigate 
*' Mississippi" (burned), and saving the "Richmond" from shar- 
ing a like fate, after her engines were disabled. 

From tliis time until Port Hudson surrendered, the " Gen- 
esee " took part in the various engagements for its reduc- 
tion. 

Aug. 15, 1863, the ''Genesee" was sent to the blockade off 
Mobile ; where she remained until the passage of the forts in 
August, 1864, when she was stationed outside in reserve, to 
prevent rebel vessels from escaping seaward. 

July 13, 1865, Lincoln was discharged at New Orleans, La., 
and granted passage North, his term of service having expired. 



39 



3o8 HINGHAM IN THE CIVIL WAR. 

GEORGE ALEXANDER GROVER. 

Born in Charlestown, Mass., Jan. 24, 1846; a resident of Kingham. 

Oct. 21, 1863, shipped in the U. S. Navy, at Boston, ;is second- 
class fireman for one year, and was sent on board the U. S. 
receiving-ship "Ohio." 

Dec. 6, 1863, ordered to the U. S. steamer "Acacia," four 
guns, attached to the East Gulf blockading squadron, 

Jan. I, 1864, rated to first-class fireman. 

Dec. 23, 1864, took part in the capture of the blockade- 
runner "Julia," loaded with cotton, in Alligator Creek, S.C. On 
this vessel he came North, as one of the prize-crew, and acted in 
the capacity of engineer. 

Jan. 21, 1865, his term of service having expired, he was dis- 
charged at Boston, Mass. 

* DANIEL STODDER LINCOLN. 

SEAMAN. 

WILLIAM ELDREDGE. 

Born in Provincetown, Mass., Sept. 25, 1809; a resident of Hingham. 

Shipped June 8, 1 861, in the U. S. Navy, at New Bedford, Mass., 
as seaman for three years, and was sent on board the U. S. ship 
" Vincennes," ten guns, attached to the West Gulf blockading 
squadron. 

In March, 1863, he was ordered to the U. S. Naval Hospital, 
at New Orleans, and thence North to New York City, where, on 
the 29th of May, 1863, he was discharged for disability. 

*JOHN WILLIAM GARDNER. 

GEORGE E. RICHARDSON. 

Served for the quota of Hingham. 
Transferred at Boston, Mass., April 15, 1864, from the Third 



THE NAVY. 



309 



Mass. Heavy Artillery, to the U. S. Navy, as seaman, and was 
sent on board the U. S. steamer "Massasoit," ten guns, 
attachec! to the North Atlantic blockading squadron. 

ORDINARY SEAMEN. 

GEORGE ANTHONY CHUBBUCK. 

Eorn in Scituate. July g, 1S44; a resident of Hingham. 

Transferred July 25, 1864, from the Third Unattached Company 
Massachusetts Heavy Artillery, at Fort Berry, Va., to the 
United States Navy, as ordinary seaman, and was sent on 
board the United States receiving-ship " Princeton," at Phila- 
delphia. 

About three weeks after, was removed to the United States 
steamer " Glaucus," nine guns, employed in convoying the Cali- 
fornia mail-steamers through the West Indies. Returning North, 
the " Glaucus " struck on Molasses Key, and was got off after 
throwing overboard the guns and a portion of the cargo. She 
then put into Inagua for repairs. Shortly after leaving this port, 
she lost her rudder, and with some difficulty succeeded in reach- 
ing Key West. 

July, 1865, Chubbuck was assigned to the United States 
schooner " Mather Vassar," two guns. 

Discharged at Philadelphia, Aug. 19, 1865, by reason of expi- 
ration of term of enlistment. 

WILLIAM GRAY GUSHING, Jun. 

Born in Hingham, Nov. 7, 1836. 

Aug. 15, i86r, shipped in the United States Navy, at Boston, as 
ordinary seaman, for one year, and was sent on board the 
United States barque " Gemsbok," seven guns. 

On the 22d of September, i86r, the " Gemsbok" captured the 
schooner '• Mary E. Pindar." On the 3d of October she cap- 
tured the schooner " Beverly," and on the 20th of the same 
month the brig " Ariel." 



3IO 



HINGTIAM IN THE CIVIL WAR. 



April 25, 1862, in the same vessel, Gushing was present in the 
bombardment and capture of Fort Macon and Beaufort, N.C. 

April 26, 1862, the "Gemsbok" captured the ship "Gondor" 
and barque " Glenn." Gushing continued in the service till 
Auirust 1862. 

BENJAMIN HATGHFIELD. 

July 27, 1861, shipped in the United States Navy, at Boston, as 
ordinary seaman, for three years, and was sent on board the 
United States receiving-ship " Ohio." 

In August, 1 86 1, he was taken to Washington, D.G., and in 
the December following was assigned to the United States iron- 
clad " Louisville," thirteen guns, attached to the Mississippi 
squadron. 

Jan. 10 and 11, 1863, on board this vessel, took part in the 
bombardment and capture of the rebel works at Arkansas Post, 
Arkansas River. 

April 17, 1S63, was present in the bombardment and passage 
of the Vicksburg batteries. 

April 29 to May 3, he shared in the bombardment and cap- 
ture of the rebel works at Grand Gulf, Mississippi River. 

Discharged at Mound Gity, III, Aug. 24, 1864, by reason of 
expiration of term of service. 

DANIEL STODDER. 

Shipped in the United States Navy, at Boston, June 24, 1862, as 
ordinary seaman, for two years, and was sent on board receiv- 
ing ship " Ohio." From this vessel he was shortly transferred 
to the United States steamer " Gonewaugh," nine guns, 
stationed off Gharleston, S.G., engaged in enforcing the block- 
ade. 

In March, 1864, the "Gonewaugh" was sent to join the West 
blockading squadron, 'stationed off Mobile. Discharged July 22, 
1864, by reason of expiration of term of service. 



THE NAVY. 311 

THOMAS R. MURPHY. 

Shipped at Boston, May 19, 1S63, in the United States Navy, as 
ordinary seaman, for one year, and was sent on board the 
receiving-ship " Ohio." Shortly after, transferred to the 
United States barque " Ethan Allen," nine guns, attached lo 
the West Gulf blockading-squadron. 

Discharged at Philadelphia, June 29, 1864, his term of service 
having expired. 

COAL-HEAVER. 

ISAAC MURRAY DOW. 

Born in South Boston, Oct. 3, 1S39 ; a resident of Hingham. 

Shipped Jan. 2, 1S64, in the United States Navy, at Boston, as 
coal-heaver, and was sent on board United States steamer 
" Massasoit," four guns, then fitting out at Boston for the 
North Atlantic blockading squadron. 

May 2, 1864, he was removed to the United States Naval PIos- 
pital at Chelsea, Mass. 



LANDSMEN. 

DANIEL DALEY. 
ROBERT FRANCIS HARDY. 

Born in St. Johns, Newfoundland, Sept. 8, 1846 ; a resident of Hingham. 

Shipped at Boston, Mass., Nov. 16, 1863, in the United States 
Navy, as landsman for one year, and was sent on board the 
United States receiving-ship " Ohio," being shortly after 
transferred to the United States transport " Queen," seven 
guns, then fitting out at New York. 

Feb. II, 1864, on board this vessel he took part in the capture 
of the schooners " Louisa" and " Cosmopolite/' off Brazos River 
Bar. 



312 



HINGHAM IN THE CIVIL WAR. 



In March of the same year, he was sent on board the United 
States iron-clad " Passaic, "two guns, stationed off Charleston, 
S.C., and participated in numerous engagements with the ene- 
my's forts and batteries. 

His term of service expired Jan. 6, 1865, and he was dis- 
charged at Philadelphia. Since lost at sea. 

EDWARD GOTTCPIELL. 

Born in Ireland, Aug 17, 1845 ; a resident of Hingham. 

Shipped in the United States Navy, Nov. 28, 1863, at Boston, as 
landsman, for one year, and was sent on board the United 
States receiving-ship " Ohio." 

Soon after was assigned to the United States transport 
" Queen," seven guns, at New York City. 

Feb. II, 1864, took part in the capture of the schooners 
" Louisa " and " Cosmopolite," off Brazos River Bar. 

In the following March he was placed on board the U. S. 
iron-clad " Passaic," two guns, stationed off Charleston, S. C, 
and here shared in numerous engagements with the forts and 
batteries of the enemy. 

Discharged Jan, 7, 1865, at Philadelphia, his term of service 
having expired. 

BENJAMIN LINCOLN JONES. 

Born in Hingham, Nov. 22, 1832. 

Shipped Aug. 9, 1862, in the U. S. Navy, at Boston, Mass., 
for one year, as landsman, and was taken on board the U. S. 
receiving-ship " Ohio." 

Shortly after, with others, was transferred to the U. S. receiv- 
ing-ship " North Carolina," at New York, and in about four 
weeks was again transferred to the U. S. receiving-ship 
" Brandywine," at Hampton Roads. 

In November, 1862, was assigned, with others, to the U. S. 
steamer " Hetzel," and in her sailed for Little Washington, 
N.C., where he was taken on board the U. S. steamer " Louisi- 
ana," five guns. 



THE NAVY. . 313 

April I to 18, with the "Louisiana," he shared in repulsing 
the attack and siege of Little Washington. 

Sept. 9, 1863, his term of service having expired, he was dis- 
charged at Little Washington, and granted passage North. 

* GEORGE HOWARD MERRITT. 

DANIEL JOSEPH THOMPSON. 

Born in Hingham, March 12, 1849. 

Jan. 28, 1864, shipped in the U. S. Navy, at Boston, for one 
year, as landsman, and was sent on board receiving-ship 
"Ohio." 

March 24, 1864, Thompson was discharged by special order, 
upon requisition of his father, he being under age. 

HENRY TROWBRIDGE. 

Born in Hingham, July 14, 1842. 

Shipped Aug. 9, 1862, in the U. S. Navy, at Boston, for one 
year, as landsman, and was sent on board the U. S. receiving- 
ship " Ohio." . 

Soon after, with others, was transferred to the \5. S. receiving- 
ship " North Carolina," at New York, and in about four weeks 
was assigned to the U. S. receiving-ship " Brandywine," at 
Hampton Roads. 

In November, 1862, again changed to the U. S. steamer 
" Hetzel" he sailed for Little Washington, and was there trans- 
ferred to the U. S. steamer " Louisiana," five guns. 

From the ist to the i8th of April, 1863, he took part in repuls- 
ing the attack and siege of Little Washington. 

Sept. 9, 1863, his term of service having expired, he was dis- 
charged at Little Washington, and granted passage home. 

WILLIAM BURTES. 

40 



314 



HJKGHAM IN THE CIVIL WAR. 



HINGHAM MEN IN THE NAVY ACCORDING TO RANK. 

OFFICERS. 

Charles Harding Loring. Edward Welles Halcro. 

Thomas Andrews. Charles Mason Fuller. 

Andrew Tower. Charles Anderson Stewart. 

Franklin Nickerson. John Means Trussell. 

Augustus Barnes. 

WARRANT OFFICERS. 

Frederick Clinton Blair. Elkanah Binney. 

Alfred B. Whiting. Samuel Newcomb, 2d. 

Charles Campbell. Alden Lincoln. 

Henry Winslow Hersey. George Alexander Grovei. 

Daniel Stodder Lincoln. 

SEAMEN. 

William Eldredge. John William Gardner. 

George E. Richardson. 

ORDINARY SEAMEN. 

George Anthony Chubbuck. Benjamin Hatchfield. 

William Gray Gushing, jun. Daniel Stodder. 

Thomas R. Murphy. 

COAL-HEAVER. 

Isaac Murray Dow. 

LANDSMEN. 

Daniel Daley. Benjamin Lincoln Jones. 

Robert Francis Fardy. George Howard Merritt. 

Edward Gottchell. Daniel Joseph Thompson. 

Henry Trowbridge. 

UNKNOWN. 

William Burtes. 




-''7 



CHAPTER XVIII. 



IN MEMORIAM. 



Soldiers and Sailors who were Natives, Residents, or otherwise connected with Hingham, who 
died in the Service, or Prior to the Erection of the Monument — Biographical Sketches. 

TO perpetuate the names of those persons who were ac- 
credited to the quota of Hingham, and of those natives of 
the town serving elsewhere, who lost their lives in battle or by 
disease contracted in the service during the late civil war, is the 
special object of the present chapter. To this end, the leading 
circumstances and events of their early history have been ob- 
tained, as far as possible, and, with their military record and heroic 
self-sacrifices, are introduced in brief biographical sketches, in 
the hope of making bright in the eyes of future generations 
their example of ardent patriotism and of devotion, even unto 
death, to the principles of human rights and freedom. 

There is a voice in the memory of the dead who have died in 
a noble cause, and an influence in their history, however humble, 
which thrill and inspire us at the mention of their acts of hero- 
ism and valor. They may linger, perhaps, only in the name of 
a revolutionary patriot, like Warren ; or they may fade into 
the mist of legend and tradition like the grand story of Ther- 
mopylae ; yet they are the natural sources from which flow the 
poetic animation, the national pride, and the patriotic fire, that 
mark and make an advanced, high-minded, and spirited people 
with firm principles and lofty aims. 

With this thought, we have placed on record the story of men, 
who, from the everyday walks of life, rose by the glorious steps 



3l6 I 11 NG HAM IN THE CIVIL IV A K. 

of service and sacrifice to the exalted rank of a nation's heroes. 
They sleep in quiet graves. Their lives were cut off like early- 
blossoms. With a pale face and quickly beating heart the quiet 
citizen, the eager schoolboy, the son of fond father and i^other, 
enlisted. A waving of the hat, the brushing aside a tear, were 
all that marked the parting. There was the lithesome step on 
the march, the buoyant spirit in the camp, the gallant bearing on 
the field of battle. But with the blight of disease or the crack 
of the rifle, all was over. Some are resting in Southern dust. 
The remains of others were tenderly brought home, and by lov- 
ing hands committed to their native turf. All was over in one 
sense ; but in another and a grander sense, life only passed into 
a more glorious life, into the fabric of a higher national life, into 
the temple of a loftier national virtue and purity, into the very 
arch of the cause of Christian humanity, cemented with their 
sacred blood. 

" Patriots have toiled, and in their country's cause 
Bled nobly ; and their deeds, as they deserve, 
Receive proud recompense. We give in charge 
Their names to the sweet lyre. The historic Muse, 
Proud of lier treasure, marches with it down 
To latest times ; and Sculpture, in her turn. 
Gives bond, in stone and ever-during brass, 
To guard them, and immortalize her trust." 





C^Oi^^t^ 




IN ME MORI AM. 317 

JOHN ALBION ANDREW. 

[Communicated.] 

Hingham has the proud distinction of having been the home 
of John Albion Andrew, governor of Massachusetts during the 
entire period of the rebellion, and of now, in accordance with the 
wish he once expressed before the citizens of Hingham, tenderly 
cherishing in her soil his sacred ashes. It is fitting that his 
name should stand at the head of the list of her heroic dead. 

It is unnecessary, in the scope of the present work, to give 
more than the barest biographical outline of one whose life and 
services are already a part of the national literature, imprinted 
on its brightest pages. He was born, of worthy New England 
stock, at South Windham, in the State of Maine, May 31. 1818. 
The comfortable circumstances of his father procured him a 
good academical education and a collegiate course at Brunswick. 
He was a glad, wholesome, noble boy, with open face and curly 
head, and a brave, generous, and buoyant heart, fond of history, 
reading widely, with a taste for poetry and elegant literature, 
with no exalted rank as a plodding scholar, but with always a. 
tendency towards broad views and humane sentiments. Even 
in those days, the anti-slavery cause had touched his heart ; and 
the faint whisper of the approaching storm was awakening his 
pulses to that love of freedom and respect for human rights 
which so signally found expression in his later life. 

In 1837 Andrew entered the law-office of Henry H. Fuller, 
Esq., of Boston. He there pursued for twenty years the ordinary 
course of his profession, making now and then a stump-speech 
or a literary oration, and constantly rising in practice and repu- 
tation. In December, 1848, he married Eliza Jones Hersey of 
this town, whom he had met at an anti-slavery fair in Boston ; 
and from that period, for a great part- of the time, he resided in 
Hingham. Here was his home, here children were born unto 
him, here he walked to church, and sang the familiar hymns, and 
taught the Sunday-school. Here his rare and sweet social quaU- 
ties surrounded him with friends who loved and admired him ; 



3i8 HINGHAM IN THE CIVIL WAR. 

and here his generous nature, his fondness for natural scenery, 
his love of children, and his strong social attachments, brought 
him some of the happiest hours of his life. 

While residing in Hingham, Andrew was nominated for State 
senator, but defeated. He had as yet had no entrance into polit- 
ical service. Nevertheless, he was daily becoming better known 
as an intelligent advocate of progress, and for his strong anti- 
slavery sentiments. In 1854 he bravely defended the parties 
arrested for the rescue of Anthony Burns, and in 1857 was 
chosen to the General Court as representative of the Sixth 
Ward of Boston In this arena he rose at once to distinction. 
Brought into conflict with Caleb Cushing, one of the astutest and 
most powerful debaters and thinkers of the whole country, he 
carried off the victory in the bitter struggle over the removal of 
Judge Loring. In 1859 he unflinchingly presided at the stormy 
meeting in Tremont Temple, for the relief of John Brown's 
suffering family, declaring, that, whether Brown's enterprise at 
Harper's Ferry were right or wrong, " John Brown himself is 
right." In i860 he was a delegate to the Chicago presidential 
convention, and contributed all his influence to the nomination 
of Abraham Lincoln ; and in 1861, having been elected by a 
sort of spontaneous impulse of the heart of the Commonwealth, 
as the one fit man for its magistracy, took his seat as governor 
of the State. In April, the rebellion already at its outburst, 
came the call for arms ; and, as if Providence had raised him up 
for the place, Andrew responded to it with that electric prompt- 
ness, that magnetic fervor, that soulful devotion, which, from 
that day forward till the end of the war, animated him under all 
circumstances, and imparted to the people at large the enthusi- 
asm of his own ardent nature. His great heart breathed in that 
now historic telegram to the Mayor of Baltimore, " I pray you 
to let the bodies of our Massachusetts soldiers, dead in Balti- 
more, be laid out, preserved in ice, and tenderly sent forward by 
express to me." 

Unsuspected powers at once put forth in him, his public 
addresses thrilled with loftier notes, his executive energies ex- 
panded to the widest limit of his countless duties and labors ; 
the quiet citizen and plodding lawyer budded in a day into the 



IN ME MORI AM. 



319 



grandest measure of the statesman and leader ; and it seemed 
almost a dream that our good-humored neighbor was indeed the 
foremost governor in the Union, the most chivalrous, if not the 
greatest, civilian of the war. At the assembling of loyal gover- 
nors at Altoona, Pa., Sept. 24, 1862, his was the leading spirit 
that urged new vigor in the prosecution of the campaign. 
When negro regiments began to be formed, he was among the 
first to organize them, prescient of their efficiency and gallantry 
in the field. In all that could stimulate the soul of the nation, 
in all that could wake its patriotic fire, yet none the less in the 
most watchful care of the home interests of the State, of its 
institutions of charity and correction, he was always foremost ; 
and the activity of his life and labors was almost superhuman. 
Says the Rev. Dr. Clarke, " He worked like the great engine in 
the heart of a steamship." 

With the war, his term of office as governor expiring, he 
resumed the practice of the law. In 1866 he was chosen presi- 
dent of the New England Historic-Genealogical Society. In 
1 867, with the same bravery and heroism that had marked him 
thitherto, though against the judgment of many of his friends, he 
began his strenuous and able assaults upon the prohibitory law 
of the State. All this time his broad national reputation, his 
great popularity, his sound judgment, his conciliatory and liberal 
sentiments, were marking him as the coming man in the national 
councils. It seemed as if years of new usefulness lay before him. 
But he had finished his work. 

On the 30th of October, 1867, he died at his residence in Bos- 
ton. His remains were afterwards brought to Hingham ; and on 
the 30th of October, 1869, after solemn services in the New 
North Church, at which he had formerly been an attendant, his 
Boston pastor, JaVnes Freeman Clarke, pronouncing the address, 
he was buried in our cemetery, near its crest, and not far from 
the Soldiers' Monument. At his feet are the village he loved, the 
branches under which he sauntered, and the picturesque stretch 
of the bay over which he had so many times gone to and from 
his home. He rests at scarce the distance of the sound of the 
voice from the threshold on which he stood, when on the 3d of 
September, i860, he addressed his fellow-citizens of Hingham, 



320 HINGHAM IN THE CIVIL WAR. 

who had come to congratulate him on his nomination as gover- 
nor, and in the course of his remarks spoke these hearty words : 

" I confess to you, my old neighbors, associates, and kins-people 
of Hingham, that I could more fitly speak by tears than by words 
to-night. From the bottom of ray heart for this unsought, en- 
thusiastic, and cordial welcome, I thank you. I understand — 
and this thought lends both sweetness and pathos to the emo- 
tions of the hour, — I am here to-night among neighbors, who for 
the moment are all agreed to differ and all consenting to agree. 

" How dear to my heart are these fields, these spreading trees, 
this verdant grass, this sounding shore, when now for fourteen 
years, through summer heat and sometimes through winter 
storms, I have trod your streets, rambled through your woods, 
sauntered by your shores, sat by your firesides, and felt the warm 
pressure of your hands, sometimes teaching your children in the 
Sunday-school, sometimes speaking to my fellow-citizens, always 
with the cordial friendship of those who differ from me often- 
times in what they thought the radicalism of my opinions. Here 
• — here I have found most truly a home for the soul free from 
the cares and turmoil and responsibilities of a careful and anxious 
profession. Away from the busier haunts of men, it has been 
given to me here to find a calm and sweet retreat. Here too, 
dear friends, I have found the home of my heart. It was into 
one of your families that I entered, and joined myself in holy 
bonds of domestic love to one of the daughters of your town. 
Here, too, I have first known a parent's joys and a parent's 
sorrows. Whether you say Aye or No to my selection, John A. 
Andrew is ever your friend." 

Gov. Andrew, when in Hingham, lived on the east side of 
Main Street, in the first house northerly from Water Street, in 
the Hinckley house on the same and in the Thaxter house on 
the opposite side of Main Street, in the old Hersey house on 
Summer Street, overlooking the blue water and sweet with the 
fragrance of clover fields, and also m the Bates house on South 
Street. His habits, like his nature, were simple. He loved to 
driv-e and walk ; he enjoyed the breezy trips and neighborly chat 
of the steamer ; his heart went out to children and won them ; 
he was especially fond of conversation, full of anecdote and 



IN MEMORIAM. 



321 



story, and not averse to controversial discussion. His humor 
and cheer were always abundant. He sang old psalms, he recit- 
ed noble poems that dwelt in his memory, 'he was running over 
with the quaint history of old times and odd characters, and to 
the last there never faded in his breast the warm, glad enthusi- 
asm of boyhood. His sympathies were touched as quickly as 
a girl's : each year he went to Maine to stand beside the grave of 
his mother ; each day some sad woman or poor boy thanked 
him for his humanity, for in him the unfortunate always had a 
helper and a friend. No heart less generous could have uttered 
those memorable words that expressed his great and genuine 
humanity : " I know not what record of sin may await me in 
another world ; but this I do know, I never was mean enough to 
despise a man because he was poor, because he was ignorant, or 
because he was black." Add to all this his incorruptibility and 
honesty, his fiery patriotism, his unswerving sense of right and 
wrong, his pure glow in act and word, and we may trust, that, 
as his monument rises over his grave, it will point to the 
example of purposes so lofty, of a soul so magnanimous, and a 
mind so sound, that it will be like a beacon-light to guide the 
way of future generations to the like achievement of the fulness 
of a noble life. 

J. D. L. 



THOMAS ANDREWS. 

Acting-master in the U. S. Navy, died at New Orleans, La., 
Feb. 27, 1S65, of consumption, aged forty-eight years, eight 
months, eighteen days. 

Thomas Andrews, born in Hingham, June 9, 18 16, was the 
youngest son of David and Betsey (Sargent) Andrews, and a 
descendant from Thomas Andrews, an early resident of this 
town. Among his paternal ancestors were Capt. Thomas 

Andrews, of Sir William Phips's Canada expedition ; and Lieut. 

41 



322 H INGHAM IN THE CIVIL WAR. 

Thomas Andrews, who was son of the captain. There also 
were patriotic families on the maternal side. 

After receiving instruction at the public and private schools 
of the town, the subject of this sketch entered the merchant 
service, and before the expiration of his minority was appointed 
chief officer of a ship. He subsequently commanded several 
square-rigged vessels, in which he made voyages to the East 
Indies and other foreign countries. 

Oct. 29, 1 86 1, he was appointed acting-master in the U. S. 
Navy, and shortly after was ordered to the U. S. store-ship 
" Vermont," then fitting out at Boston. In the " Vermont " he 
made the memorable passage to Port Royal, S.C., during which, 
in a severe gale, the ship parted with two steamers sent to con- 
voy her, and lost rudder and most of her sails. She was finally 
found, and towed into port, having been at sea over forty days. 

Shortly after her arrival, Mr. Andrews was ordered to the 
command of the U. S. transport " Courier," then running be- 
tween Port Royal and New York. 

Jan. I, 1863, finds him in command of the U. S. steamer 
" Crusader," seven guns, attached to the North Atlantic block- 
ading squadron. In this vessel he was engaged in the arduous 
duty of enforcing the blockade, as well as in numerous other 
expeditions, including the attack on West Point, Va., April 15, 
1863. 

•Jan. I, 1864, he was doing duty on board the U. S. screw- 
sloop " Pensacola," twenty-six guns, attached to the West Gulf 
blockading squadron, and stationed at New Orleans, La. 

In F"ebruary he returned to Hingham in feeble health, and 
remained here several months incapacitated for active service. 

Dec. 19, 1864, he was re-appointed acting-master in the U. S. 
Navy, and ordered to New Orleans for duty on the West Gulf 
blockading squadron. His health, however, continued to fail ; 
and he died at the Naval Rendezvous, as previously stated. 

His remains were embalmed, and sent to Hingham. Appro- 
priate services were held at the New North Meeting-house, 
after which the body was buried in the family lot in the Hingham 
Cemetery. 
• He left a widow and two children. 



IN MEMOKIAM. 



GEORGE BAILEY. 



323 



Corp. George Bailey was a member of Co. I of the Fifty-sixth 
Regiment, M. V. I., three years, and was mustered March i, 
1864. 

In the absence of the details of his war-record, the following 
facts make up all of his history wnich can now be given. He 
appears to have enlisted from Boston for the quota of Hingham, 
was about thirty years of age, and received the amount of bounty- 
money paid to soldiers at the time of entering the service. 

His career was brief. Joining the Army of the Potomac in 
April, the regiment to which he was attached took part in the 
battle of the Wilderness when Col. Griswold was killed ; next at 
Spottsylvania; then at North Anna, Bethesda Church, Cold 
Harbor, and lastly at Petersburg, where on the 17th of June, 
according to the report of the adjutant-general, in a brave and 
successful charge on the enemy's line, he fell in the cause for 
which he had imperilled his life to defend and preserve, having 
had a short but active service of three months. 



JAMES BALLENTINE. 

The subject of this sketch was born in Roscommon County, 
Ireland, April, 1842. His parents were William and Catharine 
(Ward) Ballentine. 

A laborer by occupation, and but eighteen years of age, he 
left Hingham in May, 1 860, prior to the outbreak of the rebel- 
lion, for the purpose of entering the regular service of the 
United States. The officer under whom he enlisted was con- 
nected with the Third Infantry, then stationed at the Ringold 
Barracks on the Rio Grande, Texas ;. and our young recruit was 
ordered to this locality. Soon after the beginning of the war, 
they were besieged by the enemy, and an effort was made to 
escape by water. The vessel, however, was captured, and the 
entire command taken prisoners. 



324 HINGHAM IN THE , CIVIL WAR. 

An invitation to volunteer in the cause of secession was 
declined to a man, and all were paroled and sent to New York. 
From some cause, the parole was not recognized. The Irish 
Brigade was then recruiting ; and an officer from Boston visited 
the regiment, and organized a body of men for a troop of dra- 
goons to be attached to the brigade. No cavalry, however, being 
required, guns were furnished by the State, and the regiment, 
or brigade, was known as the Fifteenth Independent ; Mr. Bal- 
lentine being of the number, and claiming that, though enlisted 
ill the State of New York, he was serving for the State of 
Massachusetts. 

After organizing, the battery joined the Army of the Potomac, 
and was in the battles of Antietam, Gettysburg, siege of Peters- 
burg, and at other localities. 

The battery was detailed for the purpose of cutting off the 
Weldon Railroad, and thus preventing the transport of supplies 
for the enemy. At the engagement which here occurred, young 
Ballentine was stationed at the extreme front, and the ranks suf- 
fered terribly. From early morning he worked steadily and 
bravely at his gun, notwithstanding the almost universal car- 
nage ; but at two o'clock of the afternoon he was stricken in the 
breast by a solid shot, and fell. His death was instantaneous, 
and without a struggle. 

Capt.~ Hart, who commanded the battery, speaks in warm 
terms of the courage and bravery of this young soldier. 



HOSEA ORCUTT BARNES. 

Hosea Orcutt Barnes, whose name is upon the Soldiers' and 
Sailors' Monument, son of Elisha J. and Harriet A. (Peakes) 
Barnes of Boston, was born in Scituate, Mass., June 13, 1842. 
He joined the Tenth Light Battery, under Capt. J. Henry 
Sleeper, and was mustered as private, Sept. 9, 1862 

During the time young Barnes was connected with the bat- 
tery, it was engaged at Kelley's Ford, Mine Run, Po River, 
Spottsylvania, and North Anna. 



IN MEMOKIAM. 



325 



May 30, 1864, the battery went into position on the south side 
of Pamunkey River, at a place called Jones' Farm, and was about 
to engage the enemy, when a detachment of four men was sent 
to cut down a tree which stood in a position that prevented 
accurate firing. The men returned, and reported that it could 
not be accomplished by reason of exposure to- the enemy's 
sharpshooters. Private Barnes then volunteered to perform the 
duty, and had removed the obstruction when he received his 
death-wound. 

He was a promising young man, and a favorite with all who 
knew him. 

A marble tablet, erected over his remains in the Hingham 
cemetery, bears the inscription : — 

HOSEA O. BARNES, 

MEMBER OF 

lOTH BATT., MASS. VOLS., 

KILLED AT 

JONES' FARM, VA., 
May 30, 1864. 

AGED 21 YEARS II MONTHS. 



OUR LOVED ONE SLEEPS 
FOR HIS country's FLAG. 



CHARLES EUGENE BATES. 

Charles Eugene Bates, born in Cohasset, Dec. 16, 1837, was a 
son of Charles and Clara (Turner) Bates, and a descendant of 
Clement Bates, one of the first settlers of Hingham. He was a 
resident of Scituate at the time of enlistment, and by occupa- 
tion a boatman. 

Joining the first quota of Hingham, under recruiting-officer 
Edward Cazneau, he was mustered as a private in Co. G of the 



326 HINGHAM IN THE CIVIL WAR. 

Thirty-ninth Regiment, M. V. I., Sept. 2, 1862. This regiment 
was not brought into any general battle for more than eighteen 
months after it left Massachusetts, having been employed upon 
other important duties. Its first engagement, according to the 
annual report of the adjutant-general, was May 5, 1864. In its 
second engagement (Sunday morning, May 8, 1864), young Bates 
was wounded in the left arm during a charge upon the enemy's 
breastworks at the commencement of the battle of Laurel Hill. 
He was immediately taken to the field hospital, and thence to 
Jarvis Hospital, in Baltimore, Md., where, after partially recovering, 
he volunteered to serve as nurse for those who were greater suf- 
ferers than himself. In the performance of this duty, he con- 
tracted diphtheria, from which, on the 2d of November, he died. 
Dr. D. C. Peters, U.S.A., the surgeon in charge of the hospital, 
paid a warm tribute to his memory ; and the nurses passed a 
series of resolutions expressive of sorrow and sympathy for the 
parents of the deceased. 

Private Bates possessed many excellent traits of character. 
Brave and true as a soldier, thoughtful of others, forgetful of 
self, and patient when suffering, he has passed to the higher life. 
His remains were taken to Scituate for burial ; and a headstone 
erected to his memory bears the following inscription : — 

HE IS NOT HERE, HE HAS RISEN. 

CHARLES EUGENE BATES, 

Died Nov., 1864, 

IN- THE SERVICE OF HIS 
COUNTRY, 

IN THE 39TH REGT., MASS. VOL., 
AGED 26. 

HE WHO DESTROYETH OUR EARTHLY HOPE 
CALLETH US TO A DIVINER TRUST. 



IN MEMORIAM. 



DANIEL LEAVITT BEAL. 



327 



Private in Co. F, Thirty-second Regiment, M. V. I., three 
years; died July 29, 1864. 

Daniel Leavitt Beal, son of Daniel and Hannah Leavitt (Bur- 
bank) Beal, was born in Cohasset, June 23, 1832. 

On the 17th of March, 1862, he enlisted at Fort Warren for 
the quota of Hingham, and remained at his place till May, 
when he left with the regiment for Washington. June 25, under 
orders to join the Army of the Potomac, he was at Harrison's 
Landing, where the regiment was stationed in line of battle 
throughout the day. 

On the 8th of July he was detailed as provost-guard at Gen. 
Potter's headquarters, where, acting as orderly for Gen. Sykes 
and Col. Locke, he remained till June 24, 1864, when, sick and 
disabled, he was sent to City Point Hospital, where he died of 
fever, aged thirty-two years. 

In addition to the foregoing sketch, a brother of the deceased 
gives the following particulars. Early in May, 1864, he was 
attacked with night blindness, and also suffered at the time from 
diarrhoea. As surgeons were all engaged at the front, medical 
advice was not easily obtained ; and it was not till the 24th of the 
following June, that the necessary papers for admission to the 
hospital were secured. After reporting from one hospital to 
another, he was at last transferred to the charge of the women 
of the Sanitary Commission. Steadily declining, he soon be- 
came entirely disabled, and finally, from the combined effects of 
typhoid fever and diarrhoea, died as before stated. His remains 
were brought home, and mterred at North Cohasset. 

From the diary of the deceased, it would appear that there 
was a lack of needed attention, want of proper treatment, and, 
at an earlier date, a degree of laborious service demanded which 
he had not the strength to perform. 



'28 HINGHAM IN THE CIVIL WAR. 



WILLIAM HENRY DEAL. 



Private in Co. K of the First Regiment, M. V. I., three years ; 
mustered Aug. 13, 1862 ; mustered out May 25, 1864. 

Re-enlisted from the town of Cohasset, 1864, in Co. A of 
the Twenty-fourth Regiment, M. V. I., three years ; transferred 
to Co. K. 

William Henry Beal was the eldest son of Robert and Chloe 
(Sprague) Beal, and was born in Hingham, Oct. 9, 1841. 

Aug. 13, 1862, he enlisted from the town of Hingham, and 
was mustered as private in Co. K of the First Regiment, 
M. V. I., three years, as before stated. Connected with the 
Army of the Potomac, he was in the battle before Fredericksburg, 
took part in the engagement at Chancellorsville, and in the con- 
flict at Gettysburg was severely wounded in the side by a 
musket-ball. After being in the hospital a short time, he was 
granted a furlough ; and in August, 1863, returned to his home 
in Hingham, where, during the short respite allowed, his health 
was in some measured restored. Rejoining the army, he was dis- 
charged May 25, 1864, at the expiration of his term of enlist- 
ment. 

He subsequently removed to Cohasset, and there in the sum- 
mer of 1864 re-enlisted, entering the service as private in Co. 
A of the Twenty-fourth Regiment, M. V. I., three years. 

After the close of the war, he still suffered from the effects 
of the wound received at the battle of Gettysburg, and, indeed, 
never regained the measure of health and vigor enjoyed at the 
time of entering the service. 

Gradually failing, he died of consumption, at the residence of 
his father, at Hingham. Dec. 20, 1865, aged twenty -four years. 

He was a laborer, and unmarried. 



GEORGE W. BIBBY. 

Member of Co. I, Lincoln Light Infantry, Fourth Regiment, 
M. V. I., and was three months at Fortress Monroe and 



IN MEMORIAM. 



329 



vicinity, April to July, 1861 ; lieutenant in Co. A of the Thirty- 
second Regiment, M. V. I., three years ; killed while on 
picket-duty, May 30, 1864. 

After returning from Fortress Monroe, Mr. Bibby enlisted at 
Hingham, Oct. 31, 1861, as sergeant in Co. A of the Thirty- 
second Regiment^ as before stated, and the same day was regu- 
larly mustered into service. 

Aug. 21, 1862, he was promoted second lieutenant ; and Aug. 
22, 1863, commissioned first lieutenant. 

In the Army of the Potomac with the Thirty-second, Lieut. 
Bibby fought in the battles at Malvern Hill, Gaines' Mill, Second 
Bull Run, Antietam, Fredericksburg, Chancellorsville, Gettys- 
burg, Rappahannock Station, Mine Run, Wilderness, Spottsylva- 
nia. North Anna, and lastly at Bethesda Church, where, at the 
head of the picket-line of the regiment, he fell mortally wounded 
by a ball from a rebel sharpshooter. 

Gen. Stephenson, in a note to Mrs. Bibby, writes as follows : 
" Your husband was killed while in the discharge of his duty, 
in command of the pickets of the regiment. The ball passed 
through his arm into his body, and he lived but a short time after 
he was struck. I saw him but a few moments before he expired. 
He was buried near the residence of Dr. Brockenborough, on the 
road from Hanover Town to Richmond, about one mile and a 
half from Pamunkey River. . . . Lieut. Bibby had endeared 
himself to the whole command, and by his bravery won the 
respect of all." 

In a similar note addressed to Mrs. Bibby, Col. Prescott bears 
testimony to his heroism and efficiency as an officer, tenders the 
bereaved the heartfelt sympathy of the entire regiment, and 
adds in closing, " You will have the satisfaction of knowing he 
died for his country." 

Funeral services to his memory were held in the Orthodox 
Church at Hingham, Rev. Mr. Parker, Sunday afternoon, June 
19, 1864. 

Lieut. Bibby entered the service of his country, from motives 
of genuine patriotism, and his record of goodness and purity is 
one which will long live in the hearts of those who knew him, 
42 



330 



HINGHAM IN THE CIVIL WAR. 

JOHN H. BLACKMAN, 

MEMBER OF 

CO. H, 12TH REGT., M.V. 

born in dorchester 

June 6, 1842, 

killed at the battle of 
fredericksburg, va., 

Dec. 13, 1862. 
LEMUEL S. BLACKMAN, 

MEMBER OF 

CO. K, IITH REGT., M.V., 

born in dorchester 

Feb. 18, 1840. 

DIED 

June 13, 1870. 



SONS OF LEMUEL S. AND ELIZABETH 
BLACKMAN. 



The above inscription is from a marble stone in the Hingham 
Cemetery, recently erected in memory of two patriotic brothers, 
who sacrificed their lives for the preservation of the Union ; and 
although not upon the quota of Hingham, it seems proper that a 
brief notice of them should appear in this connection. 

John H. Blackmail enlisted at Weymouth, and was mustered 
July 15, 1861. A printed report relating to his death says, " He 
was shot through the head, and instantly expired. His body was 
not recovered from the battle-field." 

Lemuel S. Blackman was mustered June 13, 1 861, and accred- 
ited upon the quota of Dorchester. He was discharged the 29th 
of August following for disability, but never regained his health. 
The mound which marks his grave is annually decorated with 
flowers by Post 104, G. A. R., of this town. 

These young men were at one time residents here, and are 
rsmembered as grandsons of the late Mr. Ebed Hersey. 



IN MEMORIAM. 331 



CHARLES WHITON BLOSSOM. 

Son of Thomas Davis and Susan Allen (Whiton) Blossom was 
born at Chicopee, Mass., June 29, 1840, and died at Hingham, 
Aug. 26, 1862. 

On the 1 2th of July, 1861, he enlisted from Boston as private, 
afterwards promoted corporal in Co. I, known as the Newton 
Guards, of the Sixteenth Regiment, M. V. L, three years, and was 
mustered into the service at Camp Cameron, Cambridge, Mass. 

On the 1 7th of August he left for the seat of war. After a 
brief stay at Baltimore, he was ordered to Fortress Monroe, and 
the winter of 186 1-2 was spent in Camp Hamilton. 

In May, 1862, he was at Gosport, next at Suffolk, Va., and 
afterwards at Fair Oaks, where he took part in the skirmishes, 
and in the more important engagements which occurred from 
the 1 8th to the 28th of the month. 

On the 29th he was again in conflict with the enemy at Glen- 
dale, and lastly took part in the battle at Malvern Hill. In 
these several engagements the Sixteenth sustained a loss of 
more than one hundred and fifty men. 

But protracted marches and the privations of camp-life soon 
told on the strength and health of the young soldier and patriot ; 
and early in August, after a few days spent in the hospital, he 
was discharged from service on account of disability. It was 
just one year from the time he left Massachusetts. Stopping 
a few days at Washington, for rest, he reached Hingham Aug. 
20, 1862. 

From the complete exhaustion that followed, he never rallied ; 
and six days after his arrival home, he "fell asleep," at the 
residence of his father, aged twenty-two years. 

At no time after his return did strength permit him to give 
any facts relating to his personal experience. 

There can, however, be little doubt that his death was caused 
by complete prostration of the system induced by an attack of 
camp-fever, while in service on the Peninsula. 

That he was a young man of exemplary character, dutiful as 



332 HINGHAM IN THE CIVIL WAR. 

a son, beloved as a brother, brave and patriotic as a soldier, and 
as a friend respected and esteemed by all who knew him, is a 
truthful and well deserved tribute to his memory. 

He was buried in the Hingham Cemetery. The stone erected 
.to his memory bears the following inscription : — 

IN MEMORIAM. 

CHARLES W. BLOSSOM, 

CO. I, ICTH REG., MASS. VOLS , 

DIED 

August 26, 1862. 

AGED 22 YEARS 2 MONTHS. 



HE GAVE HIS LIFE TO HIS COUNTRY. 



WILLIAM BREEN. 

Corporal in Co. A of the Thirty-second Regiment ; taken pris- 
oner at Petersburg ; and died at Salisbury, N.C., Nov. 5, 1864. 
Corp. William Breen was born in Hingham, March 12, 1842. 
His parents were John and Susan (Joyce) Breen. 

On the 31st of October, 1861, young Breen enlisted for three 
years in the defence of the cause of freedom and the Union. 
To say that he was connected with the Thirty-second Regiment 
would alone indicate the nature of the service in which he was 
afterwards engaged. The battles of Malvern Hill, Gaines' Mill, 
Second Bull Run, Antietam, Fredericksburg, Chancellorsville, 
Gettysburg, Rappahannock Station, Mine Run, Wilderness, 
Spottsylvania, North Anna, Tolopotomy, Bethesda Church, and 
Weldon Railroad, as a class the most severe that occurred dur- 
ing the war, are included in his brilliant record. At Gettysburg 



IN MEMORIAM. 



m 



he escaped unharmed, though repeatedly struck by musket-balls 
in his equipments and clothing ; but at the battle of Weldon 
Railroad he fell a prisoner into the hands of the enemy, and 
was conveyed to Salisbury, N.C., where he died Nov. 5, 1864, at 
the early age of twenty-two years. 

Bravery and fidelity were prominent characteristics of young 
Breen, and he was often detailed for service where these qualities 
were indispensable. His death was a deep sorrow to relatives 
and friends, who saw in him the promise of a noble manhood 
and a career of honor and usefulness. 



DANIEL HORACE BURR. 

Private in Co. K, Eleventh Regiment, M. V. I. ; killed at the 
battle of Gettysburg Pa., July 2, 1863. 

Daniel Horace Burr, the only son of Daniel and Lucy Lane 
(Andrews) Burr, was born in Hingham, Feb. 19, 1838. Resid- 
ing at Dorchester, Mass., where he worked at his trade of a 
wheelwright when the war broke out, he enlisted in April, 1861, 
for three years ; and June 13, was mustered as private in Co. K, 
of the Eleventh Regiment, M. V. L 

He participated in all the engagements of the regiment dur- 
ing his connection with it ; including the first battle of Bull Run, 
Yorktown, Williamsburg, Fredericksburg, Chancellorsville, and 
Gettysburg. 

In the engagement at Williamsburg, May 5, 1862, he received 
a wound in his thigh which disabled him for duty. He was 
removed to Chesapeake Hospital, Fortress Monroe, and re- 
mained there until the middle of June, when, to make room for 
other patients, he was sent to Dorchester. 

Rejoining his regiment in September, he faithfully performed 
the duties required of a soldier, until' he fell at Gettysburg. 

The colonel of the regiment, in a communication to Gov. An 
drews, said, " Daniel Horace Burr died like a true soldier, with 
his face to the foe." 

His body was never recovered. 



334 HINGHAM IN THE CIVIL WAR. 

JAMES THOMAS CHURCHILL. 

Private in Co. G, Thirty-ninth Regiment, M. V. I., died at An- 
derson ville Prison, Ga., June 23, 1864, aged twenty-three years, 

" Oft o'er that fair and sunny clime the gale hath borne 
The sighs of exiles never to return." 

James Thomas Churchill, the eldest son of James and Cynthia 
(French) Churchill, was born in Hingham, May 9, 1841. 

Leaving his employment of painter and glazier to join the 
first quota of Hingham, he enlisted Aug. ii, 1862, under 
recruiting-officer Edward Cazneau, and was mustered at Lynn- 
field, Sept. 2, as private in Co. G of the Thirty-ninth Regiment, 
M. V. L 

The regiment left Massachusetts early in September for 
Washington, D.C., and during a part of the year following was 
engaged in guard and picket duty in the vicinity of the Potomac. 
July 26, 1863, it became a part of the first brigade, second 
division. First Army Corps. 

When the Army of the Potomac fell back before the enemy, 
Oct. II, 1863, young Churchill, being sick, was left behind with 
others to follow the next day ; but during the night was taken 
prisoner near the Rapidan, and carried to Richmond, thence to 
Belle Isle, and subsequently to Andersonville, Ga. 

Of delicate constitution, he was unable to endure exposure 
and privation, and early fell a victim to the harsh treatment to 
which during his prison-life he was subjected. 

One of his Andersonville companions, in a communication to 
the relatives of the deceased, writes as follows : " We told him of 
his approaching dissolution ; and though he was too weak to 
move on his hands and knees, yet he was full of faith that he 
should live to reach home, and enjoy the society of his relatives 
and friends. 

He left a widow, but no children. 



IN MEMORIAM. 



THOMAS CHURCHILL. 



335 



Thomas Churchill, born in Hingham, Feb. 5, 1808, was a 
twin son of Jesse and Annie (Barrell) Churchill. While a lad 
he lived with Col. Joseph Cushing of this town ; and afterwards 
with Mr. John Leavitt, of whom he learned the trade of pump 
and block maker. At a later period he removed to Boston. 

In the summer of 1861, he enlisted for three years under 
Capt. Lewis N. Tucker of Boston, and Sept. 13 was mustered 
as private in Co. A of the Eighteenth Regiment, M. V. I., in 
which he served principally in the commissary department. 

Before Yorktown, in the expedition under Gen. Stoneman, on 
the march, or in the camp, he filled acceptably the position 
assigned him. 

At Harrison's Landing, Va., he was sick with diarrhoea, from 
which he died on the 7th of August, 1862, aged fifty-four years 
and six months. 



JEREMIAH J. CORCORAN. 

Private in Co. I, Lincoln Light Infantry, Fourth Regiment, 
M. V. I., three months. Private in Co. A of the Fortieth 
Regiment, M. V. I. ; three years. 

Private Jeremiah J. Corcoran resided on Fort-hill Street, and 
was one of the thirty-seven men who enlisted to fill the quota 
required for the Lincoln Light Infantry, and who left Hingham 
on the 1 8th of May, 1861, to join this company, then stationed 
at Fortress Monroe. 

Aug. 23, 1862, he again entered the service, enlisting as pri- 
vate in Co. A of the Fortieth Regiment, M. V. I. ; three years. 
During the autumn he was in the Department of the South ; 
was present in the expedition to Kraivah and the Seabrook 
Islands ; took part in the bombardment of Sumter and Wagner ; 
and in the State of Florida was in the battle of Olustee and at 
Jacksonville. 



336 HINGHAM IN THE CIVIL WAR. 

He afterwards joined the Army of the James, was at Drury's 
Blufif, Bermuda Hundred, and afterwards in other engagements 
prior to that of Cold Harbor. Here on the 3d of June, in a 
determined, but sharply contested advance of the regiment on 
the enemy's lines, he was mortally wounded, and conveyed to 
the hospital, where, lingering till Friday, June 10, he died at 
twenty-eight years of age. 

With the exception of Private Corcoran, the Fortieth Regi- 
ment contained few enlistments from Hingham. Of the severity 
of the service it is not necessary to speak. In South Carohna, 
Florida, and lastly in the Army of the James and the Potomac, 
engagements with the enemy were numerous and severe. 
Through all " Jerry " evaded no duty. His daring, almost reck- 
less bravery constantly impelled him to the front. Fear to him 
was a stranger; and, be the situation what it might, he was one of 
the last to yield. 

" He was a good soldier," is the testimony of his comrades ; 
and as such he fell in the cause of the Union. 



NELSON FRANCIS CORTHELL. 

Corporal in Co. A of the Eighteenth Regiment, M. V. I., died of 
wounds received at the second battle of Bull Run, Va., Aug. 
30, 1862, aged twenty-four years, five months. 

" No jDomp, no funeral rites, no weeping eyes, 
To grace thine obsequies." 

Nelson Francis Corthell, the eldest son of Nelson and Marga- 
ret (Overton) Corthell, was born in Hingham, April i, 1838. He 
was a cooper by trade. Leaving his employment to respond to 
the call for troops, he enlisted under Capt. Lewis N. Tucker of 
Boston, and was mustered at Camp Brigham, Readville, Aug. 
27, 1861. 

Mr. Corthell participated in all the marches, privations, and 
exposures of the regiment. During the siege of Yorktown, he 
was constantly under the fire of the enemy's batteries. 



IN MEMORIAM. 



337 



At the second battle of Bull Run, Mr. Corthell was fatally 
wounded during a charge made by the regiment. His comrades 
made an effort to remove him to a place of safety ; but the 
repulse of our forces obliged them to abandon the undertaking. 
The next day search was made for the body by private William 
W. Robinson of Hingham, and other members of Co. A, but 
without success. 

He left a widow. 



JOHN BROWN CREASE. 

John Brown Crease, whose name is upon the Soldiers' and Sail- 
ors' Monument, son of Rev. Robert and Helen (Brown) 
Crease, was born at Leeth Lumsden, Scotland, May 26, 1839. 

He came to the United States a few years prior to the com- 
mencement of the war, and soon found employment in Hingham. 
Possessed of a fine disposition and attractive manners, he rapid- 
ly made friends in the circle in which he moved. His strong 
religious tendencies and social nature, inherited from good fami- 
ly connections, and early nurtured by pious home influences, 
drew him towards good society in pursuit of social intercourse. 
While here he united with the Baptist Church by baptism ; the 
pastor, Rev. Jonathan Tilson, being one of his most intimate and 
valued friends. 

Shortly before the war, he went to Boston, where he made the 
acquaintance of Rev. Phineas Stowe and other c.istinguished 
men, and was an active member in the Young Men's Christian 
Association. 

He joined the Twenty-second Regiment (Havelock Guards) 
at its organization, and was mustered as private in Co. A, Oct. 4, 
i86r. As a soldier of the army, as well as a follower of his 
religion, he was constant at the post of duty, and served faith- 
fully. 

He was taken sick with typhoid fever before Yorktown, and 
died at Bedloe's Island Hospital, New York Harbor, May 16^ 
1862, aged nearly twenty-three years. Some time after, his 
43 



338 HINGHAM IN THE CIVIL WAR. 

remains were disinterred, and brought to Boston, where appro- 
priate services were held. They were subsequently deposited in 
the Hingham Cemetery. 

In addition to the foregoing, Rev. Jonathan Tilson of this 
town furnishes the following : — 

" John Brown Crease was an only son. His father designed 
that he should follow the same holy calling as himself. He gave 
him the rudiments of the Greek and Latin and Hebrew lan- 
guages. But his father died when he was but thirteen years of 
age, leaving him and his widowed mother and two younger sis- 
ters, to the care of a kind Providence. 

He was the great grandson of John Brown of Haddington, 
whose able writings are circulated in all parts of the Christian 
world. 

This fatherless boy came to this country, to seek a fortune for 
himself and the dependent ones of the family. After spending 
a short time in the city of New York, he came to Hingham, and 
lived here for a few years. During this time he made a public 
profession of religion, and united with the Baptist Church in 
this place. 

He was distinguished for his Christian principles and consist- 
ent life. He was active and useful as a soldier of Christ at all 
times. One of his regiment says of him, " He was never known 
to do any thing he thought to be wrong, and he was the means 
of doing much good in the army ; and some were induced to be- 
come Christians through his faithful labors." 

In his regiment he was called " the little gospel^' he was so 
upright and so free from the vices of camp-life. But few gained 
such a victory as did this young man in our late war. The 
manner of his life and labors and death has been a great comfort 
to his deeply afflicted mother and sisters. He has a noble record, 
and died in a good cause. " He fongJit a good fight',' and has 
received his crown. His remains now repose in our beautiful 
cemetery, and his memory is fondly cherished by many who 
knew him and loved him when in life." 



IN MEMORIAM. 



DAVID W. GUSHING. 



339 



The remains of this soldier repose in the cemetery at Fort Hill ; 
and although not on the quota of Hingham, his former resi- 
dence at the West End of the town, where he was employed 
as stitcher, renders a notice of him here not inappropriate. 

He enlisted at Weymouth, and was mustered, Aug. 19, 1862, 
as private in Go. H of the Thirty-fifth Regiment, M. V. I. Pro- 
ceeding immediately to the seat of war, he was killed by a shell 
in the battle of Antietam on the 17th of September following. 

Private Gushing was born in Weymouth, Dec. 8, 1831. His 
parents were Mager, and Susan (Gook) Gushing. 

He left a widow and two children. 



JAGOB GILKEY GUSHING. 

Member of Go. I, Lincoln Light Infantry, Fourth Regiment, 
M. V. I., three months ; corporal in Go. D, Thirty-second 
Regiment, M. V. I., three years ; wounded at Laurel Hill, 
May 12, and died, May 14, 1864. 

Gorp. Jacob Gilkey Gushing was the only son of John and 
Harriet Jacob (Gilkey) Gushing, and was born in Hingham, Oct. 
8, 1836. At the outbreak of the war, he was a regular member 
of the Lincoln Light Infantry, and with this body was among 
the first to take the field for the defence of the Union. After 
returning from the three months' service at Fortress Monroe, he 
enlisted, Dec. 27 of the same year at Fort Warren. 

In the Army of the Potomac, with the Thirty-second, he was 
present in the engagements at Antietam, Fredericksburg, Ghan- 
cellorsville, Gettysburg, Rappahannock Station, and lastly in 
the bloody struggle at Laurel Hill. Here, on the 12th of May, 
the regiment was ordered to make a bayonet charge on the 
enemy. The advance was in a single line, exposed to a destruc- 
tive fire of musketry and artillery. Gorp. Gushing was color- 



340 



HINGHAM IN THE CIVIL WAR. 



guard, always a position of peculiar peril, and one demanding a 
large degree of true courage and heroism. Such a soldier could 
not be insensible to the fact, that he — 

" Who bears the standard on the battle's tide, 
Oft bears it in his shroud." 

In the carnage that attended the disaster of the day, he fell 
mortally wounded, and was taken to the camp hospital, where 
he survived until May 14, when he died at twenty-eight years 
of age. 

His loss was great to parents and friends at home, as well as 
to comrades in the field. As a citizen, he bore a character of 
the strictest integrity; as a son, he was dutiful and exemplary; 
while as a soldier, he was equally faithful, brave, and patriotic. 

The father, with that genuine, consistent, heartfelt devotion 
to the cause of liberty and universal freedom, a cause which 
through life had never ceased to be his earnest hope and labor, 
"kept not back" in the trying hour, but gave for the sacrifice 
what most he loved and prized. 

An only son, a soldier, for his country he fell. 

" Patriot, — lay thy weapon down, 
Quit the sword, and take thy crown." 



WILLIAM BRADFORD GUSHING. 

Private in Go. D of the Twenty-second Regiment, M. V, I., 
three years; died Aug. 8, 1862. 

William Bradford Gushing, the youngest son of Laban and 
Alice (Ferguson) Gushing, was born in Hingham, Aug. 16, 
1836. On the 6th of September, 1861, he enlisted at Boston, 
and after spending a few weeks in camp at Lynnfield, Mass., left 
for the seat of war, arriving at Washington on the 1 1 th of 
October. 

The winter was spent at Hall's Hill, Va., and preparations 



IN MEMORIAM. 



341 



for hostilities were commenced early in the following spring. 
The year proved an eventful one. At Alexandria he was 
engaged in provost-duty, and thence embarked for Fortress 
Monroe; took part in the reconnoissance towards Big Bethel, 
and was also in the engagement in front of Yorktown, when 
being detailed for picket-duty, he was among the first of the 
troops to enter the works and town just deserted by the enemy, 
and to plant therein the Stars and Stripes of the United States. 
He next left for West Point, Va., and from thence, via White 
House Landing, Gaines' Mill, and Hanover Court. House, took 
up his weary march towards Richmond. \ 

After the skirmish at Hanover Court House, he was detailed 
as teamster, and was employed in this capacity up to the month 
July. While in camp at Harrison's Landing, he was sick and 
disabled ; and, after a sickness of one week, died of typhoid 
fever at this place, on the 8th of August as before stated, aged 
twenty-six years. 

Scarcely a year in service, and just entering on the full 
strength and vigor of manhood, he was thus early removed by 
death, — death from disease, but death for the defence of his 
country. He left a widow and son. 



ANDREW JACKSON DAMON. 

Andrew Jackson Damon enlisted in Hingham, under recruiting 
officer, Edward Cazneau, Aug. 8, 1862. He was from Scitu- 
ate (son of John C. and Polly (Mayo) Damon), and was born in 
that town, June 14, 1843. 

A mason by trade, he left a good employment to join the 
Union army. Young Damon came forward at a time when 
enlistments were slow, and when the prospect of obtaining a 
sufficient number of men to avoid a draft in this town was far 
from promising. Accepted as a recruit by the proper officials, 
he was mustered into the U. S. service, Sept. 2, as private 
in Co. G of the Thirty-ninth Regiment, M. V. I., and accredited 



342 



HINGHAM IN THE CIVIL WAR. 



to the quota of Hingham. The regiment arrived at Washing- 
ton, D.C., Sept. 8, and was immediately ordered to an important 
duty near the Potomac River. 

But the change of climate and the exposures of camp-life 
soon brought disease to many of our soldiers, young Damon 
being among the number. Without witnessing the clash of 
'arms, or having suffered to any extent from long marches or 
military discipline, he became a victim to diarrhoea soon after 
leaving Washington; and the loth of October, 1862, about five 
weeks after leaving Boston, he entered the hospital at Seneca 
Mills. Thence he was removed to Muddy Creek Hospital, Oct. 
17, 1862 ; next to Patent Office Hospital, Washington, D.C., 
Nov. 5 ; and then to Continental Hospital, Maryland, Nov. 24, 
1862. Subsequently, he was at convalescent camp ; afterwards 
at Kalorama Hospital, and thence sent back to convalescent 
camp, April 5, 1863. 

July 31, 1863, he was discharged from the U. S. service at 
Boston for disability, and the record says, died at Scituate, of 
consumption. Thus was a young life given for the preservation 
of the Union as really .as though it had been sacrificed after 
many years of hard service. 

In the cemetery at North Scituate, a small marble stone 
bears the following inscription : — 

' ANDREW J. DAMON, 

39TH REGT., MASS. VOLS., 

. DIED 

Oct. 27, 1S63. 

^T 20 YRS. 



A SOLDIER'S GRAVE. 



JN MEMORIAM. 343 



WILLIAM DUNBAR, Jun. 

William Dunbar, jun., son of William and Sarah W. (Groce) 
Dunbar, was born in Hingham Nov. 2, 1828. 

Being employed as a farmer in Scituate, he enlisted upon the 
quota of that town, for three years, as private in Co. K, Seventh 
Regiment, M. V. I., June 15, 1861 ; discharged on account of 
disability, March 17, 1862; re-enlisted in Co. A, Thirty-fifth 
Regiment, M. V. I., and mustered Aug. 9, 1862. 

Mr. Dunbar shared the duties of the regiment while serving 
with the Nintli Army Corps in East Tennessee, through the 
severe weather and dearth of food that followed the siege of 
Knoxville. The history of the regiment during his connection 
with it is an eventful one, and doubtless his personal experience 
was extensive and interesting ; but it is almost entirely involved 
in obscurity, no friend or relative being able to communicate 
the facts of his toil, hardships, and dangers. 

He died of wounds received at the battle of Weldon Railroad, 
Aug. 19, 1864, aged thirty-five years, nine months. 



HELEN AURELIA DYER. 

It would be ingratitude were the name and services of this 
self-sacrificing and truly patriotic young lady omitted in our 
record of the heroic dead. She was the eldest daughter of Rev. 
E. Porter Dyer, formerly pastor of the Congregational Church 
at Hingham, and was born at Stowe, Mass., March 17, 1844. 

Her father having removed to this town in 1847, she was for 
several years a pupil in one of the schools at South Hingham, 
but finished her education in the high school at Medford, of 
which her uncle was principal. On returning home, she taught 
a private school at South Hingham, where she will be remem- 
bered by all who knew her for her happy disposition, her gentle 
demeanor, and the sweet Christian spirit she manifested in all 
her intercourse. 



344 HINGHAM IN THE CIVIL WAR. 

In 1 852 her oldest brother, who had been sent to South Caro- 
lina by the Freedmen's Aid Society, and was employed by the 
government as superintendent of abandoned plantations and 
contrabands on Port Royal Island, had gathered a school on the 
plantations ; but finding his active duties so burdensome that he 
could not give proper attention to his pupils, he suggested to his 
sister to come and take charge of the school. 

The Freedmen's Aid Society was calling for help of this kind ; 
and though the remuneration offered was scarcely more than 
enough to furnish the necessaries of life, yet Miss Dyer gladly 
accepted the suggestion ; and, before her brother was aware of 
her decision, he was informed of her arrival in Beaufort. She 
immediately took up her residence on the plantation with her 
brother, where, outside the picket-lines that guarded the town 
of Beaufort, and amid many discomforts and even dangers, and 
with very little society, save that of her poor colored proteges, 
she taught her little school for several months. 

After the removal of her brother to the army post-office at 
Hilton Head, she received an invitation to teach in a larger 
school of colored children in the town of Beaufort. Her suc- 
cess in this work was only equalled by the delight she felt in its 
prosecution. 

While on the plantation she became acquainted with Mr. B. 
N. Lee, paymaster in Gen. Saxton's civil department, and after- 
wards postmaster of Port Royal. This acquaintance ripened 
into an engagement; and in the autumn of 1864 Miss Dyer 
returned north to make preparations for marriage. She was 
marrred to Mr. Lee early in December, 1864, and Jan. 6, 1865, 
sailed from New York on her return to the South, by the 
steamer " Melville." This was just after Sherman's march 
through Georgia, and the government had assumed control of 
the steamers plying between New York and Port Royal. "The 
Melville " was an old, and, as it proved, an utterly unseaworthy 
vessel; but it was the only means of conveyance at the time, 
and delay seemed to offer nothing better. On the 7th of Janu- 
ary, The " Melville " was struck by a heavy sea in a snow-squall, 
her quarter-bow was stove in, and at eleven o'clock of the next 
morning she went down, bride and husband, with a large nam- 



IN MEMORTAM. 345 

ber of passengers, who soon perished in the wintry waters. But 
one passenger and two or three of the crew were saved alive to 
tell the story. 

Thus perished one of Hingham's fairest volunteers, who, 
though she bore no arms of conflict, yet " endured hardness as 
a good soldier " for the benefit of poor, down-trodden humanity. 



RICHARD JAMES FARRELL. 

Died in Hingham, of wounds and chronic diarrhoea, March 24. 
1864, aged twenty-three years, two months, fourteen days. 

Richard James Farrell was born in Dungarvan, County of 
Waterforcf, Province of Munster, Ireland, Jan. 10, 1841. His 
parents were Richard and Mary (Landers) Farrell. 

After he came to Hingham with his parents, he attended the 
public schools of the town, and at a later period was in the em- 
ploy of the Hingham Cordage Company. When the war broke 
out, he went to Boston with his associate, Michael Thompson, 
for the purpose of joining the regular army ; and on the loth of 
June, 1 86 1, enlisted as private, and was mustered for five years, 
under J. Hartwell Butler, first lieutenant commanding Co. G. 
Second Regiment U. S. Artillery. 

Concerning the personal experience of this soldier during the 
war, but little is known, except that he took part in the seven- 
days' fight, and was in McClellan's retreat on the Peninsula. 
Being^wounded in the head, and afflicted with chronic diarrhoea, 
he was confined for some time in the hospital near White Oak 
Church, and from that place was discharged by reason of 
surgeon's certificate of disability, dated Dec. 8, 1862. 

After returning to Hingham, he was sick and delirious till his 
decease. He was a man of fine disposition, and the officer com- 
manding the company speaks of him, in his discharge papers, 
as bearing an excellent character. 
44 



346 ff INGHAM IN THE CIVIL WAR. 



PEREZ FRANCIS FEARING. 

Private in Co. I of the Thirty-fifth Regiment, M. V. I., three 
years ; died of wounds in Poplar Lawn Hospital, Aug. 15, 1864. 

Perez Francis Fearing, son of Perez Lincoln and Margaret 
(Corthell) Fearing, was born in Hingham, Aug. 19, 1842. In 
August, 1862, he enhsted at Dover, Mass., and on the i6th was 
mustered into service. On the 14th of September he was en- 
gaged at South Mountain ; Antietarm followed. At the decisive 
moment of this great battle, he was called to aid in a charge 
upon the enemy, which, notwithstanding exposure to a most 
destructive cross-fire, was bravely carried through. In these two 
battles the loss of the regiment, in killed and wounded, was 
two hundred and sixty-seven. 

Next came the battle of Fredericksburg, in which the position 
of the regiment was much exposed, and where the loss sustained 
was again heavy. In two months from the date of his first 
engagement, the number of killed and wounded in the Thirty- 
fifth was three hundred and twenty-seven. 

In 1863 he shared in the privations and extended marches of 
the Mississippi Campaign. Kentucky, Tennessee, Ohio, Indi- 
ana, Illinois, Arkansas, Louisiana, and Mississippi were sever- 
ally traversed during the year. 

The taking of Jackson, the capital of Mississippi, was pre- 
ceded by numerous and rapid marches. The weather was 
intensely warm, and many of the men were sun-struck, or disa- 
bled by heat. 

From the time of the capture of the city of Jackson to the 
close of the year 1863, ever changing from one point to another 
throughout the South and West, his experience was one of pecu- 
liar trial and danger. He passed through Cumberland Gap, 
participated in the engagement at London Bridge, was besieged 
at Knoxville by Longstreet, relieved by Sherman, and afterwards, 
in the winter of 1863-4, ^t Blain's Cross Roads, East Tenn., suf- 
fered greatly from lack of food and clothing. 

In March, 1864, he left Tennessee to rejoin the Army of the 
Potomac, and took part in the advance through the Wilderness 



IN MEMORIAM. 



347 



under Gen. Grant. He was in the battles at Spottsylvania, North 
Anna, Cold Harbor, and other localities on the rout to James 
River, crossed the stream on pontoons June 15, and moved on 
Petersburg. Up to the 29th of July, he was employed at the 
front in the construction of earthworks and batteries, often ex- 
posed to the fire of the besieged by day, and burying the dead 
at night. On the 30th, in an advance at the Mine explosion, 
he was mortally wounded, and taken prisoner by the enemy, who 
conveyed him to Poplar Lawn Hospital, where he lingered till 
Aug. 15, 1864, when he was released by death, having been in 
the service two years. 

The record of this young soldier has few parallels in our local 
history. In wearisome marches, suffering from intense heat in 
summer, destitute of food and clothing, and exposed to the cold 
of winter, continually in contact with the enemy, mortally 
wounded almost at the moment of the final triumph of the great 
cause he had endured so much to sustain, taken prisoner, help- 
less, and dying, and at last giving up his life surrounded by his 
foes, the hand of war had scarcely more to add : his cup was full. 



MICHAEL FEE. 



Private in Co. F, Sixteenth Regiment, M. V, I., three years ; died 
Sept. 26, 1863, at Stanton Hospital, of disease contracted in 
the service. 

Michael Fee was born in Ballinamore, Leitrim County, Ireland, 
December, 1820. His parents were Patrick and Rose (Dolan) 
Fee. Resided on Cedar Street, Hingham, at the time of entering 
service. Enlisted at Boston, Dec. i, 1861, and was mustered the 
January following. Joining the regiment at Fortress Monroe, 
he remained there until May, 1862, when the march was made 
into Norfolk and Portsmouth, " the Sixteenth being one of the 
first Union regiments which entered these cities. 

On the 13th of June, he joined the Army of the Potomac, and 
on the i8th_the regiment sustained its first loss in a skirmish at 



348 



HINGHAM IN THE CIVIL WAR. 



Fair Oaks. Peach Orchard, Malvern Hill, Second Bull Run, 
Fredericksburg, Chancellorsville, and other battles, followed, not 
omitting Gettysburg, where the loss of the regiment, in killed 
and wounded, was nearly one-third of the whole number en- 
gaged. 

In the last battle he was wounded, and taken a prisoner to 
Richmond. After being exchanged, he was removed to Stan- 
ton Hospital at Washington, D.C., where he died of chronic 
diarrhoea, Sept. 26, 1863, aged forty-three years. He left a 
widow and six children. 



JAMES FITZGERALD. 

James Fitzgerald, or James Fitz as the name appears in a por- 
tion of the State papers, was born in Nova Scotia, in 1841. 
The father dying while the son was quite young, mother and 
child removed to Boston ; and in 1854, when about thirteen 
years of age, the youth came to this town, where at South 
Hingham he served an apprenticeship with Mr. John Gushing, 
remaining with this gentleman until 1859. 

June 10, 1 86 1, close upon the opening of the war, he enlisted 
as private in Co. G of the Twelfth Regiment, M. V. I., three 
years ; and on the 26th was mustered at Long Island, Boston 
Harbor. During the following year, he took part in some of the 
most noted battles which were fought during the rebellion. He 
was first engaged at Cedar Mountain, next at Second Bull Run, 
and lastly at Antietam, in the famous " Cornfield Battle," fought 
at that place on the 17th of September. The conflict was con- 
tinued throughout the day ; the scale of victory turning doubt- 
fully, first to the one side, and again to the other, until Lee, 
pressed by the persistent courage and bravery of the loyal 
troops, was obliged to commence a retreat, and re-cross the 
Potomac. 



IN MEMORIAM. 



349 



In the prolonged struggle, both armies had suffered extremely. 
Among the seriously injured was the subject of this sketch, 
young Fitzgerald. A musket-ball had entered his leg ; and thus 
disabled, he was removed to the hospital at Smoketown, where in 
the hope of arresting disease, and preserving life, he suffered 
amputation of the limb. No favorable results followed ; and 
gradually sinking, he died at this place, Nov. 6, 1862, aged 
nearly twenty-one years. 

The record left by this young soldier is a noble one. He was 
faithful, unflinchingly brave in seasons of greatest peril, was a 
general favorite, performed his duty to the end, and patriotically 
laid his life on the altar of his country. 



CHARLES EDWIN FRENCH. • 

Charles Edwin French, the youngest son of Nathaniel and 
Lydia (Burrill) French, was born in Hingham, Aug. 2, 1842. 

He enlisted for the quota of Hingham, and was mustered into 
service as private in Co. G, of the Thirty-ninth Regiment, 
M. V. I., Sept. 2, 1862. At the battle on the Weldon Railroad, 
he was taken prisoner with others of the regiment, and conveyed 
to Salisbury, N.C. ; where, from the best information that can be 
obtained, he died Nov. 28, 1864, from privation and exposure, 
aged twenty-two years. 

Young French was the third of the patriotic sons of this 
family who died in the service of their country. 



HENRY CHUBBUCK FRENCH. 

Sergeant in Co. G, Thirty-ninth Regiment, M. V. I., ; killed 
while a prisoner at Belle Isle, Va., Aug. 26, 1864, aged twenty- 
eight years, one month, twenty-six days. 



350 



HINGHAM IN THE CIVIL WAR. 

" Yet another crime, 
Another woe, must stain the Southern clime." 



Henry Chubbuck French, the second son of Nathaniel and 
Lydia (Burrill) French, was born in Hingham, June 30, 1836. 
He was brother of the late Lieut. Nathaniel French of the. 
Thirty-second Regiment, and also of the late Charles E. French 
of the Thirty-ninth Regiment, both of whom gave up their lives 
while in the service of their country. 

Serg. French was a sailmaker by trade. Early in May, 1861, 
he joined the volunteers who went from Hingham to fill the 
ranks of the Lincoln Light Infantry, Co. I, Fourth Regiment, 
then at Fortress Monroe, Va. Returning with the company, 
July 24, 1 86 1, he remained at home until August, 1862, when he 
again enlisted, and was mustered, Sept. 2, as sergeant in Co. G 
of the Thirty-ninth Regiment, M. V. L, three years. 

He participated in all the engagements of the regiment, 
up to the time of his capture, viz. : Mine Run, Laurel Hill, 
North Anna, Bethesda Church, White Oak Swamp, Petersburg, 
and Weldon Railroad. With several comrades, including his 
brother Charles, he was taken prisoner in the last named battle, 
on the Weldon Railroad, Aug. 19, 1864, and carried to Libby 
Prison, where he was subjected to the wicked usage which char- 
acterized this notorious place of confinement. At the time of 
his capture, he was so enfeebled by disease, as to be scarcely 
able to walk, and in this condition was transferred with others 
across the River to Belle Isle. 

He had been at this place but two or three days, when, totter- 
ing to his miserable quarters, the order was given him to move 
quicker. His weakness and bodily sufferings rendered it impos- 
sible to comply with this command. A boy sentry, represented 
as one of the most desperate fellows on guard, then raised his 
gun, and deliberately shot him through the heart. The position 
of the sentry was such that the prisoner's back was towards him, 
and he had, of course, no intimation of the horrid fate that 
awaited him. Thus foul murder finished what disease had 
begun ; and the life of this brave young soldier was laid on the 
altar of his country under circumstances of the most cruel 
barbarity. 



IN MEMORIAM. 



351 



War in its best aspect is horrible enough. The falling of a 
soldier on the field of battle, amid whistling bullets and shriek- 
ing shells, is a scene sufficiently dreadful to contemplate; but the 
savage butchery of the unarmed and feeble, possessing neither 
means nor strength for resistance, with the avenues for retreat 
closed on every hand, furnishes an instance of human depravity 
which must be condemned throughout the civilized world. 

By permission, the body of Serg. French was buried in another 
part of the island, under the supervision of his comrade and 
friend, Sergt. William Henry Jacob. 

He left a widow and three children. 



NATHANIEL FRENCH, Jun. 

Nathaniel French, jun., the oldest son of Nathaniel and 
Lydia (Burrill) French, was born in Hingham, April 7, 1828. 
He was a painter and glazier by trade. 

When the Lincoln Light Infantry was organized, Oct. 9, 1854, 
he joined the company as private; and May 18, 1857, was pro- 
moted corporal; Aug, 21, i860, sergeant; and April 19, 1861, 
was commissioned second lieutenant. 

On the breaking out of the war in 1 861, he took an active 
part in obtaining volunteers to fill the ranks of the company ; 
and partly through his energy and popularity, it was enabled to 
respond so promptly, and in point of number so creditably, to 
the call issued by the governor of the Commonwealth. 

At Fortress Monroe, Lieut. French shared in the general 
experience of the company. 

Shortly after, returning to Hingham, he opened a recruiting- 
office in Oasis Hall, for the purpose of obtaining recruits for a 
company in Boston. 

Nov. 16, 1 861, he was commissioned second lieutenant of 
Co. A, First Battalion, M. V., then stationed at Fort Warren ; 
and March 7, 1862, was promoted to first lieutenant. Subse- 
quently, May 25, 1862, the battalion was ordered to Washington, 



352 



HINGHAM IN THE CIVIL WAR. 



D.C., and was afterwards known as the Thirty-second Regiment. 
With the change of organization, he was assigned to Co. D ; 
and at Capitol Hill, Alexandria, Fairfax Seminary, &c., he per- 
formed all the duties of his position with efficiency and zeal. 

To a pleasing address, and thoughtful care of those under his 
charge, he added abilities, which, had he lived, would undoubtedly 
have insured him further promotion. 

While in camp near James River, Harrison's Landing the last 
of July, he was attacked with intermittent fever, and removed to 
the General Hospital early in August. 

From a letter written by the captain of Co. D to a near rela- 
tive, we make the following extract. 

Harrison's Landing Va., Aug. 9, 1S62. 
Dear Madam, — Lieut. French is no more. He died this morning 
about ten minutes before one o'clock at the General Hospital. He received 
all possible medical attendance, and the best of nursing. His last few days 
were clouded in delirium ; and he did not seem to realize his situation or rec- 
ognize those who faithfully watched over him. He died like one going to 
sleep, without a struggle. His body will be embalmed, and sent to Boston 
by express, directed to the care of Gov. Andrew. I need not say to you, 
that the loss falls heavily upon me and my command, as he was beloved as 
a brother by the officers of the company. The regiment has lost one of its 
most efficient men. His life was given to his country, and his name will ever 
be revered as one of the many who have fallen in this mighty struggle. In 
behalf of his comrades, I tender you and his surviving relatives and friends 
our sincere sympathy, ever mourning the loss and cherishing the memory of 
a brave officer and kind friend. 

[Signed] James P. Draper, 

Captain Co. D, TJiiTty-second Regiment, M. V. I. 

The remains of Lieut. French were brought to Hingham for 
interment ; and appropriate services were held on Sunday after- 
noon, Aug. 17, 1862, first at the former residence of the deceased, 
and at a later hour in the meeting-house of the First Parish, 
Rev. Dr. Stebbins of Woburn, and Rev. Robert Collyer of 
Chicago, officiating. A large concourse of people was present 
to show their respect for the patriotism of the deceased, and to 
sympathize with the family in their bereavement. 

A marble stone in the Hingham Cemetery bears the inscrip- 
tion, — 



JN MEMORIAM. 253 



IN MEMORIAM. 

LIEUT. NATHANIEL FRENCH, Jr. 
CO. D. 32D REG., MASS. VOLS. 

DIED AT 

Harrison's Landing, Va. 
Aug. 9, 1862. 

AGED 34 YEARS 4 MONTHS. 

HIS COUNTRY CALLED, HE OBEYED. 



GEORGE DOANE GARDNER. 

Aug; 9, 1862, enlisted at Hingham as private in Co. G of the 
Thirty-ninth Regiment, M. V. I., three years, and was mus- 
tered Sept. 2, 1862 ; died Aug. 4, 1864. 

George Doane Gardner was the son of Enoch Whiton, and 
Orra (Amadon) Gardner, and was born in Boston, Mass., Aug. 
27, 1828. 

Mr. Gardner entered the .service in August of 1862, a time 
when the real magnitude of the conflict began to be realized ; 
and during the two following years shared in the privations and 
exposures, as well as in the numerous engagements, allotted to 
this portion of the army. At Brock Pike, Mine Run, Laurel 
Hill, Spottsylvania, North Anna, Bethesda Church, and in all 
the prominent battles before Petersburg up to the 20th of July, 
he was present, and took part. A few days after this date, being 
taken severely ill, he was conveyed to the Fifth Corps Hospital, 
at City Point, Va., where he died of inflammation of the bow- 
els, aged thirty-six years. 

He is commended by his companions in arms as one who never 
evaded a duty, and as being a true soldier. 
45 



354 



HINGHAM IN THE CIVIL WAR. 



JOHN WILLIAM GARDNER. 



First, private in Co. I, First Regiment, M. V. I., three years ; 
second, in the Navy on board gunboat " Hartford ; " third, 
private in Co. I of the Twelfth Regiment, Maine Vol. Inf., 
three years ; died at New Orleans, June 24, 1863. 

John William, more familiarly known as William, Gardner, 
was the youngest son of Hosea and Sophia (Cole) Gardner, and 
was born in Hingham, Aug. 17, 1820. 

He entered the service May 24, 1 861, and was among the first 
of the three-years' men who left the State, as he was also 
among the first in the service of the United States. Leaving 
camp on the 15 th of June, he reached Baltimore on the 17th, 
and marched through the city ; Col. Cowdin's regiment being 
the first that had passed through the place since the attack on 
the Sixth Regiment on the memorable 19th of April. At 
Washington they were reviewed by the president, 
** On the morning of the 17th of July, orders were received to 
make an advance for the purpose of attacking the enemy. The 
battle of Bull Run followed in the afternoon. Detailed as 
" pioneer " on the occasion, the duties of this exposed and truly 
perilous position were well performed. Referring to the disas- 
ters of the day, it was remarked that "the Massachusetts 
First, from the beginning to the end, bore itself gallantly ; and, 
if all had done equally well, a different result would have 
happened." 

On the 19th and 20th he was engaged with the enemy; and 
on the 2 2d was one of the rear-guard that covered the army in 
its retreat to Washington. A service so active soon induced 
disease, and finally disability, for which he was discharged, 
Sept. 2, 1 86 1. 

Dec. 14, 1 86 1, with the partial return of health, he shipped in 
the U. S. Navy, at Boston, as seaman, and was assigned to 
the U. S. steamer " Hartford," twenty-two guns, and on board 
this vessel sailed to join the Gulf squadron. 

On the 3d of February, 1862, the "Hartford" left Hampton 
Roads for the mouth of the Mississippi River, under command 
of Flag-ofBcer Farragut, and Feb. 20 arrived at Ship Island. 



IN MEMORIAM. 355 

From the i6th to the 25th of April, he shared m the bom- 
bardment and passage of Forts Jackson and St. Philip, and 
the capture of New Orleans, during which the " Hartford," 
while accidentally aground, was set on fire by a fire-raft, and 
was struck thirty-two times by shot from the guns of the 
enemy. 

June 28, 1862, took part in the passage of the Vicksburg bat- 
teries, going up the river; and on the 15th of July was present 
in a like engagement at the same point on the passage down, 
attacking also the rebel ram " Arkansas." 

In the autumn of 1862, being enfeebled and almost disabled 
by severe rheumatism, he left the " Hartford " while at New 
Orleans, and for the second time entered the land service, 
enlisting in the Twelfth Maine Volunteer Infantry, as before 
stated. 

In January, 1863, this regiment was stationed at Plaquemine, 
a small town on the west bank of the Mississippi, about a hun- 
dred miles above New Orleans. The New Hampshire Eighth, 
happening to halt at this place, Col. Hawkes Fearing states 
that he was agreeably surprised to meet and take by the hand 
the subject of this sketch. Neither age nor the vicissitudes of 
war had done much to change the man ; and his form and man- 
ner awakened recollections of youthful days, and pleasant scenes 
at home in younger years. It was probably his last interview 
with one of his fellow-townsmen. Disabled by disease, he was 
removed to the St. James Hospital at New Orleans, where his 
death took place from chronic diarrhoea, June 24, 1863, aged 
forty-two years. 

He was unmarried. Much of his early life was spent as sea- 
man. During the war with Mexico, though not in the regular 
service of the United States, which he never entered except as 
a volunteer soldier in the civil war, he was employed in the 
quartermaster's department ; and in the transportation of provis- 
ions and general supplies rendered important assistance, proving 
capable, faithful, and efficient. 

While connected with the First Regiment, he " performed his 
duty well, fought well," and had the commendation of the offi- 
cers generally, as being a good and brave soldier. His life. 



356 H INGHAM IN THE CIVIL WAR. 

varied and eventful, was closed in the service of his country. 
Who thus dies, dies not in vain. 



CALEB BEMIS GILL. 

Died of consumption at Norris, Fulton County, III, April 24, 
1867, aged twenty-seven years and ten months. 

Caleb Bemis Gill, whose name is upon the Soldiers' and Sailors' 
Monument, son of Dixon Lewis and Eliza (Fuller) Gill, was 
born June 29, 1839, while his parents were temporarily residing 
at Fitchburg, Mass. They afterwards removed to Hingham, and 
he was a pupil in our public schools. At a later period he was 
employed as clerk at Cincinnati, Ohio. 

The family removed to Hagerstown, Ind., early in the year 
1859 ! '^'^^ Caleb enlisted at Richmond, in that State, Oct. 8, 1861, 
and was mustered Oct. 10, as sergeant in Co. I, Fifty-seventh 
Regiment, Indiana Foot Volunteers ; promoted second lieutenant 
at Murfreesborough, Tenn., April 3, 1863. 

Lieut. Gill was assistant quartermaster about two years, and 
served on Gen. Wood's staff about one year. 

He was in the battles of Fort Donelson, Stone River, Mur- 
freesborough, Chickamauga, Lookout Mountain, and at the siege 
of Vicksburg. 

The disease that caused his death was the result of hardship 
and exposure while in the service of his country. 

He left a widow and one child. 



ELIJAH B. GILL, Jun. 

[From the Massachusetts Register of 1862.] 

Elijah B. Gill, jun., was born in Hingham, Mass., April 24, 
1833 ; but had resided in Boston for several years. When 



IN MEMORIAM. 357 

the proclamation for troops was issued, he promptly came for- 
ward, and enlisted in Co. I, First Regiment of Massachusetts 
Volunteers, and was chosen a lieutenant of the company. He 
entered upon his duties with a patriotic pride and satisfaction, 
cheerfully sharing in the dangers and privations of a soldier's 
life. 

A part of the regiment to which he belonged was engaged in 
the battle of Bull Run, in July, r86i ; and his company was 
detailed, with others, for especial duty, on the 21st instant ; and it 
was in the gallant discharge of this dangerous duty, that young 
Gill heroically fell, mortally wounded by a bullet through the 
breast. His comrades tenderly bore his body from the field, and 
buried it that night at Centreville, with feelings of keen sorrow 
for their loss, and regret that the body could not be conveyed to 
his native State. 

One of the officers of the regiment writes, " My recollections 
of him are of a pleasant nature. He was one of my favorites. 
In scenes of anxiety and danger, 1 learned his fine qualities, and 
contracted a strong friendship for him. 

" His deportment was gentlemanly, his habits good, and, as an 
officer and soldier, he was kind and efficient. His men loved 
him, his officers esteemed him, and his memory will ever be 
cherished by his friends." 

Lieut. Gill was the first native of Hingham whose life was 
sacrificed in the late civil war. 



NATHANIEL GILL. 

Nathaniel Gill, son of Leavitt and Susannah (Stowell) Gill, was 
born in Hingham, July 29, 1832. 

After completing his studies in the public schools of this 
town, he learned the trade of carriage-painter, and at the time 
of enlistment was employed at his occupation in Boston. 

Aug. 3, 1 86 1, he joined the military band of the Eleventh 



358 HINGHAM IN THE CIVIL WAR. 

Regiment, M. V. I., and was mustered into the United States 
service as private. 

During the battles of the Peninsula under Gen. McClellan, Mr. 
Gill served with his associates in carrying the wounded to the 
hospital from the different parts of the battle-field. 

He was mustered out Aug. 8, 1862, by reason of an order 
from the War Department, dispensing with regimental bands. 

In 1865, while residing in Boston, he became insane, and was 
sent to the Boston Hospital, and afterwards to the Taunton 
Lunatic Asylum, where he died Dec. 31, 1865, aged thirty-three 
years and five months. 



EDWARD WELLES HALCRO. 

Born in the city of Hamburg, Jan. 24, 1836. His parents were 
George Wright, and Annie (Wright) Halcro, both natives of 
Sunderland, Eng. 

The death of the mother was soon followed by the death of 
the father, leaving Halcro an orphan six years of age. Return- 
ing to Sunderland, he remained there till 1857, when he emi- 
grated to the United States, became a legal citizen, and resided 
in Boston. 

Entering the Navy May 5, 1862, he was appointed acting 
master's-mate, and ordered to the United States steamer "Gen- 
esee," eight guns, attached to the North Atlantic blockading 
squadron, taking part in the memorable passage of the Port 
Hudson batteries on the night of March 17, 1863. The officers 
and crew of this vessel were especially commended for the ser- 
vice rendered on that occasion. The " Genesee " not only saved 
a large portion of the crew of the United States steam-frigate 
" Mississippi (burned), but also rescued the United States sloop 
" Richmond " from a like fate, after her engines had become dis- 
abled. Mr. Halcro is particularly mentioned by his commanding 
office in the official despatches. 

Dec. 15, 1863, he was promoted acting ensign ; June 27, 1864, 



IN MEMORIAM. 



359 



sent to Pensacola Hospital, where a board of medical examiners 
ordered him North to the hospital at Chelsea, Mass, 

In September, having regained his health, he was sent on 
board the United States schooner " Ovetta," three guns, as 
executive officer attached to the South Atlantic blockading 
squadron. 

May 19, 1865, ordered to the United States schooner " Sarah 
Bruen," two guns, went to New York, and was there detached, and 
granted leave. Dec, 26, 1865, received an honorable discharge. 

Jan. II, 1866, he was re-appointed acting ensign in the 
United States Navy, and ordered to the United States steamer 
"Idaho," then building at New York, On the i6th of June, 
1866, he was ordered to the United States receiving-ship " New 
Hampshire," stationed at Norfolk, Va. 

Feb, 6, 1867, his appointment was revoked, and he was sent to 
Norfolk Hospital, where he died of consumption, April 5, 1867, 
His remains were subsequently deposited in the cemetery at 
Hingham Centre, For some years prior to his decease, he 
resided in this town, and was esteemed for his strict integrity 
and consistent Christian character. 

'' How deep the calm ! The haven reached. 
Nor storms, nor fear of shipwreck, now are thine." 



JAMES MADISON HASKELL. 

Volunteer in the Lincoln Light Infantry, afterwards in Co. A, 
Thirty-second Regiment, M. V. I., three years. 

Promoted first to corporal, second to sergeant. Wounded at 
Gettysburg, July 2, 1863, and died Aug. 26, 1863, aged twenty- 
six years. 

Serg. James Madison Haskell, son of William and Rachel 
(Turner) Haskell, was born at Augusta, Me., in 1837. He early 
removed to Hingham, and was a resident here at the breaking 
out of the rebellion. On the 17th of April, 1861, he left town 
as a three months' volunteer, in the Lincoln Light Infantry ; and 



36o ' HINGHAM IN THE CIVIL WAR. 

in October following enlisted for three years, and joined the 
Army of the Potomac, sharing in the numerous as well as 
severe engagements allotted to the Thirty-second Regiment. 
At Gaines' Mill. Malvern Hill, Second Bull Run, Chantilly, 
Antietam, Fredericksburg, and Chancellorsville, he fought with 
manly courage, and escaped unharmed ; but in the terrible strug- 
gle at Gettysburg, he was wounded in both legs, and conveyed 
in a helpless condition to the general hospital. Here, after most 
intense suffering, he found partial relief through amputation of 
one of the limbs, but it was soon apparent that he had passed 
beyond the reach of human skill. 

At one period of the war, six brothers of the deceased were 
enhsted in the service, actively engaged in the cause of freedom 
and the support of the Union- 

Capt. George R. Reed speaks in the highest terms of his 
excellent qualities as a soldier. At the hospital he bore his 
misfortune with gentle resignation, and as a true Christian. 

A dutiful son, kind brother and friend, he died universally 
■esteemed and lamented. 



ALBERT STANLEY HAYNES. 

First, a volunteer in the Lincoln Light Infantry ; second, 
private in Co. G of the Thirty-ninth Regiment, M. V. L, three 
years. Wounded at Laurel Hill, May 8, 1864, and died the nth 
of the June following, aged twenty-one years. 

Albert Stanley Haynes was born in Hanover, Ma.ss , Septem- 
ber, 1843. His parents were John and Persis (Whiting) H^aynes. 
At the beginning of the national struggle, and then but nineteen 
yeais of age, he enrolled his name as a member of the Lincoln 
Light Infantry, and was one of the thirty-seven men who left 
Hingham on the i8th of May, 1861, to fill the quota of this 
company, then stationed at Fortress Monroe. 



IN MEMORIAM. 36 1 

While connected with the Army of the Potomac, he was 
called to no general engagement prior to 1864, a year most 
eventful in the history of the Thirty-ninth. The winter and 
early spring had been spent at the front. On the 6th of May 
the great struggle was fairly begun ; and, for weeks after, one 
engagement followed another in rapid succession. They were 
the decisive battles of the rebellion. 

At Laurel Hill, during a charge on the enemy's lines, young 
Haynes was unfortunately wounded in the foot by a musket-ball, 
and, being disabled, was conveyed to the Judiciary Square Hos- 
pital, Washington, D.C. Having been granted a furlough of 
thirty days, he returned to Hingham. Here his situation be- 
came critical, and finally hopeless. Amputation of a portion of 
the limb was followed by no favorable results ; and he died from 
the effects of the wound, at the residence of Mr. Dexter Whit- 
ing, at South Hingham. 

An orphan, without brother or sister, almost alone in the 
world, young Haynes early enlisted for the defence and support 
of the Union. His record has no blemish, and the pages of our 
history will contain few instances of greater fidelity or nobler 
heroism. 



HIRAM WILLEY HENDERSON. 

Enlisted in the town of Gray, Me., and was connected with the 
Twenty-fifth, and also with the Thirtieth Maine Regiments, 
both under Col. Fessenden. He entered the service as pri- 
vate, and was promoted corporal. Died of disease contracted 
in the service. 

Corp. Hiram Willey Henderson, whose name is upon the 
Soldiers' and Sailors' Monument, was born in Boston, in March, 
1826. His parents were Timothy B.' and Nancy (Neale) Hen- 
derson, 

After joining the army, he was with Gen. Banks on the Red 
River Expedition, and participated in all the engagements of the 
Thirtieth Regiment during the three years it was in the field. 
46 



362 



HINGHAM IN THE CIVIL WAR. 



His experience was long and severe, covering as it did a period 
of forty-five months. Escaping death and wounds, he was mus- 
tered out at the end of his term of enlistment in August, 1865. 

Just before leaving the army, he was attacked by chronic 
diarrhoea ; and returning to his family in the town of Gray, Me., 
he there died, on the 24th of March, 1866, at forty years of 



age. 



The deceased was a brother of Mr. Samuel J. Henderson of 
this town, and for some years followed his trade at Hingham 
Centre, where he will be remembered by many early friends and 
associates. 



DANIEL DUNBAR HERSEY. 

Private in Co. F, Thirty-second Regiment, M. V. I., died of 
chronic diarrhoea, at Weymouth, Mass., Oct. 15, 1862, aged 
thirty-nine years, two months, fifteen days, 

Daniel Dunbar Hersey, son of Peter and Mary (Dunbar) 
Hersey, was born in Hingham, July 31, 1823. By trade he was 
a shoemaker, although he followed packeting between Hingham 
and Boston during some portion of his life. At the time of 
entering the service he resided at Weymouth, and was accred- 
ited on the quota of that town. He enlisted Feb. 14, and was 
mustered Feb. 19, 1862, at Fort Warren, as private in Co. F of 
the Thirty-second Regiment, M. V. I. 

But little is known of the military life of this soldier, except 
that he was discharged at Fortress Monroe, Sept. 30, 1862, for 
disability. He was very ill and weak at the time of leaving the 
fortress ; but a strong affection for his friends and home, and the 
desire to reach them before his death, kept up strength and 
spirit. On hands and knees, he started for the depot to take the 
departing train ; but, failing in the attempt, a negro kindly bore 
him on his shoulders to the place of destination. 

Mr. Hersey reached home a mere skeleton, too weak to relate 
any of his experience, and died in two or three days. 



IN MEMORIAM. 363 



HOLLIS HERSEY. 

Hollis Hersey, son of Nathaniel and Priscilla (Stodder) Hersey, 
was born in Hingham, May 3, 1833. 

On the 15 th of August, 1862, he enlisted at Read villa, Mass., 
and Sept. 16 was mustered as private in Co. K of the Forty- 
third Regiment, for nine months. In the department of North 
Carolina, where the regiment spent its term of service, Mr. Her- 
sey was present in the engagements at Whitehall, Kinston, and 
Goldsboro' ; but afterwards, being sick and disabled, he was con- 
veyed to the camp hospital, then near Newbern. Remaining 
here till the close of his term of enlistment, he returned with 
the regiment to Boston, and was mustered out July 30, 1863. 

In feeble health he came to Hingham, where he hoped a 
change of scene, and the invigorating air of his native town, 
might restore his wasted strength and health. No permanent 
improvement, however, followed ; and lingering till- the 30th of 
August, 1865, he died of hemorrhage of the stomach, aged thirty- 
one years. 



JOHN QUINCY HERSEY. 

John Quincy Hersey, born in Hingham, Sept. 23, 1829, was a 
son of William, 2d, and Elizabeth Burbank (Tower) Hersey. 

He was a laborer. 

Enlisting in this town under Lieut. Lyman B. Whiton, he was 
mustered Dec. 17, 1861 at Camp Cameron, Cambridge, as 
private in Co. E, First Battalion Infantry, M. V., afterwards 
Thirty-second Regiment. Dec. 23 following, he joined the regi- 
ment at Fort Warren, and shared its marches and dangers. 

Mr. Hersey was at Harrison's Landing, and in the battles of 
Second Bull Run and Antietam. But the heat of summer, an 
unhealthy climate, and the hardships of the soldier, were too 
much for his physical strength ; and he gave his life a sacrifice 
on the altar of. his country early in her days of need. 



3^4 



HINGHAM IN THE CIVIL WAR. 



He died of chronic diarrhoea, at Judiciary Square Hospital, 
Washington, D.C., Nov. 28, 1862, aged thirty-three years and 
two months. 



THOMAS HERVEY. 

Thomas Hervey was from Charlestown, Mass., and enlisted 
for the first quota of Hingham. He was mustered as private 
in Co. I of the Thirty-eighth Regiment, M. V. I., Aug. 21, 
1862, and was killed April 13, 1863, at Bisland, La. He was 
a currier by trade, and thirty-seven years of age. 



ALEXANDER HITCHBORN. 

Born in Hingham, 1822. 

His parents were Alexander and Cinderilla (Gardner) Hitch- 
born. At the commencement of the rebellion, he was a resi- 
dent of North Bridgewater (now Brockton), to which place he 
removed about the year 1854, and where he had established 
himself as a physician. 

June 26, 1861, he enlisted in Co. F of the Twelfth Regiment 
Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry, and the same day was com- 
missioned captain. Resigned, and received his discharge May 
13, 1862. 

Soon after enlisted, or was appointed, as assistant surgeon in 
the Seventh Infantry of the Regular Army. At the battle of 
Chancellorsville, he pitched his hospital-tent in the rear, not far 
from the " Brick House " mentioned in the records of that 
engagement. The army was just moving into the fight which 
resulted so disastrously to the Union forces, when he was stricken 
by a stray bullet, as is supposed, and fell instantly dead. He was 
buried on the spot. 

Dr. Hitchborn, while in North Bridgewater, stood well as a 



IN MEMORIAM. 365 

physician, and gave promise of attaining a high position in his 
profession. To this it is proper to add, that he was a genial 
companion, possessed a most tenacious memory, and was gifted 
with conversational powers rarely allotted to an individual. 
With the exception of an adopted daughter, he left no family. 



ELIJAH HOBART. 

[Communicated.] 

Elijah Hobart, son of Caleb and Mary (Lincoln) Hobart, grand- 
son of Caleb Hobart, a Revolutionary soldier, was born in 
Hingham, Oct. 4, 1821 ; died near Point of Rocks, Va., July 
4, 1864. 

Capt. Hobart received his early education in the public schools 
and Derby Academy of the town. At the age of fifteen he left 
home for Boston, to learn the art of engraving, and continued 
there five years after the expiration of his apprenticeship ; then 
went to Plymouth, Mass., to make a copy on steel of Sargent's 
" Landing of the Pilgrims." After more than two years of con- 
stant labor, he completed the work, and in February, 1850, 
received a copyright. The work became quite celebrated, and is 
well known in our vicinity. In 1850 he removed to Albany, N.Y., 
and devoted his time and talents to the engraving of bank-notes 
till war spread its dark cloud over the land. 

Soon after the outbreak of the rebellion, and when the coun- 
try still needed volunteers, Capt. Hobart, in writing to his friends, 
said, " Our country is worth defending : I shall prepare to enter 
the army." 

Being skilled in the use of the rifle, he at once set about 
recruiting a company of sharpshooters for Berdan's regiment, 
then forming. 

The company was organized and accepted Nov. 9, 1861 ; but, 
in consequence of not being able to supply the requisite arms, 
the destination of the company was changed by order of the gov- 



366 HINGHAM TN THE CIVIL WAR. 

ernment, and was assigned the position of Co. B, Ninety-third 
Regiment New York Volunteers ; and was included in Gen. 
Casey's division, to go tQ the Peninsula with Gen. McClellan. 

Capt. Hobart continued in command of his company, sharing 
its duties and perils, at Lee's Mills, White House, and Williams- 
burg ; was detailed for the destruction of government stores at 
the evacuation of White House, and to convey prisoners to 
Fortress Monroe and Fort Dela\yare. 

He received an honorable discharge from the service of the 
United States, dated June 12, 1862, and took an important 
position in the Treasury Department at Washington, where he 
had the general superintendence of the engravings for the frac- 
tional currency issued by the government. 

On the Fourth of July, 1864, with a party of friends, he 
started for a day's sail on the river, with the intention of going 
to Harper's Ferry ; but when near " Point of Rocks," Mosby's 
battery opened fire on them. They immediately changed their 
course, and ran into a creek near by, the party escaping to the 
woods. Capt. Hobart stood on the prow of the boat, watching 
the battery, and said to a friend near by, " They have our range : 
jump, and I will follow." Before they could do so, five men, 
who had left the battery and crept through the woods to their 
rear, fired upon their unconscious victim. He was instantly 
killed. 

Of Capt. Hobart's devotion to duty, one associated with him 
while in the army thus writes, " Through the Peninsular cam- 
paign, one of the severest of the war, he led his company with 
a courage and devotion that never faltered ; and when exposure 
and hardship were thinning our ranks faster than the bullets of 
the enemy, his own health giving way, he only spoke words of 
encouragement and cheer to his men ; and when he left the 
regiment, it lost one of its best and bravest officers." 

Another writes, " I was the first to enlist in his company, and 
never knew a truer, braver, or better man ; and our greatest loss, 
as a company, was when he left us." 

In his native town, in consecrated grounds, with kindred and 
friends, he sleeps. 

H. G. G. 



IN MEMORTAM. 



EDWIN HUMPHREY. 



367 



Captain of Co. A, Eleventh Regiment, M. V. I. ; killed at the 
battle of Gettysburg, Pa., July 2, 1863, aged thirty-one years, 
nine months, twenty-six days. * 

" Come from the heat of battle, and in peace. 
Soldier, go home ; with thee the fight is won." 

Edwin Plumphrey, second son of Leavitt and Meriel (Stod- 
der) Humphrey, was born in Hinghara Sept. 6, 183 1. He was 
educated in the public schools of the town, and afterwards 
learned the trade of carriage-maker in Boston. At the termi- 
nation of his apprenticeship, he commenced business on Chap- 
man Street ; but in 185S returned to Hingham, and opened a 
carriage manufactory on Summer Street, near Commercial 
Wharf. 

When the Massachusetts Sixth was attacked in Baltimore, 
Capt. Humphrey felt it his duty to join the forces then 
recruiting for the preservation of the Union ; and the next day, 
(April 20) went to Boston and enlisted. He had previously 
been connected with the military of the State, and was well 
qualified from experience to assist in organizing and instructing 
the new recruits. 

June 13, 1 86 1, he was commissioned first lieutenant of Co. G, 
Eleventh Regiment, M. V. I., then in camp at Fort Warren, 
Boston Harbor. 

Oct. II, 1861, Lieut. Humphrey was promoted captain, and 
assigned to Co. A. 

He shared in the general experience of the Eleventh in all its 
engagements, marches, and privations ; was present with his 
command, and took an active part, in the battles of First Bull 
Run, Yorktown, Williamsburg, Fair Oaks, Savage Station, 
Glendale, Malvern Hill, Bristoe's Station, Second Bull Run, Chan- 
tilly, Fredericksburg, Chancellors ville, and Gettysburg. In the 
first day's fight at Gettysburg (July 2, 1863), he fell mortally 
wounded. He had evidently been picked off for his bravery 
by the enemy's sharpshooters, as upon examination the body 



368 HINGHAM IN THE CIVIL WAR. 

was found shot in four places. He died the following night, at 
the field hospital, and was buried on the battle-field. His re- 
mains were subsequently brought to Hingham for interment. 

Capt. Humphrey was the first person from this town who 
enlisted upon our quota for three years. His former military 
experience, good judgment, and quiet, unassuming manner, made 
him a favorite in the regiment. He was not only respected as 
an officer, but loved as a friend and brother. The colonel of 
the regiment, in a communication written on the battle-field, 
said of the deceased, " We feel deeply our loss of a brave and 
meritorious officer. Kind and forbearing in disposition, gallant 
in action, he combined the qualifications of the commander and 
the gentleman." 

His funeral services were held Sunday afternoon, July 19, 
1863, first at the family residence, and afterwards at the Univer- 
salist Meeting-House. An appropriate sermon was preached by 
the pastor. Rev. John E. Davenport. Rev, Daniel Bowen of the 
Third Parish, and Rev. Jonathan Tilson of the Baptist Society, 
took part in the exercises. The occasion called together a large 
number of relatives and friends to pay the last tribute of respect 
to his memory. 

He left a widow and two children. 

A marble tablet, since erected in the Hingham Cemetery, 
bears the following inscription : — 

EDWIN HUMPHREY 

Capt. of Co. A, iith Reg. 

Mass. Vols. Born Sept. 6, 1S31. 

FELL AT THE BATTLE OF GETTYSBUBG, PA. 

July 2, 1863. 

A hero sleeps beneath this stone, 

A patriot firm and brave. 

Through thirteen battles he had passed 

His country's flag to save ; 

Four bullets pierced his mortal frame ; 

He fell, but left an honored name. 



IN MEMORIAM. 



WALLACE HUMPHREY 



369 



Private in Co. E, Thirty-second Regiment, M. V. L, killed at 
Cold Harbor, Va., June 3, 1864, aged twenty-seven years and 
nine months. 

Wallace Humphrey, son of Joshua and Mary (Hudson) 
Humphrey, was born in Hingham, Sept. 2, 1836.' He was by 
occupation shoemaker. 

Joining the Thirty-second Regiment at Fort Warren, Boston 
Harbor, be was mustered Dec. 2, 1861, as private in Co. E. He 
re-enlisted as veteran Jan. 4, 1864, and was mustered the day 
following. 

Soon after the second battle of Bull Run, private Humphrey 
being sick, was sent to the United States Hospital at David's 
Island, N.Y., where he remained about eight months. Rejoining 
his regiment in April, 1863, he was present at the battles of 
Chancellorsville, Getfysburg, Rappahannock Station, Mine Run, 
Wilderness, Laurel Hill, Spottsylvania, North Anna, Tolopotomy 
Swamp, Bethesda Church, and Cold Harbor. A portion of this 
time he was detailed for duty on the baggage-train. 

At Cold Harbor the regiment charged the enemy, and took the 
ifirst line of earth-works and rifle-pits. Sharp skirmishing fol- 
lowed at intervals through the day ; and while firing over the 
earth-works near Old Church, private Humphrey was struck in 
the head by a ball from the rear, and mortally wounded. He 
lived but two hours. His remains were buried at night, on Brok- 
enboll's Farm, near the church, and the grave designated by the 
name, company, and regiment of its occupant. 

Mr. Humphrey was a good soldier, remarkably brave, attentive 
to duty, and had the esteem of his comrades, and the confidence 
of his officers. 

He left a widow. 
47 



370 HINGHAM IN THE CIVIL WAR. 

GARDNER JONES. 

Private in Co. F, Thirty-second Regiment, M. V. I., died of 
wounds at Campbell Hospital, Washington, D.C., June i, 
1864, aged twenty-one years, four months, and twenty-one 
days. 

" Thou art where friend meets friend, 
Beneath the shadow of the ehn to rest; 
Thou art where foe meets foe, and trumpets rend 
The skies, and swords beat down the princely crest." 

Gardner Jones, second son of William Henry and Elizabeth 
(Glover) Jones, was born in Boston, Mass., Jan. 10, 1843. While 
an infant his parents removed to Hingham, and he afterwards 
was a pupil at the public schools of the town. 

Following the occupation of shoemaker at the time of entering 
the service, he enlisted under recruiting-ofQcer Edward Cazneau, 
Feb. 13, 1862 ; and Feb. 19 was mustered at Fort Warren as 
private in Co. F of the Thirty-second Regiment, M. V. I., for 
three years. 

To relate his experience is to repeat the history of the regi- 
ment ; for wherever ordered, or however great were its exposures, 
young Jones was ever at the post of duty. A youthful, joyous, 
enthusiastic soldier, full of hope in the future, and without a 
thought of danger, he went marching on. 

During the year 1862 he was with the regiment in the 
engagements at Antietam, Shepardstown Ford, and Fredericks- 
burg. 

In 1863 he took part in the following battles and engagements, 
viz. : Chancellorsville, Aldie Gap, Gettysburg, Rappahannock 
Station, and Mine Run ; and in 1864 he participated in the battle 
of the Wilderness. 

On the removal to Laurel Hill, May 10, 1864, while the regi- 
ment was endeavoring to establish a new picket-line, young 
Jones, with two others, volunteered to perform a perilous duty, 
and with one of his comrades was severely wounded. Prompt 
measures were taken to lighten his distress, and to make his 
situation as -comfortable as possible. But the nature of his 



IN MEMORIAM. 



371 



injury was such that the most skilful surgeons could afford but 
temporary relief; and his name was soon added to that long list 
of heroes who gave up theii; lives for the Union of the States. 

The following letter dated, June 8, 1864, was received by the 
mother of young Jones : — 

Dear Madam, — Circumstances have not permitted me to write you 
before this time in regard to your son, Gardner Jones, of my company, who 
was severely wounded in the thigh. May 10, in a charge of the regiment 
upon the enemy's rifle-pits. 

He was at first sent to the hospital at Fredericksburg, thence to Washing- 
ton. I did not suppose he was dangerously wounded. 

To-day I have received the sad intelligence that he died of his wounds 
June I, in Campbell Hospital, Washington, D.C. 

He behaved most bravely in all the battles up to the time he was stricken 
down, and I had determined to promote him for his good conduct. 

I deplore his sad fate, and sympathize with you in your great loss. With 
kind wishes for you as the mother of Gardner, I remain yours truly, 

[Signed] E. O. Shepard, 

Capt. Co. F, -^^d Mass. Vols. 

He was buried at Washington, D.C. 



WILLIAM HENRY JONES. 

The names of three brothers, sons of Nathaniel French of 
Hingham, who lost their lives in the service of their country, 
will be found among the heroic dead. Another instance in 
which three persons were taken from one family by the ravages 
of war occurs in connection with the record here given. 

William Henry Jones, the father- of William Henry, jun., and 
Gardner Jones, and son of Samuel Jones, was born in Boston, 
Mass., March 23, 18 16. For nearly thirty years before the 
war he had resided in Hingham, at the west part of the 
town, where he followed the occupation of bootmaker. He 
was highly esteemed by those who knew him most intimately, 
for his kindness of heart, his noble impulses, and his energetic 
and intrepid traits of character. For many years he was an 
efficient member of the fire-department in this town, and held 
various responsible positions in that sphere of duty. 



372 HINGHAM IN THE CIVIL WAR. 

Mr. Jones entered the United States service at Readville, 
under Capt. Benjamin F. Meservey, and was mustered Aug. 
24, 1 86 1, as private in Co. K of the Eighteenth Regiment, 
M. V. I., and accredited on the quota of Hingham. 

He was with the regiment in the skirmishes before York- 
town, and in the expedition to White House under Gen. Stone- 
man. But rapid marches, and exposures to a summer's sun, 
induced disease ; and on arriving at Harrison's Landing, July 2, 
1862, he was sent to Hampton Hospital, at Fortress Monroe, 
from which institution he was discharged March 6, 1863, for 
disability. 

With the quiet of home life came returning health ; and Jan. 
6, 1864, he re-enlisted, and was mustered as private in Co. C, 
Fourth Regiment of Cavalry, M. V. While in this arm of the 
service, in the Department of the South, he went with the expe- 
dition to John's Island, S.C, participating in the engagements 
and skirmishes of the 2d, 5th, 7th, and 9th of July. He also 
was at Pilatka, Fla., and in the expedition up Ashepoo River ; 
but whether he took part in any subsequent battles or skir- 
mishes does not appear. The adjutant-general, in his report, 
says William Jones died of wounds, Sept. 19, 1864, at Magnolia, 
Fla. 

He was forty-eight years and six months old at the time of 
decease, and left a widow and eight children, all of whom were 
then under sixteen years of age. 

In a letter written to Mrs. Jones by the captain of Co. C, 
relating to the death of her husband, occurs the following : — 

Headquarters Co. C, 4x11 Mass. Cavalry, 
Magnolia, Fla., Sept. 20, 1S64. 

Mrs. Jones, — I regret that it is my duty to be the bearer of sad 
tidings to you. Your husband, William H. Jones, died yesterday at one 
o'clock, of inflammation and ulceration of the bowels. 

He was ill but two weeks ; and it was only within the last few days that 
we supposed he was in a dangerous condition. An intimate friend from 
Hingham has attended him, and he had the best care and medical skill that 
could be procured. His last words and thoughts were about his family, and 
what they would do after his death. 

We buried him under the shade of a live oak, near our camp ; and I will 
see that a head-board and fence are erected there. 



IN MEMO RI AM. 



373 



It will doubtless be a satisfaction for you to know that he always did his 
duty promptly and well, and that he was a man upon whom I could always 
rely under any circumstances. He also was a favorite among his com- 
rades. 

[Signed] Very respectfully, your obt. servant, 

Edwin B. Staples, 
Capt. Co. C, ^ih Mass. Cavalry. 



WILLIAM HENRY JONES, Jun. 

Sergeant in Co. K of the Eighteenth Regiment, M. V. I. ; died 
at Washington, D.C., Feb. 12, 1864, aged 23 years. 

"Leaves have their time to fall, 

And flowers to wither at the north wind's breath. 
And stars to set ; but all. 

Thou hast all seasons for thine own, O Death ! " 

William Henry Jones, jun., son of William Henry and Eliza- 
beth (Glover) Jones, was born in Weymouth, Mass., Jan. 26, 
1 841. 

In early life his parents removed to Hingham, and he attended 
the public schools of the town. Subsequently he was in the 
employ of Rev, Calvin Lincoln ; and at a later period worked at 
the trade of tinman with Charles Gill. 

In May, 1861, young Jones joined the Lincoln Light Infantry 
at Fortress Monroe, as a volunteer. Returning with the com- 
pany, he followed his trade for a short time in Boston. 

Serg. Jones was among the first of those who re-enlisted in 
the service for Hingham, having been mustered at Readville, 
Aug. 26, i86r, under Capt. Benjamin F. Meservey, as private 
in Co. K of the Eighteenth Regiment, M. V. I., for three years. 
Sharing in all the engagements, marches, and privations of the 
regiment during his connection with it, he was promoted cor- 
poral, and afterwards sergeant, for bravery and good conduct. 
He was an especial favorite, and a peacemaker among his 
comrades. 

As was not often the case, father and son were for a time 



374 



HINGHAM IN THE CIVIL WAR. 



serving in the same company ; and the constant and respectful 
care shown by the son towards the father had a good influence 
throughout tlie regiment. 

His bravery before the enemy was in keeping with his moral 
character. At the battle of Second Bull Run, he was ordered 
to the rear with a wounded officer. Their route led them past 
Gen. King's division, just at the time it was attacked by the 
Confederate forces. Requesting permission of the wounded offi- 
cer to join the fight, he placed his charge under a tree, and went 
into the engagement with a strange regiment to assist in repuls- 
ing the attack. Acts like these were characteristic of this 
soldier-boy. 

After participating in many hard-fought battles, viz. : Second 
Bull Run, Shepardstown Ford, Fredericksburg, Chancellors- 
ville, Gettysburg, Rappahannock Station, and Mine Run, he was 
taken sick, and sent to the regimental hospital. For nearly 
three weeks his health continued to fail, and finally he was 
removed to Washington. 

The following extract relating to his death is from a letter 
written to his mother by one of the hospital stewards : — 

Washington, D.C, Feb. 14, 1864, Carver Hospital, Ward 16. 

. . . Although he had some fever, we did not consider him dangerously- 
ill. During Friday, the 12th, he spoke to me about the approaching expira- 
tion of his term of enlistment, and of his prospects of soon obtaining a fur- 
lough. Towards night, however, he seemed to be more feeble, and 
expressed a wish to see his mother. " There is not a day," he said, " but 
that she thinks of me." Shoi'tly afterwards he complained of nausea, and, 
in attempting to rise, fell back, as we supposed from faintness. We sent 
for the surgeons at once ; but they could do nothing, and he never spoke or 
moved again. This was at twenty-five minutes past eight o'clock on the 
evening of Feb. 12. 

[Signed] ' J. A. SiiAW. 



'& 



The remains of Serg. Jones were brought to Hingham for 
burial. His funeral ceremonies took place at the Universalist 
Church, Sunday afternoon, Feb. 21, 1864; Rev. John E. Daven- 
port, the pastor, making the address, and Rev. Calvin Lincoln 
of the First Parish assisting in the introductory and closing 
exercises. It was expected that the body would arrive in time 



IN MEMORIAM. 



375 



for these services ; but in this the relatives and friends were 
disappointed. The father and brother of the deceased (both 
soldiers) were present at the time, on furlough ; and it was on 
their account that the ceremonies were not postponed, as their 
time for being absent had nearly expired. The body of young 
Jones was afterwards buried in the cemetery at Fort Hill. 



CHARLES DAMON KILBURN. 

Corp. Charles Damon Kilburn, whose name is on the Soldiers' 
and Sailors' Monument, son of George Harris and Adeline 
(Damon) Kilburn, was born in Boston, June 22, 1839. 

On the 5 th of September, 1861, he enlisted at Boston as pri- 
vate in Co. B of the First Regiment, Mass. Cavalry, and was sub- 
sequently promoted corporal. 

The year 1863 was spent in the Department of Virginia ; and 
from the beginning to its close, one engagement followed another 
in rapid succession. At the battle of Chancellorsville, Va., May 
2 and 3, he was orderly for Major-Gen. Berry at the time this 
officer was killed, and was also orderly for Major-Gen. Sickles 
at the battle of Gettysburg, Va., when Sickles received the 
wound which deprived him of his leg. 

At the close of November, 1863, Corp. Kilburn was severely 
wounded, near Hope Church, Va., and immediately conveyed to 
McVeigh Hospital, Alexandria, where he died Jan. 4, 1864. 

The following tribute to his bravery and fidelity is taken 
from a Boston daily of Jan. 9, 1864 : — 

" Corp. Charles D. Kilburn belonged to the First Mass. 
Cavalry, and bravely bore his part in the duties performed by 
this admirable corps. He was wounded in the shoulder last 
November, and his demise was hastened by a second hemorrhage. 
He had three brothers in the service, and leaves many friends in 
this vicinity who mourn his death." 



3/6 HINGHAM IN THE CIVIL WAR. 

PARKER EMERY LANE. 

Born in Hingham, Oct. 19, 1840. His parents were Joshua 
Leavitt and Eliza (Shaw) Lane. At the outbreak of the war, 
he was a regular member of the Lincoln Light Infantry, and, 
leaving Hingham on the 17th of April, was three months with 
the company at Fortress Monroe. On being mustered out, he 
returned to Weymouth, where for some years he had resided, 
and where, after a protracted sickness, he died of consumption, 
Dec. 10, 1869. He left a widow. 

The following incident, among others connected with the 
departure of the Lincoln Light Infantry, is given in the military 
record of the State for 1862 : — 

A member of the company, calling to see his friends, and bid 
them adieu, was entreated by an aged relative to remain at home. 
Turning a deaf ear to her appeals, a liberal offer of money, 
much in excess of any sum he might expect to receive for his 
services in the field, was added as a persuasive. Although few 
in the ranks were really in greater need, all availed nothing. 
His answer was, " No, I cannot take it. I am a member of the 
Lincoln Light Infantry, and they are called for the defence of the 
country: where they go, I go.'' 

It is only necessary to add that the facts as given are correct; 
the hero of the story being young Lane, whose history is briefly 
sketched above. 



BENJAMIN LINCOLN. 

Benjamin Lincoln, son of Benjamin S. and Mary (Anderson) 
Lincoln, was born in Hingham, Sept. 29. 1835. 

He was a tinsmith by occupation. 

On the 6th of February, 1864, he enlisted as private in Co. G, 
Fourth Regiment of Cavalry, M. V., was mustered into service 
March i, left for the seat of war with the regiment, and was in 
active service until the 6th of June ; when, being sick and unfit 
for duty, he was sent to the hospital at City Point, Va. ; after- 



IN MEMORIAM. 



Z77 



wards transferred to the hospital at Portsmouth, Va. ; and lastly 
to Portsmouth Grove, R.I. 

Sept. 6, 1864, he received a furlough of thirty days, and re- 
turned to Hingham, where he had the professional services of 
Dr. R. T. P. Fiske. 

Shortly before the expiration of the furlough, his physician 
pronounced him too unwell to travel ; and, believing he had 
the requisite authority, granted an extension of the time allowed. 
This act, though well intended, proved the cause of much anxiety 
and suffering for Mr. Lincoln. The second day after the expira- 
tion of his original furlough, he was waited upon at his home by 
a messenger from Major Clark of the Fourth Cavalry, and 
ordered to report at headquarters forthwitJi. Complying with 
this demand, he was retained at the office of the provost-marshal 
in Boston one day and night ; was then taken without a hearing, 
and placed in a cell beneath the Court House, where, without 
food or bedding, he remained for nearly three days. At the end 
of this time he was returned to the hospital at Portsmouth 
Grove, and confined for seven days in the guard-house, suffering 
severely, and receiving daily visits from the surgeon. At the 
expiration of the week, he was ordered to report to the ward in 
the hospital, and there remained until released on a furlough for 
the purpose of attending the November election. Returning to 
the hospital, and being yet in feeble health, he was put upon 
light duty. 

Dec. 26, 1864, Mr. Lincoln was sent to Gallop's Island, Boston 
Harbor, and Feb. 9, 1865, to Fortress Monroe. From this 
place he was conveyed to Bermuda Hundred, and after two days 
returned to the Distributing Barracks at Hampton. 

March 9, 1865, he joined his company at Williamsburg, and 
remained with it until the 26th of November, when he was mus- 
tered out of service. 

Mr. Lincoln came back to Hingham bearing the seeds of dis- 
ease, which soon developed in the form of consumption. After 
a protracted and painful illness, which was patiently endured, he 

died March 29, 1 866, aged thirty years and six months. 
48 



378 HINGHAM IN THE CIVIL WAR. 



BENJAMIN CURTIS LINCOLN. 

Major of the Second Regiment, United States Colored Infantry, 
died of wounds received in battle at a place called " Natural 
Bridge," between St. Marks and Tallahassee, Fla., March 
9, 1865. 

" Now lies he low, no more to hear 
The victor's shout or clashing steel ; 
No more of war's rude cares to bear, 
No more kind sympathy to feel. 

Benjamin Curtis Lincoln, son of Alfred and Mary Lee (Curtis) 
Lincoln, was born in Hingham, Aug. 12, 1840. Relinquishing 
a good situation to respond to the call for troops, he enlisted in 
Boston, Aug. 7, 1862, and was mustered Sept. 2, for three years, 
as private in Co. G of the Thirty-ninth Regiment, M. V. I. ; pro- 
moted corporal, Jan. 15, 1863; released from duty with the 
regiment, July 14, 1863, and ordered to report to Major-Gen. 
Silas Casey, U. S. V., commanding provisional brigades at Wash- 
ington, D.C. ; honorably discharged July 31, 1863, to accept an 
appointment as captain of Co. B, Second U. S. Colored Infantry ; 
and July 20, 1864, commissioned major of the regiment. 

While in the Massachusetts Thirty-ninth, he was detailed as 
clerk, and served in that capacity a large part of the time. 

With the Second United States colored troops, stationed first 
at Ship Island, and subsequently at Fort Taylor, Key West, 
Fla., Major Lincoln devoted nearly every leisure hour at his 
command to the improvement of the men, teaching them to 
read, to write, and the use of money. At Key West he was 
attacked with yellow fever ; and, while many officers died of the 
disease, he lived, to fall afterwards on the field of battle. 

A correspondent of " The Boston Journal," writing from Key 
West under date of March 12, 1865, closes an account of the 
engagement between the Union forces under Brig.-Gen. Newton, 
and a large body of the enemy commanded by Major-Gen. 
Smith, as follows : — 



IN MEMORIAM. 



379 



" We regret to say that the loss among officers is very heavy 
in proportion to the men. 

" Major Lincoln was struck by a shell about noon of the 8th, 
and lingered to the 9th, when he expired. He was formerly in 
the employ of Haughton, Sawyer, & Co., of Boston, and had 
worked his way up from the ranks by untiring energy, intelli- 
gence, and force of character. He excelled as a disciplinarian, 
was thoroughly pure in his morals, and was ambitious as well as 
courageous. Major Lincoln is worthy to stand among the very 
few of New England's choicest sons who from principle have 
laid down their lives in battle. He had, it might be said, no 
faults ; and surely he had no enemies but his country's. His 
men loved him with unsurpassed devotion ; and his kindly, 
unselfish, and Christian character endeared him to all. 

" His life was indeed a costly sacrifice." 



DANIEL STODDER LINCOLN. 

Daniel Stodder Lincoln, son of Daniel and Priscilla (Cain) 
Lincoln, was born in Hingham, July 8, 1841. He was a 
descendant of Serg. Daniel Lincoln, one of the early settlers 

■ of the town. 

Shortly after the Lincoln Light Infantry arrived at Fortress 
Monroe, young Lincoln enlisted with the volunteers who went 
from Hingham to fill the ranks of the company, and was mus- 
tered into service May 18, 1861. Mustered out with the com- 
pany, July 22, 1 86 1. 

In 1864, Aug. I, he shipped in the United States Navy at 
Boston, as second-class fireman, for one year, and was sent on 
board the U. S. receiving ship " Ohio." From this vessel he 
was transferred to the U. S. iron-clad "Monadnock, " for duty 
during her trial trip, after which he returned to the " Ohio." 

Sept. 15, 1864, he was sent on board the U. S. supply steamer 



38o 



HINGHAM IN THE CIVIL WAR. 



" Connecticut," and in her made the trip from Boston to Mobile, 
stopping at Hilton Head, Key West, Pensacola, and intermedi- 
ate ports, to leave supplies and mails for the different ships 
stationed at these points. Returning in about six weeks, he 
was again ordered to the " Ohio." 

Nov. I, 1864, transferred to the U. S. steamer " luka," seven 
guns, then fitting out at Boston for the East Gulf blockading 
squadron, where she went, and was employed in cruising from 
Key West to Havana, along the coast of Cuba and Mexico, up 
as far as the Rio Grande and return. 

March 18, 1865, he was rated first-class fireman, and June 15, 
1865, was discharged at Boston by reason of close of the war. 

During the time young Lincoln was in the Navy, he filled his 
position so completely as to gain the approbation of those in 
command, and receive promotion. 

Upon returning home after the war, he was employed as shoe- 
maker, until stricken with scarlet fever. In his anxiety for the 
sufferings of another, he contracted this disease, and died May 
28, 1869, aged twenty-seven years, ten months, twenty days. 

He left a widow and one son. 



LEAVITT LINCOLN. 

Sergeant in Co. I, Sixty-first Regiment Illinois Volunteers ; died 
at the general hospital, Duval Bluffs, Ark., Dec. 7, 1864, aged 
forty-one years, nine months. 

Leavitt Lincoln, third son of Jotham and Meriel (Hobart) 
Lincoln, was born in Hingham, March 2, 1823. After completing 
his studies at school, he' went to Boston, and was employed for 
some time in the store of Gedney King, mathematical instrument 
maker. Returning to Hingham, he learned the trade of printer, 
and worked with Jedediah Farmer, and also with William W. 
Wilder, in "The Hingham Patriot" office. He was next in New 
York, following his occupation, and afterwards removed to Wis- 
consin ; thence he went to Pike's Peak, and at a later period 



IN MEMORIAM. 



381 



came to Chicago, 111., where h? was employed in a printing-office 
when the war broke out. 

He enlisted in Chicago, Dec. 27, 1861, for three years, and was 
mustered March 7, 1862, as private in Co. I, Capt. H. S. Good- 
speed, of the Sixty-first Regiment Illinois Volunteers ; promoted 
sergeant Sept. i, 1862. 

Serg. Leavitt Lincoln was present, and took an active part, in 
the battle of Pittsburg Landing ; his regiment losing nearly five 
hundred in killed, wounded, and missing. He afterwards partici- 
pated in other engagements, and shared the rough experience of 
a soldier's life until stricken by disease. His term of service had 
nearly expired, and he was anticipating a visit to his friends in 
the East, when the dread messenger came. He died of chronic 
diarrhoea. 

Capt. Goodspeed, in a letter to the relatives of the deceased, 
said, — 

He was a good soldier, brave and generous, beloved by all." 



<< 



SAMUEL MARSTON LINCOLN. 

Died of yellow fever, at Newbern, N.C., Oct. 2, 1864, aged 
twenty-two years and nine months. 

Samuel Marston Lincoln, brother of Major Benjamin C. Lin- 
coln, and son of Alfred and Mary Lee (Curtis) Lincoln, was born 
in Hingham, Dec. 28, 1841. 

Receiving his early education in the schools at the west part 
of the town, by good conduct, close application to study, and 
rapid progress, he invariably obtained the approbation of his 
teachers and school-officers. At a later period he was employed 
as salesman in Boston. 

Ambitious to render such assistance as he was able to offer in 
support of the government, he entered the army, and was mus- 
tered Oct. 9, 1 86 1, as private in Co. H of the Twenty-third Regi- 
ment, M. V. I. 

Mr. Lincoln was detailed as clerk in the quartermaster's 



382 HINGHAM IN THE CIVIL WAR. 

department, at the time of enlistment, and filled the position so 
acceptably, that a discharge from the army was obtained for him 
on a surgeon's certificate of disability, dated May 28, 1863, in 
order to secure his further services in this capacity. After a 
short visit home, he returned to his clerkship in the department 
at Newbern, N.C., and remained there until his death. 

During the prevalence of fever, scarcity of help brought 
increased duties; and, generously dividing his leave of absence 
among those more needy, he bore his own and others' hardships, 
and gave largely of his hours for rest to hospital labor, till the 
fatal disease seized him as one of its victims. He was taken sick 
on Thursday, and died the following Sunday. 



WARREN PARKER LINCOLN, 

Private in Co. A, Third Minnesota Cavalry, died at or near Fort 
Snelling, Minn., in the autumn of 1862, aged twenty-nine 
years. 

Warren Parker Lincoln enlisted at Minneapolis, Minn., Oct. 
10, and was mustered Oct. 28, 1861, as private in Co. A, Third 
Mnmesota Cavalry. 

For several months the regiment performed guard-duty at 
various Western posts. In March, 1 862, it was ordered to more 
active service, and at the battle near Murfreesboro", Tenn., July 
13, 1862, was captured, and all were made prisoners. They 
were soon paroled, and sent to Benton Barracks. Released in 
August, and ordered to Minnesota to fight the Indians. After 
several sharp conflicts with the enemy, a furlough of thirty days 
was obtained. It was during this furlough that private Lincoln 
received an accidental injury, which resulted in hemorrhage of 
the brain and death. 

Warren Parker Lincoln was born in Boston, Jan. 31, 1833. 
He was son of Warren (born in Hingham, Dec. 6, 1801), and 
Nancy (Parker) Lincoln. His funeral services took place at 
Minneapolis ; after which his remains were brought to this town, 
and buried in the Hingham Cemetery. 



IN MEMO RI AM. 383 



HENRY B. LIVINGSTON. 

Concerning this soldier whose name is upon the Soldiers' and 
Sailors' Monument, the Committee on Publication have but 
little to offer. They have neither been able to ascertain the 
names of his parents, nor the place or date of his birth. 

According to the printed record of the Massachusetts Volun- 
teers, published by the adjutant-general of this State (See vol. ii. 
page 999), Henry B. Livingston was mustered as private in the 
Veteran Reserve Corps, Oct. 26, 1863, and accredited to the 
quota of Hingham. He was then forty-seven years of age. 

From a communication furnished by Hon. B. W. Harris, we 
extract the followinsf : — 



■'o 



War Department, Adjutant-General's Office, 
Washington, D.C, March 25, 1874. 

It appears from the records of this office, that Henry B. Livingston, Co. 
D, 13th V. R. C, died May 21, 1864, from injuries received on railroad track. 

[Signed] E. D. Townsend, Adjutant-General. 



JOHN LEWIS MANUEL. 

John Lewis Manuel died suddenly at Fort Warren, Boston Har- 
bor, Aug. 19, 1862, aged thirty-two years, six months, and six- 
teen days. He was the oldest son of John and Mary (Lincoln) 
Manuel, and a native of Hingham, having been born in this 
town, Feb. 3, 1830. 

Residing at Green Hill, Hull, in the early part of the war, he 
left his occupation of shoemaker to enlist for duty at Fort 
Warren, and, with other young men from the adjoining village 
of North Cohasset, was mustered Feb. 5, 1862, as private in the 
First Unattached company of Heavy Artillery, and accredited to 
the quota of Cohasset. 

This company was afterwards designated as Co. A, First Bat- 



384 HINGHAM IN THE CIVIL WAR. 

talion Heavy Artillery, M. V. I. It was raised for special garri- 
son duty at Fort Warren, and was not called into active service 
in the field. A portion of the company, however, was occasion- 
ally employed in guarding prisoners and conscripts to and from 
remote places. 

Private Manuel was connected with one of these detachments 
in the summer of 1862, that was sent South to guard prisoners; 
and although his health seemed to be impaired after returning 
to the fort, yet he was able to report for duty until the day he 
died, as stated above. His remains were buried in the village 
cemetery at North Cohasset. 

He left a widow and five children. 



CHARLES HENRY MARSH. 

Private in Co. K, Eleventh Regiment, M. V. I., died May 6, 
1862, from wounds received the day previous at the battle of 
Williamsburg, Va. 

Charles Henry Marsh, the oldest son of Peter and Lydia 
(Hersey) Marsh, was born in Hingham, July 12, 1828. He was 
a carpenter by occupation. At the commencement of the war, 
and for several years previous, he resided in Dorchester, where 
he worked at his trade. From this place he enlisted in May, 
1 86 1, for three years, and was mustered into the United States 
service at Fort Warren, Boston Harbor, June 13, as private in 
Co. K of the Eleventh Regiment, M. V. I. 

The regiment left Fort Warren for Camp Cameron, Cam- 
bridge, June 17, thence, via New York City, Reading, Lebanon, 
and York, Pa., and Baltimore, Md., it arrived at Washington, 
D.C., July 3, and went into camp a short distance from the 
White House. 

Mr. Marsh participated in all the expeditions and engagements 
of the regiment up to the time of his death. At the first battle 
of Bull Run (July 21, 1861), he came near losing his life, but 
was spared to make the sacrifice on another field. 



IN MEMO R I AM. 385 

From a diary which he kept, commencing with the time of his 
enlistment, we make the following extracts : — 

^^ Friday, May 2, 1862. 

" Eleventh Regiment called up at half-past two this morning for fatigue- 
duty. At work on mortar batteries. One battery shelled out by the rebels. 
Cos. K and E continued at work in their position. Two men wounded. 
Rebels firing from heavy guns and field-pieces all day." 

The following entries were made by Capt. Benjamin Stone, 
jun., of Co. K : — 

^^ Sunday, May 4, 1862. 

" Enemy evacuated Yoilctown. Followed them as far as the works before 
Williamsburg, and camped. 

" Monday, May s, \d>62. 

" At 4, A.M., our brigade met the enemy, and fought all day. About 3, 
P.M., Charles H. Marsh, Co. K, nth Mass. Regiment, was shot and left on 
the field. 

" Tuesday, May 6, 1862. 

" Marsh died at eleven o'clock in the forenoon, and was buried on the 
field, the spot well marked." 

[Signed,] B. Stone, Jr., Capt. Co. K. 



CHARLES SELDEN MEADE. 

Charles Selden Meade, son of Francis K. and Clara Ann (Burn- 
ham) Meade, was born at Walpole, N.H., March i, 1844. 

While a lad, his parents removed to Hingham, Mass., and he 
attended the schools of the north and west districts. Subse- 
quently he was- employed a short time in the office of " The 
Hingham Journal," but soon gave his. attention to the acquire- 
ment of a better education, and was admitted a pupil in Phil- 
ips Academy, Exeter, N.H., where an elder brother was prepar- 
ing for college. Learning, while there, that a company was 
being formed in Hingham, he hastened home, and enlisted 
49 



386 HINGHAM IN THE CIVIL WAR. 

under Capt. Stephenson, at Camp Dimmick, and Nov. 12, 1861, 
was mastered into the U. S. service as private in Co. A, First 
Battalion, M. V., afterwards Thirty-second Regiment ; promoted 
corporal Sept. i, 1863, and sergeant Dec. 15, 1863. 

Serg. Meade was one of the younger members of the Thirty- 
second, and a great favorite. He took part with the regiment 
in the engagements at Malvern Hill, Second Bull Run, Antie- 
tam, Shepardstown Ford, Fredericksburg, Chancellorsville, Get- 
tysburg, Bristoe's Station, Rappahannock Station, and Mine Run, 
For his bravery and good conduct in battle he received promo- 
tion. 

At Liberty, Va., Jan. 4, 1864, he re-enlisted as a veteran, and 
came home on a thirty-days' furlough. It was the last visit he 
was to enjoy with relatives and friends. In less than a month 
after returning to camp, he met with an accidental injury 
(March 3), which resulted in pleurisy, congestion, and death. 
He was sick but three days. The sad intelligence was at once 
communicated to the relatives in Hingham ; and letters express- 
ing the most profound sorrow at the loss of one so young and 
promising were received from Cols. Prescott and Stephenson, 
Capts. Hamilton and Fuller, Lieuts. Reed, Drury, and others, 
offering words of comfort and consolation to the bereaved. To 
show the esteem in which this young patriot was held by the 
members of the regiment, we extract from the letters of our 
Hingham officers, Col. Stephenson and Lieut. Reed, the 
following : — 

Camp Thirty-Second Reg. Mass. Vols., Liberty, Va., March 7, 1864. 
Mrs. Meade. 

Dear Madam, — I presume ere this you have received my telegram an- 
nouncing the death of your son. The company to which he belonged has 
been detached from the regiment for some days, and I was not aware of his 
illness until an hour before he died. He was taken with pleurisy on Friday 
the 4th inst., and was not considered dangerously sick until last evening, 
when he was attacked with congestion of the lungs, and died about nine 
o'clock this morning. 

It would be useless for me, in your bereavement, to attempt to alleviate 
your sorrow; but I cannot refrain from giving my testimony to his worth as 
a soldier and ti man. Always ready and prompt in the performance of his 
duties, fearless in battle, of correct habits, kind and pleasant, he won the love 
and respect of all ; and no greater testimony could be given of his worth than 



IN MEMORIAM. 



387 



the sorrow evinced, and the sympathy expressed, not only among his imme- 
diate companions, but by all the officers and men of the regiment. 

Please accept my kindest sympathy for your loss, and believe me with 
respect, Yours truly, 

Luther Stephenson, Jr., 

Lieiit.-Col. "^id Mass. Vols, 

Lieut. Reed writes as follows : — 

Gamp of the 32D Regiment, Mass. Vols., Liberty, Va., March S, 1S64. 

My dear Madam, — I hardly know what to write in connection with 
your and our sad loss, but feel that a few lines in regard to Charlie's last mo- 
ments will interest you. Less than five days prior to his death he was in 
my tent, seemingly as well as usual. He was taken sick the same evening, 
but was not considered dangerous until Sunday evening; and before I could 
leave the regiment to see him, he had passed away. All was, done to save 
him, and make him comfortable, that could be. At first the physician said 
he had pleurisy ; but Monday morning at four o'clock, congestion of the 
lungs set in, and at nine o'clock he died. You know that I have been with 
him nearly every day since he joined the company ; and I am happy to bear 
testimony to his kind and generous nature, and worth as a son, a brother, 
and a friend. Every one in the regiment seemed to like him. The colonel 
has spoken freely in his praise ; and Capt. Hamilton esteemed him highly, 
promoting him at the first opportunity. 

His body is being embalmed, and we hope to enable you once more to 
look upon his loved form. The company were energetic in taking measures 
to send his body to you ; and although tearfully regretting the necessity, are 
grateful that it was their privilege to do even this in evidence of the affec- 
tionate regard they have ever cherished for him. Col. Stephenson has writ- 
ten you concerning the disposition of the body, which will be sent to the 
care of Mr. John Todd. . . . With much sympathy for you in this deep 
affliction, I am very respectfully yours, 

George R. Reed, 
Lieut. Co. A, and Acting Q. M. 2)2d Mass. Vols. 

The body of Serg. Meade was embalmed at Brandy's Station, 
and then sent to Hingham, the whole expense being paid by the 
company of which he was a member. 

Impressive and appropriate funeral services were held over 
the remains in the Baptist meeting-house in this town on Tues- 
day, the day after their arrival. The exercises were conducted 
by Rev. Jonathan Tilson, assisted by Revs. Calvin Lincoln, Starr, 
and Davenport. A procession was then formed, and escorted 



388 HINGHAM IN THE CIVIL WAR. 

by a detachment from Capt. Lyman B. Whiton's company of 
Heavy Artillery from Fort Independence, and the band of the 
fort, proceeded to the Hingham Cemetery, where the remains 
were deposited in the receiving-tomb. They were subsequently 
removed to a lot selected for the purpose. 

A marble stone erected at his grave bears the inscription, — 

SERGT. CHARLES S. MEx\DE. 

Co. A. 32D 

REGT. MASS. VOLS. 

DIED AT 

BEALTON STATION, VA., 
Mar. 7, 1864. 

AGED 20 YEARS. 

IN YEARS A YOUTH, 
A VETERAN IN THE 
SERVICE OF HIS COUNTRY. 



GEORGE HOWARD MERRITT. 

Was born in Scituate, Sept. 11, 1842. His parents were Henry 
and Isabel (Litchfield) Merritt. 

He was a resident of Hingham, and Aug. 9, 1862, with others 
from this town, entered the service of his country, enlisting in 
the Navy as landsman for one year. 

First taken on board the U. S. receiving-ship " Ohio," at the 
Navy Yard iit Charlestown, but soon transferred to the " North 
Carolina," at New York City. After remaining on board five 
weeks, was next sent to the U. S. receiving-ship " Brandywine," 
at Hampton Roads. Again changed, he was taken to the 
" Heitzel," in which he embarked for the scene of active opera- 
tions in the Sounds of North Carolina. Transferred to the 
" Louisiana," five guns, he was engaged in cruising off and on 
the seaboard, supporting land-forces, and in expeditions up the 



IN MEMORIAM. 



389 



rivers, co-operating in the general service, until stricken by dis- 
ease, and unfitted for duty. 

He died of swarhp-fever, Feb. 7, 1863, at the early age of a 
few months more then twenty years, and was buried from the 
hospital at Little Washington, N.C. 

A stone in the cemetery at South Scituate bears the simple 
record of the death of the young patriot ; and the monument 
erected by the town of Hingham includes in its list of the 
heroic dead the name of the deceased. 

" Is his sleep less sweet in the land where the wild winds swept him, 
Than if soothed to rest at home, and kin and friends had wept him ? " 



HENRY FELT MILLER. 

Corporal in Co. G, Thirty-ninth Regiment, M. V. I., died of 
wounds at Washington, D.C., May 25, 1864, aged nineteen 
years, three months, twenty-six days. 

Soldier, rest ! thy warfare o'er, 

Sleep the sleep that knows not breaking. 

Dreams of battle-fields no more, 
Days of danger, nights of waking. 

Henry Felt Miller, son of John and Martha (Elliot) Miller, was 
born at Salem, Mass., Jan. 30, 1845. Residing in Hingham, and 
following the trade of shoemaker, when the war broke out, he 
enlisted on the first quota of the town for three years, and was 
mustered at Lynnfield, Mass., Sept. 2, 1862, as private in Co. G 
of the Thirty-ninth Regiment, M. V. I. Promoted corporal in 
December, 1862, at Poolsville, Md. 

Corp. Miller fell mortally wounded, by a musket-ball in the 
head, at the first battle of the regiment. It was on Sunday 
morning. May 8, 1864, during a charge made upon the enemy 
over an open field, at Laurel Hill. For a short time he received 
such attention as the field hospital afforded, and was afterwards 
removed to the Stanton Hospital, at Washington, D.C., where 



390 



HINGHAM IN THE CIVIL WAR. 



he died. When taken from the field, he was able to give his 
name, and the regiment to which he belonged ; but soon became 
unconscious, and continued so until death relieved him from 
suffering. 

His remains were sent to Hingham for burial, and appropri- 
ate funeral services held at the Methodist Church, the pastor. 
Rev. William H. Starr, and Rev. Calvin Lincoln of the First 
Parish, officiating. 



DANIEL MURPHY. 

Daniel Murphy, son of Catharine (Creed) and the late John 
Murphy, was born in Boston, Mass., Nov. 22, 1840. 

He was by occupation a shoemaker, and in early life worked 
at this calling in Marblehead and Woburn. He subsequently 
went to sea in the coasting-trade ; but afterwards came to Hing- 
ham, and was employed at his vocation in the south part of the 
town. At a later period he went to New York, and, on the 
breaking out of the war, enlisted in Co. C, Fifteenth Regiment, 
N.Y. V. (engineers). Mustered into service at Willett's Point, 
June 25, 1 86 1, for two years. 

Private Murphy was connected with the regiment, and shared 
its dangers and exposures, until Nov. 15, 1862, when he was 
" discharged at Camp Alexander by reason of general debility, 
in consequence of chronic diarrhoea." No further information 
in regard to him appears upon the official records. He died in 
Hospital at Washington, D.C., some time prior to Nov. 24, 1862, 
when letters were received from the Sanitary Commission giv- 
ing information of his decease. 

His mother is still living in Hingham, where she has resided 
for many years. Her claim that her son should be classed as a 
citizen of Hingham is certainly just; "for," adopting her words, 
" if Hingham was not his home, the young man had no home." 



IN MEMORIAM. 



391 



JOHN SPAULDING NEAL. 

Private in Co. G, Thirty-ninth Regiment, M. V. I., died at 
Salisbury Prison, N.C., Jan. 16, 1865, aged thirty-three years 
and two months. 

John Spaulding Neal, son of John and Sarah (Hazelton) Neal, 
was born at Hebron, N.H., in November, 1831. Removing to 
Hingham with his parents, he afterwards followed the occupa- 
tion of shoemaker. 

When the town was in need of men to fill its first quota, Mr. 
Neal came forward and enlisted under recruiting-officer Edward 
Cazneau ; and Sept. 2, 1862, was mustered into service as pri- 
vate in Co. G of the Thirty-ninth Regiment, M. V. I. 

Mr. Neal shared the experience of his regiment during the 
first two years of its history. He took part in the battles of 
Laurel Hill, North Anna River, Petersburg, and Weldon Rail- 
road. Taken prisoner, with several others from Hingham 
belonging to Co. G, at the last-named battle, he was sent to 
Petersburg, and afterwards to Richmond, Va., where for a time 
he was confined in Libby Prison. Thence he was removed to 
Belle Isle, on the opposite side of James River ; and subsequently 
to the stockade prison at Salisbury, N.C., where he died of diar- 
rhoea, brought on by exposure, and the want of care and proper 
food. 

In a letter written to Mrs. Neal by a prison companion of the 
deceased, occurs the following : — 

"John was a good soldier and a much-loved comrade. His friends in the 
regiment were as numerous as the men, for he had no enemies. Ever kind 
to his companions and respectful to his officers, he was ready and willing to 
perform every duty imposed upon him. He deserved a better fate than 
that which has befallen him. But He who doeth all things well knows what 
is best for us, and to Him alone can we look in this hour of trouble for con- 
solation. 

[Signed] ALPHEUS THOMAS, 

2d Lieutenant Co. K, 39/// Mass. Vols." 



392 HINGHAM IN THE CIVIL WAR. 

HIRAM NEWCOMB, 2d. 

Hiram Newcomb, 2d, eldest son of Levi and Jane (Dawson) 
Newcomb, was born in Hingham, in January, 1842. 

He was a seaman. In the winter of 1863-4 enlisted in Co. 
E of the Thirty-second Regiment, M. V. I., three years, and was 
mustered on the 17th of February, this being the date of the 
expiration of the furlough granted the three hundred and thirty 
men of the regiment who had re-enlisted. With this body of 
troops, on their return to duty, he at once became connected 
with the Army of the Potomac, and up to the close of the war 
had his full allotment of the labors, privations, and perils of a 
soldier's life. 

He was in the battles of the Wilderness, Laurel Hill, Spottsyl- 
vania, North Anna, Tolopotomy, Bethesda Church, Petersburg, 
and Weldon Railroad. 

On the 28th of June, 1865, he was mustered out at Washing- 
ton, and the day following left for Boston, where he arrived 
Saturday, July i, and where at Gallop's Island, July 11, he was 
honorably discharged, having been in the service one year and 
nearly five months. 

Though in good health at the time of enlistment, it was evi- 
dent, that, through exposure and privation, his native strength and 
vigor were rapidly departing. Consumption was gathering what 
the bullet had spared. Returning to Weymouth, where his 
family had resided during his absence, he there lingered until 
Oct. 15, 1867, when he died, at the age of twenty-five years and 
five months, leaving a widow and one son. His remains were 
interred in the Hingham Cemetery. 



ANDREW P. OLSON. 

From North Bridgewater (town authorities say resident of Hing- 
ham). Served for the second quota of this town. Was cor- 
poral in Co. C of the Forty-second Regiment, M. V. I., nine 



IN ME MORI AM. 



393 



months; and was mustered Oct. 11,1862, then twenty-eight 
years of age. 

In the absence of the record of this soldier, few particulars 
of his history can be given. It appears from the report of the 
adjutant-general, that his death took place Aug. 9, 1863, in New 
York City. As scarcely four weeks had passed since the expi- 
ration of his term of enlistment, it seems probable that his death 
must have been the result of disease contracted while in the 
service. 

Though the name is not found on the Soldiers' and Sailors' 
Monument, Mr. Olson enlisted under recruiting-officer Edward 
Cazneau, and received the bounty offered by the town. 



PETER OURISII. 

Sergeant in Co. E, Thirty-second Regiment, M. V. I., died of 
wounds at the Stanton Hospital, Washington, D.C., June 8, 
1864, aged nineteen years, one month, and twenty-three days. 

Peter Ourish, second son of Simon and Agnes (Hoser) Ourish, 
and brother of Jacob Ourish of the Lincoln Light Infantry, 
and Thirtieth Regiment, was born in Buffalo, N.Y., April 15, 
1845. After the family removed to Hingham, he attended the 
public schools of the North Ward. 

At the age of sixteen, he was a large, sturdy, well proportioned 
young man." Many of his older acquaintances had enlisted ; the 
company under Capt. Stephenson had already left Hingham, and 
accessions were rapidly being made to another company at 
Oasis Hall by Lieut. Lyman B. Whiton, when young Ourish 
came forward to join the latter, and, giving his age as eighteen, 
was accepted as a recruit, and accredited to the quota of 
Hingham. 

He was mustered into service as private in Co. E of the First 

Battalion Infantry, M. V., afterwards Thirty-second Regiment, 

Dec. 2, 1 86 1 ; promoted corporal Oct. 14, 1862 ; re-enlisted as 

veteran volunteer, Jan. 5, 1864; promoted sergeant, and in 

50 



394 



HINGHAM IN THE CIVIL WAR. 



this position continued to serve acceptably during the remainder 
of the time he was connected with tlie regiment. 

The battles in which he took part were Malvern Hill, Second 
Bull Run, Antietam, Fredericksburg, Chancellorsville, Gettys- 
burg, Rappahannock Station, Mine Run, Wilderness, Laurel 
Hill, North Anna, and Tolopotomy Swamp. In the last engage- 
ment he was seriously wounded in the shoulder, and, after a 
confinement of eight days, died at the Stanton Hospital, Wash- 
ington, D.C. 

Thus did another of our soldier-boys pass away. He fell at 
the post of duty, while gallantly fighting for the old flag ; and 
the testimony of all is, that he served his country nobly and 
well. By strict adherence to military discipline, he dignified his 
position, and won the respect of his comrades and the good opin- 
ions of his superiors. An officer of the same regiment says 
" He was not only a brave, conscientious, and faithful soldier, but 
a youth of pure character, one upon whom the vices and bad 
habits of camp-life made no impression." 

His remains were brought to Hingham for interment; and the 
funeral services were held at the meeting-house of the Third 
Parish, on Sunday morning, June 19, when the pastor. Rev. 
Joshua Young, delivered an appropriate address. Other clergy- 
men also were present, and assisted in the exercises. The body 
was followed to its last resting-place, in the Hingham Cemetery, 
by a large number of relatives and friends. 

He left a widowed mother, who has since died, and several 
brothers and sisters. 

" Freedom hallows with her tread 
The silent cities of the dead." 



ALBERT L. PIERCE. 



Age 21. 



Was first a member of the Lincoln Light Infantry, and left 
Hingham, May 18, 1861, with the volunteers who had enlisted 



IN MEMORIAM. 



395 



to fill up the ranks of the company, then in service at Fortress 
Monroe. 

After returning home, he re-enlistecl, and Nov. i, 1861, was 
mustered as corporal in Co. A of the Thirty-second Regiment, 
M. V. I., three years. His connection with the army was brief. 
The regiment had but commenced its career, afterwards so sig- 
nally active and eventful, ere disease obliged him to leave the 
field ; and he was discharged from service by reason of disability, 
Aug. 2, 1862. 

He died at Freedom, N.H., Dec. 6, 1S64. 



DANIEL W. PENDERGAST. 

Resident of Hingham, age 27. 

Private in Co. G of the Forty-fifth Regiment, M. V. M., nine 
months. 

Enlisted as private Sept. 26, 1862, in Co. G. On the _5th of 
November, left Boston for Newbern, assigned to the Department 
of North Carolina. A short time was spent in camp on the 
banks of the Trent ; after which Co. G was detached, and sent 
to Fort Macon to form a part of the garrison of that post. 
Towards the close of April, being relieved from duty at Fort 
Macon, he was transferred to Fort Spinola, and afterwards 
rejoined the regiment, which continued in camp near this place 
during the remainder of his term of enlistment. 

In the course of his service, Mr. Pendergast was detailed for 
the corps of sappers and miners. Here periods of over-exertion 
were often followed by exposure to cold and wet, and he was 
mustered out sick and disabled. Returning home, he never 
recovered the health possessed at the time of joining the army, 
but, gradually failing, at last fell a victim of consumption. 

Served for the quota of Plingham, and received the bounty 
offered by the town. 



396 HINGHAM IN THE CIVIL WAR. 

ELIJAH PROUTY. 

From Weymouth, age 26. 

Enlisted in August, 1862, under recruiting officer Edward Caz- 
neau, for the first quota of Hingham ; and Sept. 2 was mus- 
tered as private in Co. G, Thirty-ninth Regiment, M. V. I., 
three years. 

According to the report of the adjutant-general of Massachu- 
setts, he died Dec. 9, 1863, at Washington, D.C. 

Mr. Prouty was a volunteer in the Lincoln Light Infantry ; 
left Hingham with the first detachment, April 17, 1861 ; and was 
three months at Fortress Monroe and vicinity. 

Though not on the Soldiers' and Sailors' Monument, he was 
recognized as serving for the quota of Hingham, and received 
the bounty offered by the town. 



SEWALL PUGSLEY. 

Drafted at Taunton Mass., July 20, 1863, to fill the quota re- 
quired at the time from the town of Hingham ; mustered as 
private in Co. F of the Twenty-second Regiment, M. V. I., 
three years, on the 28th of the following August. 

Sewall Pugsley was born in Hiram, Me., March 20, 1831. His 
parents were Seth and Jerusha (Hartford) Pugsley. After 
removing to South Hingham, he was employed in the factory of 
Messrs. Joseph Jacob & Son, and married a daughter of the late 
Henry Gushing, Esq. 

At the time of the draft, he was in feeble health, as he had 
been for some years previous, and was evidently unfit for the 
service required. The authorities, however, thought differently, 
and declined to grant the exemption Mr. Pugsley earnestly 
desired, and which his condition really demanded. Not having 
the means to purchase commutation, and at the same time pro- 
vide for the needs of his young family, he yielded to the destiny 



IN MEMORIAM. 



397 



the draft seemed to have decreed, and gave his life a sacrifice 
for his wife and children. 

Joining the Twenty-second Regiment at the seat of war, he 
was engaged for a few weeks in active duty along the Rapidan, 
and on one occasion took part in the capture of a large number 
of prisoners. Camp-life, however, soon developed anew the 
disease which even under the comforts of home often unfitted him 
for labor, and he was conveyed to the hospital at Mount Pleas- 
ant, Washington, D.C., where at the end of eight days, and but 
eleven weeks from the time of entering the army, he died of 
chronic diarrhoea, Nov. 12, 1863, aged thirty-two years. 

Of the large number of natives or residents of Hingham who 
were engaged in the civil war, but three instances of involuntary 
service are known. In common with Mr. Pugsley, these in- 
stances were severally the result of the draft at Taunton on the 
20th of July, 1863. Their story is briefly told. Escaping dis- 
ease and the casualties of the field, one returned safely home. 
Of the second, nothing is known respecting his fate. Falling in 
battle, he probably filled the grave of an unrecognized soldier. 
And lastly the subject of this notice, dying from disease a few 
weeks only from the time of parting from his home and family. 

In view of the liberality of our citizens exemplified shortly 
after in repeated and yet cheerful contributions of money ade- 
quate to whatever the needs of the hour demanded, the occur- 
rence of these exceptional cases of coerced service, and their 
melancholy results, must be generally deplored. 



JOSHUA ROACH. 

Thirty-eight years of age. 

Entered the service Aug. 21, 1862, as private in Co. H of the 
Thirty-eighth Regiment, M. V. I. Beyond the date of his 
decease, which took place on the first day of June, 1863, no 
further particulars with regard to his history can be given. 

Enlisted for three years, to serve for the quota of Hingham. 



398 HINGHAM IN THE CIVIL WAR. 



JAMES G. RAYMOND. 

From the town of Weymouth ; corporal in Co. D of the Fourth 
Regiment of Cavalry, M. V., three years. 

He entered the service Jan. 9, 1864, then eighteen years of 
age, and died at Hilton Head, S.C, on the 24th of the following 
May. 

The adjutant-general in his report erroneously gives the time 
of enlistment as Jan. 9, 1865. 

Mr. Raymond was a farmer by occupation, and recruited by 
the citizens' committee of Hingham. 



WILLIAM WESLEY ROBINSON. 

William Wesley Robinson was the eldest son of Nahum, and 
Margaret (Roberts) Robinson, and was born in Hingham, 
April 14, 1835. 

On the 17th of April, 1861, at Faneuil Hall, Boston, he joined 
Co. H of the Fourth Regiment, as private, and left at once for 
Fortress Monroe and vicinity, serving three months. Although 
quite deaf, he performed all the duties of a soldier in a faithful 
manner, and was honorably discharged at Long Island, Boston, 
at the expiration of his term of enlistment. 

After a short stay at home, he again entered the service, en- 
listing at Readville, Mass., Aug. 24, 1861, as private in Co. K of 
the Eighteenth Regiment, M. V. I., three years. Being pre- 
sented for examination, the surgeon pronounced his deafness a 
disqualification, and he was accordingly rejected. Disappointed 
and almost disheartened, he appealed to Capt., now Major Ben- 
jamin F. Meservey, under whom he had served while at Fortress 
Monroe, when, by virtue of the influence of this officer, added 
to the soldier's emphatic declaration that " he was not too deaf 
to fight," the surgeon at last granted a reluctant consent. Most 
faithfully was Mr. Robinson's part of the contract performed : a 
better or braver soldier was never passed by any surgeon. 



IN MEMORIAM. 



399 



He was in the engagement at Yorktown, on the Peninsula, at 
Second Bull Run, Shepardstown, Fredericksburg, Gettysburg, 
Rappahannock Station, Mine Run, and in most of the principal 
engagements in the Department of Virginia. ' 

Of the whole regiment, he was notedly one of the most daring 
and desperate. He fought at all times in a spirit of the most 
determined bravery; and on several occasions was so utterly 
exhausted by the labor and excitement of the conflict, that the 
aid of others became necessary to enable him to leave the field. 
Under an experience naturally marked out by a spirit such as 
his, physical strength and vigor began at last to yield ; and on 
the 9th of March, 1864, he was transferred to the Veteran 
Reserve Corps for disability. 

Entering the army in the possession of perfect health, he 
returned home after the expiration of his term of enlistment, 
bearing with him the seeds of death. For a time he feebly 
labored at his trade, gradually sinking under the influence of a 
disease nothing could stay or avert, and at last died at Braintree, 
Mass. He was buried in the cemetery at North Weymouth. 

During his sickness, he was often urged by friends to apply 
for a pension ; but this he steadily refused to do. Becoming 
however, entirely disabled, he at last sought assistance from the 
government he had sacrificed his life to preserve. The surgeons 
before whom he was brought for examination decided that 
" though evidently very sick, the disease might have been con- 
tracted before entering the service," and, notwithstanding the 
testimony of his officers to the excellence of his health and 
strength at the time of enlistment, declined to grant the 
aid desired. In four weeks from the time of this refusal, the 
applicant was dead. 

Unquestionably many claims for pensions are made which are 
really groundless ; but it is earnestly hoped there are few in" 
stances where so great an injustice has been done a brave and 
dutiful soldier as in this. 



400 



H INCH AM IN THE CIVIL WAR. 



DENNIS SCULLY. 



Private in Co. D, Fourth Regiment of Cavalry, M. V., died of 
small-pox, at the hospital, Beaufort, S.C., April 26, 1864, 
aged twenty-nine years, seven months. 

Dennis Scully, son of Daniel and Margaret (Shea) Scully, was 
born in September, 1834, in the Parish of Eniscarra, County 
Cork, Ireland. 

He became a resident of Hingham, Mass., some eight or nine 
years before the war, and was employed successively at South 
Hingham, in the cordage factory at Hingham Centre, and for 
several years in the foundry at the Harbor, where he was still in 
service at the time of enlistment. 

Joining the camp at Readville, he was mustered the 9th of 
January, 1864, as private in Co. D, Fourth Regiment of Cavalry, 
M. v., and accredited to the quota of Hingham. 

Leaving Massachusetts, the regiment was stationed in South 
Carolina, where Dennis died shortly after its arrival. 

In a communication from Capt. Morton of Co. D, to the late 
Edward Cazneau, Esq., of this town, occurs the following : 
" Dennis Scully was a quiet man, of unassuming manner, a 
friend to every one, and was always ready and willing to do his 
duty. He died in the firm assurance that the faith which had 
been his guidance through life would maintain those whom he 
was to leave, and support him in that world which was fast 
opening to his view." 

He left a family and an aged mother. 



JOSEPH SIMMONS. 

Joseph Simmons, born in Scituate, April 11, 1829, was a son of 
Peleg and Lucy (Damon) Simmons. 

After completing his school studies in his native town, he 
learned the shoemaker's trade, and this occupation he con- 



IN MEMORIAM. 



401 



tinued to follow until failing health induced him to seek some 
out-door employment. At the time of enlisting, he was engaged 
in farming. 

With several young men from South Scituate, he joined the 
first quota of Hingham, under recruiting-officer Edward Cazneau, 
and was mustered Sept. 2, 1862, as a private in Co. G of the 
Thirty-ninth Regiment, M. V. I. This regiment was not 
engaged in any general battle during the time he was connected 
with it. Like many of our brave soldier-boys, however, who 
were stricken with disease, he as truly gave his life to his coun- 
try as did those who fell upon the battle-field. His comrades 
speak of him as a good and loyal soldier, who was earnestly 
devoted to the old flag, and to the preservation of the Union. 

He was taken sick at Culpepper, in December, 1863, and sent 
to the regimental hospital. Thence he was removed to Washing- 
ton, D.C, where he died. His remains were subsequently taken 
to South Scituate, and buried in the cemetery at Assinippi Vil- 
lage. 

He left a widow and three children. 

A marble stone erected to his. memory bears the inscription : 

JOSEPH SIMMONS, 

DIED 

AT WASHINGTON, D.C, 

MARCH 3, 1864, 

AGED 34 YR'S I 1 MOS. 

OUR LOVED ONE SLEEPS 
FOR HIS COUNTRY S FLAG. 



EDWARD AUGUSTUS FRANKLIN SPEAR. 

Private in Co. G of the Thirty-ninth Regiment, M. V. I. 
Enlisted at Hingham Aug. 8, 1862 ; mustered Sept. 2 ; taken 
prisoner Aug. 19, 1864; and died at Salisbury, N.C. 

The subject of this sketch was born at Norwich, Vt., March 

SI 



402 HINGHAM IN THE CIVIL WAR. 

13, 1828. His parents were Edward Spencer and Hannah (Bates) 
Spear. 

Removing to Hingham, he married a daughter of the late 
Nathaniel French, sen., and after the outbreak of the war enlisted 
for three years, as before stated. He shared in the battles of 
Mine Run, Wilderness, Spottsylvania, North Anna, Cold Harbor, 
and also in different engagements about Petersburg, from June 
21 to Aug. 19, 1864, when, at the battle of the VVeldon Railroad, 
he was taken prisoner. 

In the hands of the enemy, he was first removed to Belle Isle, 
and then to SaUsbury, N.C., where he remained until death, 
which took ])lace from pneumonia, on the 20th of January, 1865. 
He was thirty-seven years of age, and his term of service includ- 
ed nearly two and a half years. 

Never remiss in duty, but always faithful to the cause of his 
country, he died a good citizen and a brave soldier. 



SAMUEL SPENCER. 



Resident of Hingham. 



Mustered June 76, 1861, as private in Co. E of the Twelfth 
Regiment, M. V. I. 

Young Spencer was among the first that entered the service 
for three years. His term of enlistment had almost expired, 
when he was mortally wounded, while on duty in the trenches, 
by a bullet from one of the enemy's sharpshooters. 

He was about twenty years of age, and died at City Point, Va., 
June 25, 1864, the jday preceding the expiration of his term of 
service. 

" He rests with those who every danger braved. 
Unmarked, untrophied, 'mid the soil they saved." 



IN MEMORIAM. 403 



THOMAS SPRAGUE, 2d. 

Private in Co. G, Thirty-ninth Regiment, M. V. I., three years; 
died AjDril 29, 1864, of disease contracted in the service. 

Thomas Sprague, 2d, a resident of Hingham, Vv-as the young- 
est son of Amos and Mary (Clark) Sprague, and was born Oct. 
25, 1826. 

On the 2d of September, 1862, he enlisted, as previously stated, 
and left for the seat of war in the vicinity of Washington, Sept. 
6. After a brief period of service, he was detailed as pioneer ; in 
which capacity his fidelity not only attracted the attention of his 
comrades, but was commended at headquarters. 

In the winter of 1863-4, being disabled by disease, he was 
transferred to the Stanton Hospital at Washington, D.C., where 
he died April 29, 1864, aged thirty-seven years. Possessed of a 
large degree of physical strength and endurance, his sickness 
was severe and protracted. 

It is due to the memory and character of the deceased, to add 
that he was honest, temperate, faithful. The duly assigned to 
him was never imposed on another; while to the cheerful, uncom- 
plaining spirit with which he bore the trials and privations of 
camp-life, his companions bear their undivided testimony. 

He was a laborer, unmarried, and at the time of joining the 
army left an aged widowed mother dependent on him for sup- 
port. 



WILLIAM JOHNSON STOCKWELL. 

The subject of this memoir was a son of Otis and Elvira 
(Gilman) Stockwell, and was born in Hingham, Feb. 24, 1842. 
After receiving the educational advantages of the public schools, 
he found employment for awhile in a lithographic printing estab- 
lishment in the city of Boston, but subsequently was employed 
by Mr. David Gushing, jun., of Hingham, with whom he was 
engaged when news of the attack on Fort Sumter awoke the 
patriotic North to arms. The Lincoln Light Infantry promiptly 



404 



H INCH AM IN THE CIVIL WAR. 



responded to the president's call ; and young Stockwell took his 
place as a volunteer in the ranks, April 17, 1 861, to join the 
defenders of the nation. Serving the three months' term of 
enlistment, he returned home, and after a short stay again en- 
listed, and was mustered Nov. 29, 1861, for three years, as pri- 
vate in Co. I, Capt. Kelty, of the Thirtieth Regiment, M. V. I. 

The regiment was attached to Gen. Butler's division, and did 
valiant service amid the scorching heat and pestilence-breathing 
bayous of Louisiana. 

At the battle of Baton Rouge, and the prolonged conflict 
before Port Hudson, it bore a conspicuous part. For nearly 
six weeks it acted as sharpshooters, or was engaged in support- 
ing batteries at the latter stronghold. A portion of this time, 
it lay during the day behind logs, exposed to the burning rays 
of the sun, which thinned its ranks more rapidly than the 
enemy's bullets. 

After the battle of Port Hudson, while on the way to Donald- 
sonville, the regiment had a sharp engagement with the enemy ; 
and of the company to which young Stockwell belonged, only 
nine survived that battle. Nowhere during the war were fiercer 
conflicts fought, or more heroic bravery displayed, than during 
this campaign. 

Exposed to the malarious influences of the climate, so fatal to 
Northern constitutions, subjected to the most arduous military 
duty, private Stockwell was one of the many who fell victims to 
disease engendered by the climate. He died of typhus fever, 
in the hospital at Baton Rouge, Aug. 9, 1863, after an illness of 
only three days, aged twenty-one years, five months. 

His death was deeply lamented by his associates, to whom he 
had greatly endeared himself by his quiet and unobtrusive man- 
ners and kindness of heart. 

His remains rest in the soil which he helped to redeem ; but in 
the home of his childhood his memory will be cherished and his 
name honored. 

" What though brief his date ? 
We reckon life by deeds, not years : 
That life is long which answers life's great end." 



IN MEMO R I AM. 405 



DEMERICK STODDER. 

Private in Co. F of the Thirty-second Regiment, M. V. I. ; 
killed at the battle of Gettysburg, Pa., July 2, 1863, aged 
twenty-three years, seven months, nine days. 

" How sweetly they sleep who have died for their country. ^ 
And never will wake for the combat again ; 
But mantled with glory they peacefully slumber, 
And rest from their toil in the graves of the slain." 

Demerick Stodder, son of Demerick and Maria (Bassett) 
Stodder, was born in Hingham, Nov. 23, 1839. He was by 
occupation shoemaker, and a descendant from John Stodder, 
who came to Hingham in 1638. 

Private Stodder was one of the thirty-seven volunteers that 
left Hingham May 18, 1 861, to join the Lincoln Light Infantry 
at Fortress Monroe, and returned with the company at the expi- 
ration of its service of three months. 

Re-enlisting upon the quota of Hingham, he was mustered at 
Fort Warren, Feb. 20, 1862, for three years, as private in 
Co. F of the First Battalion Infantry, M. V., afterwards Thirty- 
second Regiment ; and while connected with this organization, 
shared its experience with the Army of the Potomac. 

The battles in which he took part were Malvern Hill, Second 
Bull Run, Antietam, Fredericksburg, Chancellorsville, and Get- 
tysburg. 

He was instantly killed by a shot in the forehead from a rifle, 
at about sunset, on the first day of the fight at Gettysburg. 

Private Stodder was a good soldier, always cheerful, and dis- 
posed to make the best of circumstances, whether on the march 
or in camp, and remarkably brave and impetuous in battle. 
Gen. Stephenson says, " Demerick Stodder was one of our relia- 
ble men;" and this statement is confirmed by the testimony of 
Capt. Reed and other officers. 

His remains were buried on the battle-field by his comrades, 
the night of July 3, but, subsequently were deposited in the 
National Cemetery at Gettysburg. 



406 HINGHAM IN THE CIVIL WAR. 

WASHINGTON IRVING STODDER. 

Private in Co. F, Thirty-second Regimejit, M. V. I., three years ; 
promoted corporal; re-enlisted Jan. 4, 1S64, for the remainder 
of the war ; mortally wounded near Spottsylvania Court 
House, May 12, and died May 14, 1S64. 

Washington Irving Stodder, son of Caleb and Esther Saunders 
(Gardner) Stodder, was born in Hingham, Aug. 26, 1841. 

Responding to the earnest appeals for aid in support of the 
cause of the Union, young Stodder enlisted at Boston on the 
15th of February, 1862, and July 2 was promoted corporal. 
Continually at the front, his whole career was signally character- 
ized by constant exposure, long marches, and numerous engage- 
ments. Never discouraged, he cheerfully acquiesced in the for- 
tune of war, and looked bravely forward to the full triumph of 
the cause he had taken arms to sustain. 

His list of battles includes nearly all set down to the Thirty- 
second_ Regiment. Beginning at Malvern Hill, he fought at 
Second Bull Run, Antietam, Fredericksburg, Chancellorsville, 
Gettysburg, Rappahannock Station, Wilderness (May 4, 5, 6, and 
7), and many other less important engagements. 

Never wounded nor disabled by sickness, he had escaped the 
perils incident to a soldier's life. But on the 12th of May, 1864, 
— a dark day in the history of our young patriot, — he entered 
the field for his last conflict. Stricken by a bullet in the strug- 
gle near Spottsylvania Court House, he fell mortally wounded, 
and was conveyed to the field hospital, where he died, aged 
twenty-three years. 



HORACE L. STUDLEY. 

Private in Co. E of the Thirty-second Regiment, M. V. I., three 
years; died at Hingham, April i, 1864. 

Horace L. Studley, son of Homer and Lydia (Jenkins) Stud- 
ley), was born in Scituate, Mass., Sept. 24, 1837. Leaving home. 



IN MEMORIAM. 407 

he came to Hingham, and was apprenticed to Samuel G. Bailey, 
housewright. After his majority he still remained in town, fol- 
lowing his trade, until Dec. 2, 1861, when he enlisted at Hing- 
ham for three years. 

From the 15th of August, 1862, he shared in the numerous 
rapid marches of the Thirty-second down the Peninsula to New- 
port News, and its progress towards Washington, until he 
reached the vicinity of Warrenton Junction, Before arriving 
here, and afterwards on the route to Manassas Gap, many 
of the men fell out utterly exhausted and disabled, Mr. Studley 
among the number. Removed to the regimental hospital near 
Fredericksburg, his health gradually declined up to the month 
of January, 1863, when a furlough was granted, and he left for 
home. Stopping at Hingham, and being too weak and ex- 
hausted to proceed further, he was removed to the residence of 
Capt. Thomas King, into whose family he was kindly welcomed, 
and whose generous hospitality made their house at once the 
invalid's home. After a lingering sickness of nine weeks, during 
which he was attended by those he most loved and esteemed, 
and provided with every comfort the hand of affection, or even 
parental kindness, could supply, death came to his release, April 
I, 1863, at twenty-six years of age. 

The record of private Horace L. Studley is unblemished. As 
a soldier he evaded no duty ; as a citizen he was temperate, indus- 
trious, faithful, honest. As a Christian, exemplary and sincere. 
Quiet and unobtrusive in manner, uniformly kind and obliging, 
a man of strict integrity and purity of character, he died beloved 
and respected by all who knew him. 

His life, though closed by disease, was the life of a patriot, 
nobly sacrificed on the altar of his country. 



HENRY SWEARS. 

Born in Hingham. 

Son of William Swears. 

Enlisted from Weymouth, to which place the family had 
removed some years before the occurrence of the war. 



4o8 



HINGHAM IN THE CIVIL WAR. 



Mustered June 26, 1861, as private in Co. H of the Twelftli 
Regiment, M. V. I. 

Killed Dec. 13, 1862, at Fredericksburg, Va. 

Mr. Swears was about twenty years of age ; and his name is 
found on the Soldiers' and Sailors' Monument of the town of 
Weymouth. 



FRANCIS THOMAS. 

[Communicated.] 

Was the son of William and Rachel (Beal) Thomas, and was 
born in Hingham, Feb i, 1844. 

At the outbreak of the rebellion, he seemed to divine its mag- 
nitude, and intimated to his family his intention to enlist. 
Being expostulated with on account of his youth, he replied, " I 
can be better spared than those of you who have families." 

Shortly after, on the 26th of June, 1861, he enlisted for the 
quota of the town of Weymouth, in Co. H of the Twelfth Regi- 
ment, M. V. I., three years ; and was the first of five brothers, 
natives of Hingham, who entered the field for the support of 
the Union, His rank at the time of joining- the army was 
sergeant-major ; but his fidelity, added to manly courage, 
soon attracted the attention of his superior officers, and he was 
recommended for promotion. Complying with their request. 
Gov. Andrew, on the 9th of September, 1862, awarded him a 
commission as second lieutenant, and soon after promoted him 
to first lieutenant, finally appointing him as adjutant of the 
regiment. 

In January of 1863, he was still further advanced by being 
commissioned inspector of the second brigade, second division, of 
the First Army Corps. Here he proved a competent, brave, and 
faithful officer, with every prospect of future distinction and use- 
fulness, until the 3d of July, 1863, when, in mortal combat with 
the foes of his country, he fell in . the struggle at Gettysburg. 
The promise of a brilliant and prosperous career went suddenly 
down in the death of the young soldier and patriot. 

Said the colonel of his regiment, " I loved him as a son." The 



IN MEMORIAM. ^OQ' 

general commanding his division says of him :. " He was un- 
wearied on the march, faithful and diligent in the performance of 
his duties, fearless in action, and beloved by all who knew him. 
Brothers and sisters should have been proud to call him 
brother, and parents should thank God who gave them such a 
son ! " Said Gen. Grant, " That man is every inch a soldier." 

" But his duty to his country is done : his record is immortal. 
Beneath the soil he so bravely defended, his body lies ; while 
upon the slope of the eternal hills, let us believe his soul lives 
sweetly on, tented in the folds of peace forever ! " 



MICHAEL FRANCIS THOMPSON. 

Michael Francis Thompson, son of Daniel and Mary (Brennan) 
Thompson, was born in Mountrath, Queen's County, Ireland, 
March 9, 1840. 

While yet a boy, the family emigrated to this country, and 
took up its residence in Hingham. After receiving the benefit 
of our public schools, he was employed in the spike-factory at 
the harbor, and subsequently at the blind-and-sash factory on 
South Street. 

Mr. Thompson was among those who enlisted for three years 
at the commencement of the war, having joined the regular 
army of the United States as private, June 10, 1861. He was 
sworn in at the time of enlistment, and assigned to Co. D, Capt. 
Charles Griffin, of the Fifth Regiment of United States Artillery ; 
afterwards promoted corporal, and then sergeant, a position 
which is considered highly honorable in the regular army. 

He took an active part with the regiment at the battles 
of Yorktown, Hanover Court House, Antietam, Fredericks- 
burg, Chancellorsville, Gettysburg, Rappahannock Station, Mine 
Run, Wilderness, Laurel Hill, Spottsylvania Court House, Jeri- 
cho Mills, and Bethesda Church. 

By his purity of life, even temperament, and unostentatious 
manner, he endeared himself to a large circle of friends. Com- 
5^ 



4IO 



HJNGHAM IN THE CIVIL WAR. 



mander Rittenhouse of the Fifth United States Artillery wrote 
concerning his character as follows : " Serg. Michael Thompson 
is a good and honest soldier." 

At the expiration of his term of enlistment, June lo, 1864, he 
returned to Hingham, and obtained work with a former employer. 
His health and strength, however, had been given to his 
adopted country ; and in about two years he was stricken with 
the disease which terminated his existence. 

He died of consumption, at the residence of his parent^ in 
Hingham, Jan. 6, 1867, aged twenty-six years, nine months, and 
twenty-eight days. 

The Army and Navy Association of this town, in a series of 
resolutions adopted Jan. 12, 1867, speaks of him in terms nearly 
as follows : — 

Whereas, The death of Serg. Michael Thompson calls for 
some expression from this association for the loss of a worthy 
member, a faithful soldier, and an esteemed citizen, therefore, 

Resolved, That ... we will cherish in our hearts the memory 
of one whose life was the manifestation of those qualities that 
elevate and adorn human character. 



FRANK H. TILTON, 

Aged eighteen years. Accredited on the quota of Hingham, 
and mustered into the service Jan. 6, 1864, as private in Co. 
C, Fourth Regiment of Cavalry, M. V. 

He was one of the thirty-eight recruits obtained by the 
Citizens' Committee in January, 1864, and received State Aid 
from the town, in addition to the sum paid him as bounty 
money. 

Of the personal history of this soldier nothing is definitely 
known ; and but little can be said of his military record, except 
that he served several months with the Fourth Cavalry in the 
Department of the South, and died July 12, 1864, at Hilton 
Head, S.C. 

" That glowing land was but his sepulchre.'* 



IN ME MORI AM. ^i i 



THOMAS TINSLEY. 



Private in Co. K, First Regiment, M. V. I., died at Washington, 
D.C., May ii, 1863, from wo\inds received at the battle of 
Chancellorsville, Va., aged forty-one years, nine months. 

Thomas Tinsley was born at Foleshill, County of Warwick, 
England, Aug. 7, 1821. His parents were James and Hannah 
(Pickard) Tinsley. About the year 1847 he emigrated to the 
United States, and located in Hingham. Being a weaver by 
trade, he was employed for some time by the firm of Lincoln, 
Wilder, & Co. ; and afterwards, at the time of entering the ser- 
vice, by Messrs. Burr, Brown, & Co. 

July 9, 1862, he enlisted on the first quota of Hingham, under 
recruiting-officer Edward Cazneau, and was mustered Aug. 14, 
as private in Co. K of the First Regiment, M. V. I. 

While he was connected with the regiment, it took part in the 
battles of Kettle Run, Second Bull Run, Chantilly, Fredericks- 
burg, and Chancellorsville. In the last named battle, he received 
a gunshot wound in the right lung, and was conveyed to the 
Carver Hospital, at Washington, D.C., where he died. 

Private Tinsley was a brave and faithful soldier, a respected 
citizen, and a beloved husband and father. A diligent and 
accomplished student in the history of his own, he gave his life 
to enrich the page of his adopted country's history. 



ALVIN TOWER. 

Alvin Tower, youngest son of Asa and Ruth (Collier) Tower, 
was born in Cohasset, Sept. 13, 1832. 

In April, 1861, he enlisted as private in Co. I, Lincoln Light 
Infantry, Fourth Regiment, M. V. M., three months, and was 
one of the number who left Hingham on the afternoon of the 
17th for Boston, destined for Fortress Monroe. 

At the end of the term he returned to Hingham, and, after 
a brief vacation, entered the service for the second time on 



412 H INGHAM IN THE CIVIL WAR. 

the 27th of August, 1 861, as private in Co. A of the Twentieth 
Regiment, M. V. I., three years. 

On the 4th of September, he left Readville for the Depart- 
ment of Virginia, where, during the autumn and the following 
winter, which was spent at Camp Benton, near Poolesville, Md., 
he was employed as teamster and also as ambulance driver for 
the conveyance of the sick and wounded. Up to the close of 
May, 1862, his service in the ranks had been limited. On the 
1st of June, in the battle of Fair Oaks, he found himself face to 
face with the foe; and at the close of the day, just as the enemy's 
lines began to give way, received a wound in one of his legs, 
from a musket-ball, which proved mortal. 

His death took place June 8, 1862, at the General Hospital, 
Fortress Monroe ; and at this locality he was buried. 

Gen. Luther Stephenson states that he was the first Hingham 
soldier who died from the effects of wounds. 

Mr. Tower was temperate, moral, a good citizen, and faithful 
soldier, and served his country well in all the situations he was 
called to fill. 



ALBERT WILDER. 

Albert Wilder, born in Hingham, Feb. 28, 1842, was a son of 
Albert G. and Elizabeth W. (French) Wilder ; and a descend- 
ant from Edward Wilder, who in early life came to Hingham 
with his mother, and settled near Bull's Pond. 

Albert was a shoemaker. He enlisted for three years under 
recruiting-officer Edward Cazneau, at a time when the town was 
in need of men to fill its first quota, and was mustered into ser- 
vice Sept. 2, 1862, as private in Co. G of the Thirty-ninth Regi- 
ment, M. V. L 

Through the month of February, 1863, young Wilder was 
sick with fever, and confined in the hospital at Poolesville, Md. 

He afterwards shared in the general experience of the regi- 
ment until May 8, 1864, when, during a sharp engagement at 



IN MEMORIAM. 



413 



Laurel Hill, on Sunday morning, he was seriously wounded in 
his thigh. Every thing was done that could be to alleviate 
his sufferings, until he died at Harewood Hospital, Washington, 
D.C. 

One who was in the company with him says, Albert was a 
good comrade and soldier. 

" He went with his noble heart unworn. 
And pure and high ; 
A patriot stooping from the clouds of morn, 
Only to die." 

His remains were brought to Hingham for burial ; and, in the 
cemetery at Liberty Plain, a marble headstone has been erected, 
which bears the following inscription : — 

ALBERT WILDER 

Co. G. 

39TH REG. MASS. VOLS. 

DIED 

June, i, 1864. 

AGED 
22 YEARS 4 MONTHS. 

HE DIED AWAY FROM HOME AND FRIENDS, 

OUR LOVED ONE TRUE AND BRAVE; 
HE HAS FALLEN FOR HIS COUNTRY, 
AND HE FILLS A SOLDIER'S GRAVE. 



CHARLES EDWARD WILDER. 

Charles Edward Wilder, born in Hingham, August, 1832, was 
a son of Caleb and Lydia (Damon) Wilder. Early in 1864 he 
enlisted in the service of his country, and was mustered the 17th 
of February, as private in Co. E of the Thirty-second Regi- 
ment, M. V. I. In the disastrous battle of Laurel Hill, May 
12, 1864, private Wilder was wounded in the hand, while the 
regiment was" bravely advancing on the enemy's breastworks. 



414 



HINGHAM IN TBE CIVIL WAR. 



Shortly after he was attacked by a bronchial trouble, which ter- 
minated in consumption and death. At the first symptoms of 
his illness, he was sent to the hospital at Point Lookout, and 
early in November obtained leave of absence, and came to his 
home in Hingham. All efforts of medical skill, and all the 
tender assiduities of loving friends, proved ineffectual in arrest- 
ing the progress of the disease; and on the 23d of December, 
1864, he died in the full meridian of manhood, honored for his 
noble self-sacrifice, and mourned for his many virtues. He left 
a widow and one child. 



HORATIO PHILANDER WILLARD. 

Enlisted at Hingham, Oct. 25, 1861 ; mustered Nov. 28, 1861 ; 
and died at Alexandria, Va., Nov. 6, 1862. 

Horatio P. Willard was born at Ashburnham, Mass., Sept. 25, 
1 8 19. His parents were Philander Jacob and Hannah Parker 
(Snow) Willard. He was a harness-maker by trade ; and after 
removing to Hingham was in the employ of Mr. David A. Her- 
sey and others, until the outbreak of the war, when, on the 25th 
of October, 1861, he enlisted as private in Co. A of the Thirty- 
second Regiment, M. V. I., three years, and was mustered at 
Camp Dimmick on the 25th of the following November. His 
subsequent history is embraced in the trials and hardships early 
put upon the body of troops to which he belonged. Extended 
marches and continued exposure, however, soon b'foke down a 
somewhat enfeebled constitution ; and in August of the same 
year he was conveyed to the Fairfax Seminary Hospital at Alex- 
andria, Va., where, after eight or ten weeks, he died of chronic 
diarrhoea, Nov. 6, 1862, at forty-three years of age. 

In common with many who entered the service from Hingham 
in the autumn of 1861, Mr. Willard enlisted in the belief, that, 
beyond the discharge of garrison duty, no more arduous labor 
would be imposed. The perils of the hour made the call for 
additional forces imperative ; and the regiment quickly found its 
way to the front, with its full measure of dangers and fatigues. 



IN MEMORIAM. 



415 



The natural result followed. Many who would have proved 
efficient soldiers, and survived their term of enlistment, if con- 
fined to garrison duty, soon fell victims to disease and death 
under the trials of the battle-field. 

Just before leaving Fort Warren, the subject of this sketch 
remarked to a friend, that " all were willing, and even desired to 
be led to the front," adding, with a playful smile and in a signifi- 
cant undertone, " except one,'* 



DON PEDRO WILSON, 

The son of Cyrus and Mary Wilson, was born at Dracut, Mass., 
Aug. 26, 1821. Having received a common-school education, 
he studied dentistry, and commenced practice on Boylston 
Street, Boston, but in 1853 removed to Hingham. In August, 
1863, he was drafted, and sent to join Co. A of the Sixteenth 
Regiment, M. V. I. The printed report of the adjutant-general 
says of him : "Mustered Aug. 21, 1863. Prisoner Oct. 23, 
1863, and supposed died." 

In a letter written at Beverly Ford, Va., to one of his friends, 
he said that he was in the surgeon's department, and that his 
duty was to receive the medicine and to administer it. 

A relative writes, " All the information we have been able 
to obtain is, that he was reported missing on the retreat from 
Culpepper, Va., at Barstow Station ; and, being sick and unable to 
keep up, it is thought that he was taken prisoner and died 
before any information could be obtained in regard to him." 
. Such, in brief, is the history of one whom many of our people 
remember as a man highly skilled and respected in his profes- 
sion. 

He was a lover of rural occupations, and somewhat of an 
enthusiast in horticulture. Being compelled to leave his home 
and profession for the stern realities of war, and called so soon 
to sacrifice his life, his death seems doubly sad. He stood side 
by side with the volunteer, defended his country's laws, and for 
her gave his all. 



4l6 ff INGHAM IN THE CIVIL WAR. 

CONRAD p. YAGER. 

[Communicated.] 

Conrad P. Yager was born in Mergantheim in the kingdom of 
Wiirtemberg, about the year 1843. ^^ was a son of Conrad 
and Elenora Yager. After the death of his father, and when 
about ten years of age, he came with his mother to Hingham, 
and Hved with his stepfather, Mr. Samuel Sherman. 

Entering the West Grammar School as a pupil, his progress 
was quite remarkable ; for although at first he knew but few 
English words, yet in six months he was able to be classed with 
boys of his own age. He evinced in his recitations an under- 
standing of the subject matter studied which soon gave him 
high rank in the school. At fifteen years of age he left Hing- 
ham, and went to Newton Corner to learn the trade of a carver, 
and was subsequently in the employ of Dr. Lincoln of Boston. 

He enlisted into the United States service at Boston, in 1862, 
and was mustered in Co. F of the Second Regiment, Lincoln 
Guard, at Washmgton, D.C., in February, 1863. 

Shortly after the defeat of Gen. Pope, the regiment was or- 
dered out to protect the forts around Washington, when, in con- 
sequence of exposure, he contracted a severe cold, and was sent 
to the hospital. The severity of the attack, heightened probably 
by constitutional tendencies to consumption, soon led to a fatal 
result. He died the 15th of October, 1863, not having quite 
completed his twentieth year. 

He is remembered here as a lad of great promise, manly and 
courteous in his demeanor, possessing remarkable physical and 
intellectual vigor, and as one who, early consecrating himself to 
the service of his adopted country, sacrificed his life, and 



" Sank to rest 
By all his country's wishes blest." 



P. B. M. 



CHAPTER XIX. 

FURTHER ENLISTMENTS LIST OF BATTLES AND SKIRMISHES 

MENTIONED IN THE PRECEDING RECORDS SUMMARY. 

FURTHER ENLISTMENTS. 

THE names of the following persons were obtained while the 
volume was passing through the press, viz. : — 

ARTHUR BEAT. 

Born in Hingham, July 8, 1846. 

Enlisted for the quota of the town, and was mustered July 14, 
1864, as private in Co. A, Forty-second Regiment, M. V. I., 
one hundred days. Termination of service, Nov, 11, 1864. 

AUGUSTUS BOLLING. 
Age 24. 

Served for the quota of Hingham; mustered Oct. 11, 1862, as 
private in Co. C, Forty-second Regiment, M. V. M., nine 
months. Termination of service, Aug. 20, 1863. 

SWAN P. COLBERG. 

Age 28. 

Corporal in Co. C, Forty-second Regiment, M. V. M., nine 
months. Enlisted for the second quota of Hingham, and was 
mustered Oct. 11, 1862 ; mustered out Aug. 20, 1863. 



JAMES CORCORAN. 

Age 30. 

Private in Co. C, Forty-second Regiment, M. V. M., nine months. 



53 



41 8 HINGHAM IN THE CIVIL WAR. 

Enlisted for the second quota of the town, and was mustered 
Oct. II, 1862; mustered out Aug. 20, 1863. 



WILLIAM OTIS LINCOLN, Jun. 

Born in Hingham, April 20, 1838. 

Mustered Dec. 24, 1861, as commissary sergeant in Co. A of the 
First Regiment Cavalry, M. V., three years. Served in the 
Department of the South ; mustered out as regimental com- 
missary sergeant, April 10, 1862. 

PATRICK McCRANE. 

Age 44- 

Served for nine months on second quota of Hingham ; mustered 
Oct. II, 1862, as private in Co. C, Forty-second Regiment, 
M. V. M. ; mustered out Aug. 20, 1863. 

MICHAEL REARDON. 

Age 35. 

According to town documents, served on second quota of Hing- 
ham for nine months ; enrolled Oct. 11, 1862, as private in Co. 
C, Forty-second Regiment, M. V. M. ; termination of service, 
Aug. 20. 1863. 

WILLIAM RICH. 

Age 40. 

Occupation farmer. Enlisted under recruiting-officer Edward 
Cazneau for the first quota of Hingham, three years. Thirty- 
eighth Regiment, Co. I. ^ 

JOHN RYAN. 

Recruited for three years. Returned by the selectmen as serv- 
ing for the quota of Hingham. 



FURTHER ENLISTMENTS. 419 

WARREN R. SPURR. 

Age 32. 

Resided in Hingham, and enlisted for the quota of the town. . 
Mustered Dec. 30, 1863, as private in Co. A of the Third 
Heavy Artillery, M, V., three years. Service terminated 
Sept. 18, 1865. 



SUMMARY. 



Regular members and volunteers of the Lincoln Light 
Infantry who served at Fortress Monroe, not included 

in any quota 79 

Number of soldiers and sailors, natives of Hingham, 
who served in the war, including enlistments in other 

States 243 

Number of soldiers and sailors who served for the quota 

of Hingham ......••• 471 

It should be understood that many of our soldiers and sailors 
served upon more than one quota of the town. In some instan- 
ces, soldiers serving for short terms afterwards enlisted for three 
years. Others, at the expiration of their term of three years, or 
after being discharged for disability, re-enlisted upon new quotas, 
as required at the time. 

The aggregate of the enlistments from Hingham during 
the war, and not including the members of the Lin- 
coln Light Infantry, was 7^5 

Number of soldiers and sailors connected with Hing- 
ham who died prior to the erection of the Monument . 87 



420 HINGHAM lAT THE CIVIL WAR. 



LIST OF BATTLES AND SKIRMISHES 



MENTIONED IN THE PRECEDING RECORDS, WITH THE 

DATE OF OCCURRENCE. 



Aldie, Va., June 21, 1863, 
Alexandria, La., May 6-14, 1864. 
Antietam, Md., Sept. 17, 1862. 

Arrowfield Church (near Petersburg), Va., May 9, 1864. 
Atlanta, Ga., July 22, 1864; surrendered to Gen, 'Sherman's 
army, Sept. 2, 1864. 

Bachelder's Creek, N.C., Feb. i, 1864. 
Bailor's Farm, Va. (cavalry), June 15, 1864. 
Ball's Bluff, Va.. Oct 21, 186 1. 
Baton Rouge, La., Aug. 5, 1862. 
Bermuda Hundred, Va., attack at. May 16, 1864. 
Bethesda Church, Va., June 2, 3, 1864. 
Big Bethel, Va., June 10, 1861. 
Bisland, La., April 12, 13, 1863, 

Blackburn's Ford, Md. (sk.), July 18, 1861, and Sept. 20, 1862. 
, Blick's Station, Va. (see Weldon Railroad), Aug. 19, 1864. 
Blount's Creek, N.C., April 9, 1863, 
Blue Springs, Tenn., Oct. 10, 1863. 
Boonsboro', Md. 

Botler's Mill, Md. (see Shepardstown Ford), Sept. 20, 1862. 
Boykins Mills, S.C, April 18, 1865. 

Boydton Plank Road, Va., Oct. 27, 1864, and March 29, 1865. 
Brashear City, La., June 26, 1863. 
Bristoe's Station, Va, Oct. 14, 1863. 
Brock Pike, Va. (sk.), May 5, 1864. 
Bull Run, Va., first battle, July 21, 186 1. 
Bull Run, Va., second battle, Aug. 30, 1862. 
Buzzard's Roost (near Resaca, Ga.), evacuated May 10, 1864. 

Camden, N.C., April 19, 1862. 



LIST OF BATTLES AND SKIRMISHES. 



421 



Campbell's Station, Tenn., Nov. 16, 1863. 

Cane River, La., April 23, 1864. 

Carsville, Ga., May 15, 1864. 

Cedar Creek, Va., Oct. 13-19, 1864. 

Cedar Mountain, Va., Aug. 9, 1862. 

Chancellorsville, Va., May 1-4, 1863. 

Chantilly, Va., Sept. i, 1862. 

Charles City Court House, Va. (sk.), Dec. 13, 1863. 

Charles City Cross Roads, Va., June 30, 1862. 

Charleston, S.C., occupied by the national forces, Feb. 18, 1865. 

Chattanooga, Tenn., occ. by the national troops, Sept. 9, 1863 ; 

battle near, Nov. 22-25, 1863. 
Chickamauga, Tenn., Sept. 19, 1863. 
Cold Harbor, Va., June 1-3, 1864. 
Cove Creek, N.C. (sk.). May 22, 1863. 
Crampton's Pass, Md. (see South Mountain), Sept. 14, 1862. 

Dabney's Mills, Va., Feb. 6, 7, 1865. 

Dallas, Ga., May 28, 29, 1864. 

Darbytown Road (near Richmond), Va., Oct. 13, 1864, 

Deep Bottom, Va., July 27 and Aug. 15, 16, 1864. 

Donaldsonville, La., July 11-13, 1863. 

Drury's Bluff, Va., May 12-16, 1864. 

Duncan's Run, Va., March 25, 1865. 

Fair Oaks, Va., May 31, June i, 1862. 

Falling Waters, Va. 

Fisher's Hill, Va. Sept. 22, 1864. 

Five Forks, Va., April i, 1865. 

Fort Donnelson, Tenn., Feb. 16, 1862. 

Fort Mahone, Va., April 2, 1865. 

Fort Saunders, Tenn., Nov. 29, 1863. 

Fort Sedgwick (near Petersburg), Va., April 2, 1865. 

Fort Stedman (near Petersburg), Va., March 25, 1865. 

Fort Stevens, near Washington, D.C. (cav. sk.), July 11, 1864. 

Fort Sumter, S.C, attack on, April 12, 1861 ; surrendered to the 

national forces, Feb. 17, 1865. 
Fort Wagner, S.C, assault on, July 18, 1863. 



422 



HINGHAM IN THE CIVIL WAR. 



Four Mile Run (near Richmond), Va., Oct. 27, 1864. 
Fredericksburg, Va., Dec. 11-15, 1862. 
Front Royal, Va., May 23, 1862. 
Funkstovvn, Md. (sk.), July 12, 1863. 

Gaines' Mill, Va., June 27, 1862. 

Gainesville, Fla. (cav.), Aug. 17, 1864. 

Gainesville, Va., June 29, 1862. 

Gettysburg, Pa., July 2-3, 1863. 

Georgia Landing, October, 1862. 

Glendale, Va., June 29, 30, 1862. 

Goldsboro', N.C., Dec. 17, 1862. 

Goldsboro' Bridge, N.C. (sk.), Nov. 17, 1862. 

Gov. Moore's Plantation (near Alexandria), La., May 3, 1864. 

Gravelly Run, Va., March 31, 1865. 

Hampton Roads, Va., March 8, 9, 1862. 

Hanover Court House, Va., May 27, 1862. 

Hatcher's Run. Va., Feb. 5, 6, 1865. 

Hatteras Inlet, N.C, attack at, Aug. 27-29, 1861. 

Heckman's Farm, Va., May 6, 7, 1864. 

High Bridge, Va., April 6, 1865. 

Honey Hill, S.C, Nov. 30, and Dec. 10, 1864. 

Irish Bend, La., April 14, 1863. 

Jackson, Miss., siege of, July 11-16, 1863. 

Jacksonville, Fla., Feb. 5, 1864, , 

James Island, S.C, July 2-9, 1864. 

Jericho Ford, May 23, 1864. 

John's Island, S.C, July 2-9, 1864. 

Jones' Farm, Va. (see engagement at Pamunkey River). 

Kelley's Ford, Va., Nov. 7, 1863. 

Kenesaw Mountain, Tenn., June 16, 22, 27, 1864. 

Kettle Run, Va., Aug. 27, 1862. 

Kinston, N.C, Dec. 14, 1862, March 8-10, 1865. 

Knoxville, Tenn., siege of, Nov. 17 to Dec. 7, 1863. 

Rock's Plantation, La. (sk. near), July 12, 1863. 



LIST OF BATTLES AND SKIRMISHES. 



423 



Laurel Hill, Va., May 8 and 12, 1864. 

Laurenceburg, Ky. 

Lee's Mill, Va., April 16, 1862. 

Little Washington, N.C., Nov. 3, 1862, and siege of, April i- 

18, 1863. 
Locust Grove, Va., Nov. 27, 1863. 
Lookout Mountain, Tenn., Oct. 29, 1863. 

Malvern Hill, Va., July 1-3, 1862. 
Mansura, La., May 15, 16, 1864. 
Mechanicsville, Va. June 26, 1862. 
Mine Run, Va., Nov. 28-30, 1863, and Nov. 6, 1864. 
Missionary Ridge, Tenn., December, 1863. 
Mobile, Ala., occ. by Union troops, April 12, 1865. 
Morris Island, S.C., July 10, 1863. 

Murfreesboro,' Tenn., July 13, 1862, Jan. 1-3, 1863, and April 
13, 1863. 

NAVAL ENGAGEMENTS AND CAPTURES. 

I861. 

Aug. 28, Engagement at Hatteras Inlet, N.C. 

Sept. 22, Capture of Blockade-runner " Mary E. Pindar." 

Oct. 3, Capture of Schooner " Beverly." 

Oct. 20, Capture of Brig " Ariel." 

Nov. 12, Capture of Privateer "Beauregard." 

1862. 

March 8, Engagement at Sewall's Point. > 

March 8-9, Engagement with the ram " Merrimack " in 

Hampton Roads, and sinking of United States ships 

" Cumberland " and " Congress." 
April 18-24, Engagement and capture of Forts Jackson, St. 

Philip, and the Chalmette batteries. 
April 25, Engagement and capture of Forts Macon and 

Beaufort, N.C. 
April 26, Capture of Ship " Condor" and Barque " Glenn," 

blockade-runners. 



424 



HINGHAM IN THE CIVIL WAR. 

May I, New Orleans, La., captured. 

June 28, Engagement with the batteries at Vicksburg, Miss. 

July 15, Engagement with the Confederate Ram "Arkan- 
sas " and the Vicksburg batteries. 

Aug. 12-16, Engagement at Corpus Christi. Capture of 
Confederate armed Schooner " Breaker." 

Capture' of Steamer " Arizona," blockade-runner " Rein- 
deer," and Confederate Schooner " Montebello." 

1863. 

Jan, I, Engagement at Galveston, Texas, capture by the 
enemy of United States Steamer " Harriet Lane." and 
blowing up of the United States Steamer " Westfield " 
by her commander. 

Jan. io-i[, Engagement at Arkansas Post. 

March 28, United States Steamer " Diana " captured by 
the enemy. 

April 1-18, Attack at, and siege of Little Washington, N.C. 

April 15, Attack on West Point, Va. 

May 25 to July 8, The Navy co-operate with the army at 
the siege of Port Hudson. 

Dec. 25, Attack at Stono River, S.C. 

1864. 

Feb. I, United States Steamer "Underwriter" captured by 
the enemy. 

Feb. 1 1, Capture of Schooners " Louisa " and " Cosmopolite." 

July II, A second attack at Stono River, S.C. 

Aug. 5-8, Great Naval Engagement in Mobile Harbor ; sur- 
render of Forts Gaines and Powell, capture of the Con- 
federate Ram "Tennessee." and Steamer " Selma," 
and sinking of the Confederate Steamer " Gaines." 

Aug. 23, Fort Morgan, in Mobile Harbor, surrenders to 
Admiral Farragut. 

Nov. 12, Capture of the Forts at Plymouth, N.C. 

Dec. 23, Capture of blockade-runner "Julia." 



LIST OF BATTLES AND SKIRMISHES. 



425 



Nashville, Tenn., taken by the National troops ab. Feb. 24, 1862. 

(Battle near, Dec. 15, 16, 1864.) 
Natural Bridge (between St. Mark's and Tallahassee), Fla., March 

8, 1865. 
Newbern, N.C., March 14, 1862. 
New Hope Church, Ga., May 25, 1864. 
New Hope Church, Va., November, 1863. 
New Oak Church. 

Norfolk, Va., surrendered to the national forces. May 10, 1862. 
North Anna, Va., May 24, 1864. 

Olustee, Fla., Feb. 20, 1864. 
Opequan, Va., Sept. 19, 1864. 

Pamunkey River, Va., May 30, 1864. 

Peach Orchard (Savage Station), Va., June 29, 1862. 

Perryville, Ky., Oct. 8, 1862. 

Petersburg, Va., siege of, June 16, 1864, to April 2, 1865. 

Petersburg, Va., Mine Explosion, July 30, 1864. 

Pittsburg Landing, Tenn., April 7, 1862. 

Plains Store, La., May 21, 1863. 

Pleasant Hill (Red River), La., April 9, 10, 1864. 

Poolsville, Md. (cav. sk.), Sept. 5, 1862, and July 12, 1864. 

Poplar Spring (or Grove) Church, Va., Sept. 30, 1864. 

Po River, Va., May 10, 1864. 

Port Hudson, La., siege of. May 25, to July 8, 1863. 

Raleigh, N.C., occupied by Gen. Sherman, April 13-25, 1865. 

Rappahannock Station, Va., Nov. 7, 1863. 

Rawles Mills, N.C. (sk.), Nov. 2, 1862. 

Richmond, Va., occupied by the national troops under Gen. 

Weitzel, April 3, 1865. 
Roanoke Island, N.C, Feb. 7, 8, 1862. 
Robertson's Tavern, Va., Nov. 27, 1863. 
Rocky Face Ridge (See Dallas, Ga.). 

Sabine Cross Roads, La., April 8, 1864. 
Saunders House (Chancellorsville). 

54 



426 H INCH AM IN THE CIVIL WAR. 

Savage Station, Va., June 29, 1862, 

Shepardstown Ford, Va., Sept 20, 1862. 

Smitherick's Ford, N.C. (sk.), Nov. 2, 1862. 

Smithfield, Va., engagement at, April 14, 1864. 

South Anna Bridge, on the Pamunkey River, Va. (cav.), June 

26, 1863. 
South Mountain, Md., Sept. 14, 1862. 
South West Creek, N.C, March 7, 8, 1865. 
Springbank Bridge, N.C. (sk.), Dec. 17, 1863. 
Spottsylvania, Va., May 10, 12, and 18, 1864. 
St. Mary's Heights (Fredericksburg), Va., Dec. 13, 1862, and 

May 3, 1863. 
Stone River, Tenn., Jan. 2, 1863. 
Strawberry Plains, Va. (sk. near), Jan. 16, 1864. 
Sulphur Springs, Va. (cav.), Oct. 12, 1863. 
Surrender of Gen. Lee, and the Army of Northern Virginia, to 

Gen. Grant, April 9, 1865. 

Tallyhoma, Ga. 

Tolopotomy Swamp, Va., May 31, 1864. 

Trenton, N.C. 

Vaughan Road, Va., March 29, 1865. 

Vermilionville, La., Oct. 9, 1863. 

Vicksburg, Miss., siege of, June 17 to July 4, 1863. 

Wapping Heights, Va., July 24, 1863, 

Weldon Railroad, Va., Aug. 18-25, 1864. 

West Point, Va., May 7, 1862, and April 15, 1863. 

Wheatland, Va. 

Whitehall, N.C, Dec, 16, 1862. 

White House, Va. (sk.), June 28, 1862. 

White Oak Swamp, Va., June 30, 1862. 

Wilcox Bridge, N.C. (sk.), July 7, 1863. 

Wilderness, Va., May 5, 6, and 7, 1864. 

Williamsburg, Va., May 3-5, 1862. 

Williamsport, Md., evacuated, July 9, 1863. 



LIST OF BATTLES AND SKIRMISHES. 427 

Winchester, Va., at or near (cav.), March 23, and Dec. 3, 1862. 

June 13, 14, 1863, and Sept. 19, 1864. 
Winton, N.C. (sk.), July 27, 1863. 

Yellow Bayou (near Simmsport), La., May 18, 1864. 
Yorktown, Va., siege of, April 5 to May 3, 1862. 




APPENDIX. 



LIST OF PERSONS WHO CONTRIBUTED TOWARD THE 
ERECTION OF THE SOLDIERS' AND SAILORS' 
MONUMENT. ARRANGED BY FAMILIES. 
(See pp. 20 and 21.) 



Adams, Mrs. Ann Lizzie. 
Amedy, Mrs. Deborah T. 
Anderson, Alexander. 

Mrs. Alexander. 
Andrews, Benjamin. 

Mrs. Benjamin. 

Benjamin, jun. 

Emma B. 
Andrews, Lydia. 
Andrews, Catlierine A. 

Julia S. 
Andrews, Mrs. Thomas- 
Sarah L. 

Harriet F. 

Willie B. 

Mary E. 

Addie L. 

Bailey, Caleb. 

Mrs. Caleb. 
Bailey, George. 

Mrs. George. 

Fanny D. 

Addie M. 

Lizzie N, 
Baker, James L. 



Baker, Mrs. Lydia J. 
Sarah F. 
Mary S. 
Barnes, Adeline A. 
Barnes, Edwin. 

John C. 
Barnes, Elisha J., Boston. 

Mrs. Elisha J., Boston. 
Barnes, Henry. 

Carrie P. 

Howard C. 
Barnes, Isaac. 
Barnes, Kilburn. 

Susan. 
Barrett, Michael. 
Bassett, John. 

Mrs. John. 
Bassett, Daniel. 

Mrs. Daniel. 

D. Fletcher. 

Mary G. 

Wentworth A. 

Fannie W- 
Bassett, Caleb T. 
Bassett, George. 
Barstow, Samuel B. 



LIST OF CONTRIBUTORS. 



429 



Barstow, Mrs. Samuel B. 
Bartlett, Mrs. L. A. 
Edward W. 
Bates, Amos. 

Mrs. Amos. 
Bates, Amos B. 

Florence C. 
Battles, Otis L. 
Beal, Abner L. 
Beal, Caleb. 
Beal, Caleb G. 

Mrs. Caleb G. 
Beal, Carrie M. 
Rachel B. 
Beal, Elijah. 

Mrs. Elijah. 
Beal, Ella C, North Cohasset. 
Isadora, North Cohasset. 
Beal, Leavitt B. 

Mrs. Leavitt B. 
Oliver L. 
Henri L. F. 
Nettie F. 
Hubert. 
Beal, Louise R. 
Beal, Lizzie J. 
Beal, Lucy. 

Martha B. 
Beal, Wilbur F. 

Mrs. Wilbur F. 
Russell S. 
Wilbur, jun. 
Beal, William. 
Bicknell, Hannah. 
Quincy. 
Mrs. Ouincy. 
Lincoln B. 
Hannah O. 
Quincy, jun. 
Blossom, Thomas D. 

Mrs. Thomas D. 
Catharine W. 
Charles H. 
Blossom, Edward C. 

Mrs. Edward C. 



Brantley, Lorenzo, 
Breene, Mrs. Susan. 
John J. 
Joseph. 
David. 
Brett, Massena. 
Bronsdon, Samuel. 

Mrs. Samuel. 
Emma F. 
Lizzie B. 
Burbank, Samuel. 
Sarah B. 
Burr, Joseph C. 
Burr, Henry H. 

Anna E. 
Burr, Mrs. Mary. 

Mary W. 

Maria S. 
Burr, E. Waters. 

Mrs. E. Waters. 

William R. 

Henry W. 

Clarence S. 

Charles W. 

George W. 

Fannie H. 
Burr, Charles T. 

Mrs. Charles T. 

Arthur W. 

Minnie F. 
Burr, Fearing. 

Peter. 

Meriel. 

Margaret. 
Burr, Mrs. Emma. 

Caroline A. 

Ellen L. 
Burr, Brown, & Co. 
Burrell, Lemuel. 
Buttemore, Thomas. 
Buttemore, John. 



Cain, Daniel. 

Mrs. Daniel. 
Albion H. 



430 



HINGHAM JN THE CIVIL WAR. 



Cain, Lucy A. 
Cain, David. 

Mrs. David. 
David F. 
Cain, Leonard O. 
Casey, John, 
Casey, George M. 
Casey, Mary E. 
Casey, Catherine W. 
Cazneau, Mary B. 
Clark, Andrew J. 
Harry L, 
Mary W. 
George F. 
Clark, Ada A. 
Clarey, George C, jun. 

Mrs. George C, jun. 
Clement, James F. 

Mrs. James F. 
Cobb, David, jun. 
Cobb, Silas H. 
Cook, James B. 
Corbett, John M. 

Mrs. John M. 
Edith M. 
Corthell, Sarah A. 
Corthell, Loring. 

Mrs. Loring. 
Corthell, John K. 

Mrs. John K. 
John G. 
Henry R. 
Joseph. 
Mary R. 
Ella J. 
Charles L. 
Cowing, Edward. 
Crehan, Lawrence. 
Thomas L. 
Mary A. 
James. 
Crehan, Patrick. 
Crosby, Samuel T. 

Mrs. Samuel T. 
Ellen L. 



Crosby, Clara M. 

Samuel T., jun. 
Helen B. 
Cross, Moses. • 

Mrs. Moses. 
Walter L 
William Davis. 
Harry Francis. 
Edward Gorham 
Crowe, John. 

Mrs. John. 
Edmund T. 
Mary A. 
John, jun. 
William T. 
Gushing, David, 2d. 

Mrs. David, 2 . 
Elizabeth B. 
Sarah. 
Gushing, Leonard. 
Mary C. 
Gushing, Mrs. Almira. 
Gushing, Angelina H. 
Gushing, William. 
Gushing, Charles W. 

Mrs. Charles W. 
Charles O. 
Annie F. 
Virginia L. 
Gushing, Elpalet L. 

Mrs. Elpalet L. 
Edna L. 
Maud Wales. 
Gushing, David. 
Bella. 
Gushing, John. 

Mrs. John. 
Fannie O. 
Gushing, Loring H. 
Gushing, Alonzo. 

Mrs. Alonzo. 
Alonzo F. 
Lizzie H. 

Daley, John. 



LIST OF CONTRIBUTORS. 



431 



Damon, Catherine. 
Damon, Isaac N. 
Abbie H. 
F. M. 
Dana, Mrs. Lucy J. 
Davis, Mrs. Deborah. 
Davis, William. 
Dawes, John P. 
John G. 
Dawes, WilHam L. 
Dayton, Bela. 
Donnelly John A. 
Dow, Mrs. Susan P. 
Drew, Phineas. 
Dunbar, Andrew W. 

Mrs. Andrew W. 
Inez L. 
Dunn, Alexander. 

Mrs. Alexander. 
Mary E. 
Matthew W. 
Charles. 
Dupee, Lewis F. 

Easterbrook, Joseph. 

Lizzie W. 
Easterbrook, Samuel. 

Mrs. Samuel. 
Delia D. 
Edes, Robert T. 

Annie B. 
Eldredge, Eleanor W. 
Eldredge, John W. 

Mrs. John W. 
Bessie C. 

Farmer, Jedediah. 
Fearing, Albert. 

Mrs. Albert. 
Fearing, David, jun. 
Fearing, William, 2d. 

Mrs. William, 2d. 

Willie B. 

Alice L. 
Fearing, Abel. 



Fearing, Arthur S. 
Watson B. 
Clarkson T. 
Fearing, Mrs. Matilda. 

Leah L. 
Fearing, Mrs. Priscilla. 

Emily. 
Fearing, Perez L. 
Fee, Peter. 
Fee, James. 
Fee, John. 
Peter. 
Mary E. 
Fletcher, Henry L. 

Mrs. Henry L. 
Charles H. 
William O. 
Fiske, Mrs. Annie F. 

Sarah D. 
Foley, Cornelius. 
Catherine. 
Ellen. 
Mary. 
John. 

Cornelius, jun. 
French, Mary E. 
French, Lewis. 

Charles B. 
Edwin H. 
Carrie R. 
French, Lydia. 
Fuller, Tilson. 

Mrs. Tilson. 
S. Jenny. 
H. Adeline. 
Fuller, Mrs. John E. 

Gardner, Calvin. 

Isaac, 2d. 
Gardner, Tobias O. 

Mrs. Tobias O. 

Carrie O. 
Gardner,- Andrew J. 

Mrs. Andrew J. 

Lucy S. 



432 



HINGHAM IN THE CIVIL WAR. 



Gardner, Andrew W. 


Hersey, Rosella F. 


Mrs. Andrew W. 


-Hersey, Rachel. 


Albert S. 


Hannah. 


Mrs. Albert S. 


Hersey, Zadock. 


John H. 


Mrs. Zadock. 


Gardner, Isaac. 


Susan W, 


Gates, John D. 


Emma J. 


Mrs. John D. 


Hersey, Isaac L. 


Lizzie. 


Mrs. Isaac L. 


Gushing. 


Hersey, Samuel. 


Gill, Caleb. 


Hersey, Edmund. 


Mrs. Caleb. 


Mrs. Edmund. 


Gilman, William M. 


Fanny. 


Good, Charles E. 


Hersey, Gushing. 


Mrs. Charles E. 


Hersey, Franklin H. 


Goodrich, Hosah G. 


Hersey, Caleb S. 


Goodwin, Isaac F. 


Frances. 


Gorman, Michael, 


Hersey^ William H. 


Mrs. Michael. 


Hersey, Gridley F. 


Mary I. 


Hersey, Maria S. 


Michael F. 


Hersey, Warren A. 


William I. 


Mrs. Warren A. 


Gould, Lincoln. 


Hersey, George W. 


Graham, Mary E. 


Mrs. George W. 


Greely, William. 


Hersey, William, jun. 


Groce, Mary L. 


Leander C. T. 


, 


Hersey, Henry. 


Hall, Miss Mary. 


Hersey, Margaret. 


Halley, Patrick. 


Hersey, Francis H. 


Harding, David. 


Hersey, Henry M. 


Henry C. 


Hersey, George. 


Harlow, Jonathan E. 


Hersey, George, jun. 


Mrs. Jonathan E. 


Mrs. George, jun. 


Harris, Martha M. 


Walter W. 


Hawkes, James. 


Hersey, Edmund, 2d. 


Mrs. James. 


Mrs. Edmund, 2d 


Hersey, Albert F. 


Adelaide W. 


Mrs. Albert F. 


Howard P. 


Hersey, Henry F. 


Hicky, Daniel. 


Mrs. Henry F. 


Susan H. 


Ellen P. 


Hill, Daniel. 


Hersey, Ellen M. 


Hobart, Peter, jun. 


Hersey, Isaac. 


Hobart, Henry. 


Hersey, Edwin. 


Mrs. Henry. 


Hersey, Caleb. 


Hobart, Seth L. 



LIST OF CONTRIBUTORS. 



433 



Hobart, Mrs. Seth L, 
Ella M. 
Marion L. 
Mabel M. 
Hobart, Leavitt. 

Mrs. Leavitt. 
George. 
Frank. 
Hollis, John A. 
John C. 
Hough, George F. 
Charles G. 
Ellen A. 
Howard, Alfred. 

Hiram T. 
Howard, Waters. 

Mrs. Waters. 
Sarah A. 
Elizabeth. 
Howard, Charles. 
Hudson, William. 
Hudson, Eben H. 
Hull, Thomas. 
Humphrey, Mrs. Edwin. 
Mary C. 
Eddie D, 
Humphrey, Leavitt. 
Humphrey, Davis. 
Humphrey, Marcellus. 
Amos C. 
Frederick. 
Humphrey, Thomas C. 
Humphrey, Charles. 
Hunt, George. 

Mrs. George. 
Hunt, Caleb S. 
Hunt, James L. 
Hyland, Mrs. Chloe S. 

Jacob, Joseph. 

Mrs. Joseph. 

Sarah C. 

Frederick S. 
Jacob, Joshua. 
Jeffries, Mary T. 

55 



Jerald, Ora F. 

Mrs. Ora F. 
Jernegan, William H. 

Mrs. William H. 
Lottie W. 
Jones, William. 
Jones, Gardner H. 
Jones, Mrs. Moses. 
Jones, Henry W. 
Jones, Seaver. 

Mrs. Seaver. 
Jones, Grace A. 

Lizzie M. 
Jones, Henry. 

Mrs. Henry. 

Kahher, Ellen. 
Kelsey, William P. 
John B. 
James M. 
Kent, Maurice. 

Mrs. Maurice. 
Mary. 
John. 
Ellen. 
Honora. 
Keshan, Mrs. John. 

Catherine T. 
Helen M. 
Anna M. 
Elizabeth J. 
John H. 
King, George W. 

James S. 
Kitterell, Jane A. 
Charles. 

Lane, Rufus. 

Mrs. Rufus. 

Rufus A. 

Carrie L. 
Lane, Mrs. Elizabeth. 
Lane, Leavitt. 
Lane, Morallus. 
Xane, Ruth B. 



434 



HINGHAM IN THE CIVIL WAR. 



Lane, Charles. 
Leavitt, Abner L. 

Abner L., jun. 

William H. 
Leavitt, Mrs. Almira. 

Sarah. 
Leavitt, Elijah. 
Leavitt, Thomas J. 

Mrs. Thomas J. 

Charles Thomas. 

Lilla M. 
Le Baron, Russell. 
Lewis, Mrs. Joanna K. 
Lewis, James S. 

Mrs. James S. 
John B. 
Lincoln, Bela. 

Mrs. Bela. 

Abby A. 

Bela F. 
Lincoln, Calvin. 

Lydia L. 

Laurinda. 
Lincoln, Calvin A. 

Mrs. Calvin A. 
Lincoln, Charles, jun. 

Mrs. Charles, jun. 
Lincoln, Charlotte C. 
Lincoln, Charlotte L. 
Lincoln, David. 

Mrs. David. 
Lincoln, E. 
Lincoln, George. 

Mrs. George. 

George M. 

Mercy W. 

Herman. 

Sarah J. 

Helen S. 

Alfred L. 
Lincoln, Miss C. K. T. 
Lincoln, Henry W. 

Henry W., jun. 

LiUie A. 
Lincoln, Jairus B. 



Lincoln, Mrs. Jairus B. 
Lincoln, Joanna. 

Lucinda. 
Lincoln, Mrs. Luther B. 
Lincoln, Mrs. Marshal. 
Lincoln, Mary C. 

Maria S. 

Ann S. 
Lincoln, Mrs. Phoebe. 
Lincoln, Robert W. 

Mrs. Robert W. 

Robert W., jun. 

William C. 

Marshal. 

James L. 
Lincoln, Solomon. 

Mrs. Solomon. 

Solomon, jun. 

Arthur. 

Francis Henry. 
Lincoln, Mrs. Susan N. 

George B. 

Frank R. 

Lydia W. 

Helen A. 
Lincoln, Thomas H. 

Sarah F. 

Meriel F. 
Lincoln, William O. 

Mary. 
Litchfield, Franklin. 
Loring, Albert B. 

Mrs. Albert B. 

Abner. 

Abbie W. 
Loring, Alfred. 

Mrs. Alfred. 
Loring, Mrs. Amelia B. 
Loring, Enos. 

Ida W. 
E. Bradley. 
George A. 
Hattie A. 
Loring, Isaiah W. 
Loring, Mrs. Isaiah W. 



LIST OF CONTRIBUTORS. 



435 



Loring, Ida M. 


Meade, Francis K. 


Francis W. 


Mrs. Francis K. 


Joseph J. 


Merritt, Henry L. 


Jennie R. 


Merritt, Henry, jun. 


Sarah J. 


Mrs. Henry, jun. 


Loring, Zenas. 


Merritt, Paul B. 


Lovett, John 0. 


Meservey, Benjamin F. 


Mrs. John O. 


Mrs. Benjamin F, 


Mary E. 


Manley, C. 


Sarah F. 


B. W. 


John 0., jun. 


Miller, Fred H. 


Charles A. 


Miller, Ellen C. 




Moffitt, John. 


McCarty, Catherine G. 


Murphy, Jeremiah, jun. 


Catherine A. 


Murphy, Mary E. 


Mary E. 


Muzzy, Julia A. 


McDonough, Miss Carohne. 




McNiel, Sarah. 


Nash, Reuben H. 


Hannah. 


Frank W. 


Peter, 


Ellen M. 


McKee, Mrs. Mary. 


Nelson, Mrs. James. 


Mahoney, Helen. 


Nelson, William J. 


Maggie. 


Mrs. William J. 


Marble, Demerick. 


Lois A. 


Mrs. Demerick. 


Lizzie P. 


Arthur D. 


Harry B. 


Charles H. 


Wilhe B. 


Margett, Thomas. 


Nelson, William T. 


Marsh, Caleb. 


Newhall, Joseph A. 


Mrs. Caleb. 


Mrs. Joseph A. 


George S. 


Nichols, Mrs. Alfred. 


Lizzie M. 


Nichols, George W. 


Fred. 


Mrs. George W. . 


Marsh, Charles N. 


Noyes, Joseph W. 


Mrs. Charles N. 


Nye, Atkinson. 


Ellen Billings. 


Fanny L. 


Ebed Hersey. 


William A. 


Marsh, Lydia L. 


Nye, Henry. 


Marsh, Samuel W. 


. . Mrs. Henry. 


Marsh, Sarah L. 


John H. 


Helen M. 


Mary E, 


Matthews, Henry A. 


Sarah. 


Maxim, Mrs. Lydia. 


Nye, Lucy. 


May, Hattie E. 


Nye, J. Sturgis.* 


May, Henry G. 


O'Keefe, Patrick. 



436 



HINGHAM IN THE CIVIL WAR. 



O'Keefe, Mrs. Patrick. 

Kate. 

Margaret. 

Caroline. 

Ellen M. 
Osborn, Henry. 

Mrs. Henry. 
Overton, Sarah E. 

Palmer, Elizabeth B. 
Palmer, Lydia B. 

Sarah A. 
Park, Mary. 
Parker, Benjamin. 

Mrs. Benjamin. 

Benjamin R. 

E. A. 
Peare, Horace. 
Peirce, Mrs. John W. 
Perry, Seth W. 
Poole, Joseph M. 
Pyne, John. 

John W. 
David W. 

Rafferty, John. 
Reed, Horace F. 

Mrs. Horace F. 
Remington, Bela C. 
Remington, Hosea S. 
Remington, John O. 

Mrs. John O. 
Otis L. 
Remington, W. T. 
Rich, B. W. 
Rich, Alexander G. 
Richards, I. D. 
Riley, William. 
Ripley, Mrs. Eben C. 

Charles H. 
Ripley, George R. 
Ripley, Levi B. 
Ripley, Joseph. 

Mrs. Joseph. 



Schmidt, Charles. 
Seymour, Charles W. 

Mrs. Charles W. 
Mehitable W. 
Martha W. 
Seymour, Charles W. S. 

Mrs. Charles W. S. 
Harriet L. 
Hubert. 
Sherman, Samuel, 
Shuck, Frederick. 
James B. 
Shute, Elijah. 

Mrs. Elijah. 
Walter C. 
Shute, Henry. 

Abigail B. 
Henry Leonard. 
Siders, Henry. 

Mrs. Henry. 
Henry Francis. 
Sarah Davis. 
Elizabeth Blake. 
Siders, John, 

Mrs. John. 
Simmons, Samuel. 
Snell, John E. 
Snell, Thomas. 
Snell, Margaret. 
Spaulding, Henry E. 
Spear, Sarah L. 
Adda F. 
Henry E. 
Spencer, David. 

Mrs. David. 
Spooner, George H. 
Spooner, Leonore. 
Sprague, Daniel W. 
Sprague, Joseph. 

Mrs. Joseph. 
Thomas Loring. 
Joseph Sumner. 
Mary Eliza. 
Sprague, Joseph C. 



LIST OF CONTRIBUTORS. 



437 



Sprague, Joseph T. 
Sprague, Josiah. 

Freddie L. 
Sprague, Leavitt, 2d. 
Sprague, Peter N. 

Mrs. Peter N. 
Martha L. 
Sprague, Widow Peter, 
Sprague, Sally. 
Sprague, Sidney W. 
Sprague, Samuel. 
Sprague, Sidney. 

Mrs. Sidney. 
Sprague, William B. 
Spring, Charles. 

Mrs. Charles. 
Charles L. 
Lizzie H. 
Frederic W. 
Stearns, Ella L. 

George W. 
Stephenson, Ezra. 

Mrs. Ezra. 
William L. 
Ezra T. C. 
Levi T. 
Stephenson, Henry. 
Stephenson, John. 

Mrs. John. 
Susan A. 
Stockwell, Otis. 

Mrs. Otis. 
Stodder, Caleb S, 
Stodder, C. H. F. 
Stodder, John P. 
Stodder, Martin. 
Stodder, Martin L. 
Stodder, Martin T. 
Stodder, Mrs. R. L. 
Stodder, Thomas. 
Stodder, William T. 
Mary C. 
Albion T. 
Stodder, William D. 
Henry L. 



Southworth, Temperance. 
Stowell, Hersey. 

Francis H. 

Martha. 

Helen M. 
Stowell, Jared. 

Alice. 

Taylor, A. C. 

Myra F. 
Taylor, William. 

George H. 
Thaxter, Mrs. Joseph B., sen. 

Lucy B. 

David. 
Thaxter, Joseph B. 

Mrs. Joseph B. 

Joseph B., jun. 
Thaxter, Anna Q. 

Catherine K. 

Elizabeth K. 
Thaxter, Norton O. 
Thayer, Albert E. 

Mrs. Albert E. 
Edward W. 
Thayer, Elihu. 

Mrs. Elihu. 
Charles M. 
Thayer, Mrs. Jairus. 
Thayer, Joshua. 
Thomas, Mrs. David. 
Thomas, Joseph. 

Mrs. Joseph. 

Fred W.^^ 

Thomas, Reuben. 

Mrs. Reuben. 
Thomas, William. 

Mrs. William. 
Thomas, William Henry. 

Mrs. William Henry. 

Widow Sally L. 
Thompson, Catherine E. 
Thompson, Domick. 
Tilden, Elijah D. 

Mrs. Elijah D. 



438 



HINGHAM IN THE CIVIL WAR. 



Tilden, Helen D. 
Mary E. 
Tilson, Jonathan. 

Mrs. Jonathan. 
Tinsley, Mrs. Hannah. 
Teresa. 
Jane. 
Mary A. 
Tirrell, Sarah B. 
Todd, John. 

Mrs. John. 
Oliver. 
TuUey, Hubert J. 

Mrs. Hubert J. 
James W. 
John W. 

Urie, John. 

Mary L. 
John F. 
George W. 
Robert. 

Wade, John E. 
Waters, George H. 
Waters, John. 

Mrs. John. 
Welch, John F. 
Welch, John. 
White, James P. 

Edward J. 
Whiting, Amasa. 

Mrs. Amasa. 

Amasa J. 

Ada B. 

Widow Catherine B. 
Whitney, George F. 

Mrs. George F. 

George E. 
Whitney, Jason W. 

Mrs. Jason W. 

Everett E. 

Edward C. 

William C. 
Whiton, Albert. 

Mrs. Albert. 

Albert H. 



Whiton, Effie A. 

Eliza P. 
Whiton, Bela. 
Whiton, Adeline. 
Whiton, Elijah L. 

Mrs. Elijah L. 

Dexter B. 

Mary L. 
Whiton, Mary R. 
Whiton, Thomas F. 

Mrs. Thomas F. 

Morris F. 
Whiton, Royal. 

Sarah A. 
Whiton, William. 

Fannie. 

Laura. 

Charles F. 
Whittier, Mary A. 
Wilder, Alden. 
Wilder, Charlotte S. 
Wilder, Edwin. 
Osgood. 
Wilder, Fdwin, 2d. 

Mrs. Edwin, 2d. 

Olive A. 

Edwin M. 
Wilder, Elizabeth. 
Wilder, Frederick S. 
Wilder, Frederick. 
Wilder, George. 
Wilder, Henry. 

Isaac H. 
James H. 
Wilder, Joseph H. 
Wilder, Joseph. 
Wilder, Martin. 
Wilder, Nathaniel. 
Wilder, William W. 

Lizzie May. 

Cordelia A. 
Winslow, Isaac. 
Woodward, Joseph. 
Wolfe, David. 
Henry. 
Wright, George. 



OMISSION. — ERR A TA. 439 



OMISSION. 
CHARLES HAYWARD BAILEY. 

Born in Hingham, May i, 1842. 

Enlisted at Boston, Sept. 4, 1862, as private in Co. A, Forty- 
fourth Regiment, M. V. I., nine months. 

Served in the Department of North Carolina, and was present 
in the engagements at Rawle's Mill, Kinston, Whitehall, and 
Goldsboro'. 

Returned with the regiment, and was mustered out at Read- 
ville, Mass., June 18, 1863, by reason of expiration of term of 
service. 



ERRATA. 

Page 213. — For Hiram Newcomb, read ll\r^.m Newcomb, 2d. 

Page 223. — For James A. Wade, r^a^ James H. Wade. 

Page 228. — For Eleazer Chubbuck, read Eleazer Chubbuck, jun. 

Page 287.— For Caleb Gill, read Cdl&h Bemis Gill. 

Page 311. — For Robert Francis Hardy, readRoheri Francis Fardy. 

Page 322. — For Perez L. Fearing, jun., read Perez Francis Fearing. 



INDEX, 



GENERAL INDEX. 



[For Index to Names of Soldiers and Sailors, see Page 449.] 



A. 

Action of the town in relation to a Sol- 
diers' and Sailors' Monument, 38, 45. 
Act of Congress concerning enlistments, 

79- 
Address by Hon. Solomon Lincoln, 33- 

41. 

Address, editorial, 7. 

Agreement between the Soldiers' and 

Sailors' Monument Committee and 

the Proprietors of Hingham Cemetery, 

21, 22, 54. 
Aid to drafted men, 69, 73. 

To the families of volunteers, 63, 69. 
Aid from the State, 41, 63, 69, 73, 76. 
Amount of money subscribed by citizens 

toward the erection of the Monument, 

58. 
Andrew, John A., 46, 70, biographical 

sketch of, 317. 
Appendix, 429. 
Appropriation for a Soldiers' and Sailors' 

Monument, 45. 
Appropriations for State and Town aid, 

6r, 63, 69, JT,, 74> 76. 
Arrival in Hingham of the re-enlisted 

men of the Thirtv-second Regiment, 

185. 
Artillery regiments and batteries, 131, 

136, 248, 249, 256, 257, 258. 
Assembling of loyal governors, 319. 

B 

Baltimore, Md., attack at, April 19, 1861, 
142, 150, 318, 367. 



Batteries of light artillery : 

First (3 years), 256. 

Third (3 years), 257. 

Tenth (3 years), 258. 

Eleventh (9 months), 131. 
Battles and skirmishes, list of, 421-42S. 
Battle of Laurel Hill, Va., sketch of, 

186. 
Bells rung for a war-meeting, 72. 
Biographical sketches, 317. 
Bounty to volunteers, 63-68. 
Burr, Fearing, 3, 10, 12. 



Calamity, the great national, 77. 

Calls for volunteers, 37, iii, 116, 140, 
141. 

Camp Dimmick, Hingham, recruiting at, 
184. 

Cavalry regiments, 259, 261. 

Charleston, S.C., first Union troops en- 
tering, 240. 

Citizens' recruiting committees, 71, 72, 

73> 84, 85. 
Citizens' subscriptions, 58, 72. 
Citizens' meetings, 60-75. 
Coast defence, enlistments for, 75, 249. 
'Collations, 68, 108. 
Color-bearers, 150, 189, 197, 221, 264, 

339- 
Committees chosen, 64, 71, 73, 74, 75, 77, 

109. 
Commutation, list of persons paying, 82, 

Receipts from, 83. 
Committee on publication, choice of, 3. 



444 



n INGHAM IN THE CIVIL WAR. 



Contents, 13, 16. 

Contents of a box placed under the Sol- 
diers' and Sailors' Monument, 56. 
Cost of the Monument, 58. 
Cruel treatment of prisoners, 152, 231. 

D. 

Death of Abraham Lincoln, 77. 

Decorating the graves of the dead, 40. 

Dedication, 5. 

Dedication of the Soldiers' and Sailors' 
Monument, 23 to 49. Chief marshal's 
notice, 23. Military pageant, 27. Pro- 
cession, order of, 23. Address by 
Hon. Solomon Lincoln at Agricultural 
Hall, 31. Exercises at Hingham Cem- 
etery, 43. Unveiling the Monument, 
45. Remarks by Hon. Albert Fearing, 
president of the day, 43. Remarks by 
John Cushing, in behalf of the Monu- 
ment Committee, 45. Remarks by 
Henry Siders, Esq., Chairman of Se- 
lectmen, 47. Original odes, 28, 42, 44, 
48. Minute guns fired from Ward 
Hill, 45- 

Dedicatory exercises, publishing of, 57. 

Departure of the Lincoln Light Infantry 
for the seat of war, 97. 

Draft and substitutes, 79-87. 

Drafted men, 81, 207, 396. List of per- 
sons drawn, 80, 81. Notes relating to, 
82,83, 116. 

Draftriot in Boston, 126, 250. 



Editorial, Fearing Burr, George Lincoln, 

7- 
Enlistments, act of Congress relating 
to,^ 79. P^or different regiments and 
periods of service, 112, 115, 116, 184, 
185, 271, 278. For coast defence, 75, 
249. Additional, 270, 417. Meetings 
to encourage, 65, 66. Expiration of 
three years', 1 1 1. In other States, 284, 

295- 
Enrolling officer, appointment of, 80. 

Errata, 440. 

Escape from imprisonment, 227. 

Exemptions, relating to, 85. 



Exempts, company of, 68. 

Expense of dedicating the Monument, 

F. 

First Battalion, M. V., 175. 

Final Report of the Monument Com- 
mittee, 54. 

Financial statement of the Monument 
Committee, 58. 

Frontier service, 262. 

Funeral ceremonies on the death of 
Abraham Lincoln, 78. 

G. 

General Lee surrenders the Army of 
Northern Virginia to the National 
forces under General Grant, 264. 

Generous acts, 58, 67, 73. 

Grand military review at Washington, 
D.C. (May 23, 1865), 132, 225, 245. 

H. 

Hingham Cemetery, agreement between 
the proprietors, and committee on Sol- 
diers' and Sailors' Monument, 21, 22, 

54- 
Hingham quotas, 84, 85, 116. 
Historical sketch of the Lincoln Light 

Infantry, 109 
Home Guards, parade of, 68. 

I. 

Increase of bounty to volunteers, 65, 66. 
Indenture, 21, 22. 

Inscriptions upon the Soldiers' and Sail- 
ors' Monument, 50-53. 
In memoriam, 315. 

L. 

Ladies' meetings to encourage enlist- 
ments, 65, 66. To prepare garments 
for the soldiers, 61. 

Ladies meet on Sunday to furnish hos- 
pital supplies, 67. 

Laurel Hill, Va., sketch of the battle of, 
186. 

Letter from Governor Andrew, 70. 

Liberality of the citizens, 58, 67, 72, 73. 

Lincoln, Abraham, biographical sketch. 



GENERAL INDEX. 



445 



of, 89-94. Death and funeral cere- 
monies of, 7S. 

Lincoln, Arthur, sketch of Abraham 
Lincoln, S9-94. 

Lincoln, George, 3, 10, 12. 

Lincoln Light Infantry, 60-1 10. Depart- 
ure for Fortress Monroe, 97. Relief 
for the families of, 60. Public recep- 
tion of, on its return, with the remarks 
of Henry E. Hersey, Esq., and Capt. 
Luther Stephenson, jun., 62, 104, io6- 
Historical sketch of, 109, no. Regu- 
lar members and volunteers of, 98-101. 

Lincoln, Solomon, address by, 33-41- 

List of battles and skirmishes, 421-428. 

List of persons who contributed towards 
the erection of the Monument, 428- 
438. Of three months' men, 9S-101. 
Of one hundred days' men, 115. Of 
nine months' men, 131. Of one-year 
men, 139. Of men in cavalry service, 
270. \\\ regiments of artillery and in 
batteries, 258. Of additional enlist- 
ments, 277, 278. Of men in the regu- 
lar army and veteran reserve corps, 
283. Of natives or residents of Hing- 
ham enlisted in other States, 295. Of 
men in the navy, 314. 

Location of the Monument, reasons for 
choice of, 46, 54, 55. 

Long, John D., sketch of John A. An- 
drew, 317. 

M. 

Meetings of citizens liable to draft, 70, 

71. 73.75- 
Meetings held by the ladies to make 

garments and to furnish hospital sup- 
plies for the soldiers, 61, 67. 
Meetings of the Soldiers' and Sailors' 

Monument Committee, 46, 54, 59. 
Members of the Lincoln Light Infantry, 

9S-101. 
Military company formed in Hingham 

by act of legislature, 76. 
Money contributed toward enlistments, 

to be. refunded, 74. 
Monument, Soldiers' and Sailors', 19- 

59- 



Musicians in the war who were connected 
with Hingham, 98, 148, 162, 164, 171, 
172, 203, 220, 242, 246, 259, 265, 357. 

N. 

Natives of Hingham, Mass., serving 
from other States, 284-295. 

Naval records, engagements, and cap- 
tures, 296-312. 

Negro regiments, formation of, 319. 

Nine months' nien, number required 
from Massachusetts, Ii6, 117. Quota 
for Hingham, 116. List of persons 

■ connected with Hingham serving this 

. term, 131. 

Number of Union soldiers called into 
service, 37. Number who died from 
disease, were killed or mortally 
wounded, 37. 

Number of Confederate soldiers who 
lost their lives in the war, 37. 

Number of Hingham soldiers and sail- 
ors who were slain, or died from dis- 
ease, during the war, 419. 

O. 
Obituary notices, 317. 
Omission, 440. 

One hundred days' men, 111-115. Num- 
ber furnished by Massachusetts, in. 
One year's men, 132-139. 



Post 104, G. A. R., 58, 330. 

Prefatory, 7. 

Prisoners, our men taken, 152, 153, 180, 
193, 227, 231, 264, 266, 286, 288, 292, 
300, 304, 323, 332, 334, 346, 349, 391, 
401, 415. 

Prisons, description of the noted to- 
bacco warehouse, 180. 

Prison cruelties, 231; rations, iSo, 231, 
264; buildings, iSo. 

Proceedings of town and citizens' meet- 
ings, 60-7S. 

Public reception of the Lincoln Light 
Infantry on returning from Fortress 
Monroe, 62-106. 

Publishing Committee, choice of, 3. 



446 



HINGHAM IN THE CIVIL WAR. 



R. 



Rallying Committees chosen, 70, 72. 
Reception of the Lincoln Light Infantry 

on its return from Fortress Monroe, 

62-104. 
Recommendations of the Soldiers' and 

Sailors' Monument Committee, 57. 
Recruiting officers in Hingham, 84, 85, 

132, 184, 185, 250, 351, 393. 
Recruiting for coast defence, 75. 
Recruiting, superintendent of, for Ply- 
mouth County, 244. 
Recruits from Middleborough, Ply- 
mouth, and Quincy, 116. 
Re-enlistments in the Thirty-second 

Regiment, 83, 84, 185. 
Regiments of Artillery: 

First Heavy (3 years), 248. 

Third do. (3 years), 249. 

Fourth do. (i year), 136. 
Regiments of Cavalry : 

First (3 years), 259. 

Second (3 years), 259. 

Fourth (3 years), 261. 

Fifth, colored (3 years), 269. 
Regiments of Infantry : 

First (3 years), 142. 

Second (3 years), 144. 

Fourth (3 months), 99, (9 months), 117. 

Fifth (100 days), 112; (9 months), 119. 

Sixth (9 months), 120. 

Seventh (3 years), 144. 

Ninth (3 years), 146. 

Eleventh (3 years), 148. 

Twelfth (3 years), 1 50. 

Thirteenth (3 years), 152. 

Fourteenth, afterwards First Heavy | 
Artillery (3 years), 153. 

Fifteenth (3 years), 153. 

Sixteenth (3 years), 154. 

Seventeenth (3 years), 156. 

Eighteenth (3 years), 157. 

Nineteenth (3 years), 162. 

Twentieth (3 years), 164. 

Twenty-first (3 years), 165 

Twenty-second (3 years), 166. 

Twenty-third (3 years), 167. 

Twenty -fourth (3 years), 170. 



Regiments of Infantry : 

Twenty-sixth (3 years), 173. 

Twenty-eighth (3 years), 174. 

Twenty-ninth (3 years), 175. 

Thirtieth (3 years), 180. 

Thirty-first (3 years), 183. 

Thirty-second (3 years), 184. 

Thirty-fifth (3 years), 219. 

Thirty-eighth (3 years), 222. 

Thirty-ninth (3 years), 225. 

Fortieth (3 years), 236. 

Forty-second (100 days), 113. 

Forty-third (9 months), 121. 

Forty-fourth (9 months), 125. 

Forty-fifth (9 months), 127. 

Fiftieth (9 months), 130. 

Fifty-fourth, colored (3 years), 237. 

Fifty-fifth, colored {3 years), 239. 

Fifty-sixth (3 years), 241. 

Fifty-seventh (3 years), 242. 

Fifty-eighth (3 years), 243. 

Fifty-ninth (3 years), 246. 

Sixtieth (100 days), 115. 

Sixtieth-first (i year), 132. 

Sixty-second (i year), 132. 
Regimental colors saved from capture, 

264. 
Regular army, service in, 2S2, 2S3. 
Report (final) of the Soldiers' and Sail- 
ors' Monument Committee, 54. 
Reports of Citizens' Recruiting Commit- 
tees, 72, 75. 
Review, grand military, at Washington, 

D.C. (May 23, 1865), 132, 225, 245. 
School for negro children at Port Royal, 

S.C, 344. 
Second Battalion Infantry, M. V., 108. 
Sherman's army, Mass. regiments in, 

144. 
Soldiers and sailors, number called for 

by the government during the war, 37, 

III, 116, 140, 141. Number furnished 

by the town of Hingham, 85, 419. 
Soldiers and sailors who were killed in 

battle, 323, 324, 329, 330, 333, 339, 

356. 364, 365- 367. 369. 402, 405. 407, 
40S. Who died from wounds, 335, 

yJ>^ 339. 343. 345. 346, 348, 349. 356. 
359. 360, 367. 369. 370. 371. 375. 37S. 



GENERAL INDEX. 



447 



384, 3S9, 393, 402, 405, 411, 412. 

Who died from disease during the 
war, 321, 325, 327, 331, 332, 334, 335, 

Zn^ 340. 342, 345. 347, 35i> 353, 354, 
362, 363, 373, 380, 381, 383, 388, 390, 
392, 394, 396, 396, 397, 39S, 400, 403, 
406, 410, 413, 414, 416 Who died 
during the war from causes unknown, 
415. Who died after the war and 
prior to the erection of the Monu- 
ment, 328, 356, 358, 361, 363, 376, 
377, 379, 392, 395, 409- ^Vho have 
died since the erection of the Monu- 
ment, 124, 126, 127,137, 148, 149, 150, 
152, 183, 330, 398. Who died from ac- 
cidental injuries during the war, 382, 
383, 386. Who died in rebel prisons, 
332, 334, 349, 391, 401. Whose re- 
mains are buried in Hingham, 45, 47, 
322, 325, 330, 331, 332, 337, 339, 345, 

351, 367, 373. 3S6, 389, 394. Who 
were prisoners, 152, 153, iSo, 193, 
227, 231, 264, 266, 286, 28S, 292, 300, 
304, 323, 332, 334, 346, 349, 391, 401, 

415- 
Soldiers' and Sailors' Monument, action 

of the town relating to, 38, 43. Pro- 
portions and description of, 49. Care 
of the grounds surrounding it, 47. 

Soldiers' and Sailors' Monument Com- 
mittee, 59. Recommendations of, 57. 
Financial statement of, 58. Final 
report of, 54. 

State aid, 41, 63, 69, 73, 76. 

Subscriptions in aid of recruiting, 58, 70, 

75- 
Substitutes, relating to, 75, 76, 85, 86. 

Summary, 419. 



Surrender of Gen. Lee's Army (April 9, 
1865) to the national forces under 
Gen. Grant, 264. 

T. 
Telegram from Gov, Andrew, 97. 
Three years' men, 140. 
Town aid to volunteers 63, 66, 69, 73, 74, 

76. 
Town meetings, 61, 62, 63, 64, 68, 69, 73, 

74- 

U. 

Unassigned recruits, 150, 172. 
Union spy, 287. 

V. 

Veteran enlistments, 185. 

Veteran Reserve Corps, service in the, 

279, 283. 
Volunteers, number called for by the 

government during the war, 37, iii, 

116, 140, 141- 

W. 

Ward-master at Point Lookout Hospital, 

272. 

War meetings, 65, 67, 69, 72, 75. 

Washington, D.C-, grand military re- 
view at, (May 23, 1865), 132, 225, 245. 

Wounded soldiers and sailors, 120, 
145, 146, 148, 149, 154, 158, 160, 165, 
ic8, 181, 190, 192, 194, 195, 196, 199, 
200, 201, 204, 212, 215, 220, 234, 235, 
238, 244, 245, 286, 288, 290, 291, 294, 
306, 327, 328, 333, 335, 336, 339, 343, 
345, 346, 348, 349, 356, 359, 360, 367, 
. 369, 370, 371, 375, 378, 384, 389, 393, 
402, 406, 411, 412, 414. 



INDEX 



TO NAMES OF SOLDIERS AND SAILORS. 



Ackerman, Jonathan B., 253. 
Adams, George M., 9S, 220. 
Alger, Charles F., 166. 
Allen, Edwin, 271. 
Allen, William H., 133. 
Anderson, Ephraim, 203. 
Anderson, Louis, 271. 
Andrew, John A., 317. 
Andrews, Thomas, 297, 321. 
Andrews, Vernon W., 86. 

Bachelder, John B., 252. 
Bailey, Charles C, 227. 
Bailey, Charles H., 440. 
Bailey, George, 241, 323. 
Bailey, John W., 226. 
Bailey, Orietes L., 265. 
Baker, Calvin R., 271. 
Baker, John, 271. 
Ballentine, James, 286, 323. 
Barnes, Albert F., 172. 
Barnes, Augustus, 301. 
Barnes, Hosea O., 258, 324. 
Barnes, Joseph H., 175. 
Barnes, Thomas T., 260. 
Barnes, William, 2S6. 
Barnes, William T., 148. 
Barr, Edwin, 173. 
Barstow, Joseph, 271. 
Bassett, Charles H., 9S. 
Bates, Charles E., 228, 325. 
Battles, Otis L., 204. 
Beal, Arthur, 417. 
Beal, Caleb H., 17S, 221. 
57 



Beal, Daniel L., 204, 327. 
Beal, Laban O., 204. 
Beal, ^Villiam H., 142, 172, 328. 
Berry, Joseph N., 98. 
Bibby, George W., 98, 193, 328. 
Bicknell, George, 286. 
Binney, Elkanah, 305. 
Binney, Henry F., 100, 205. 
Blackman, John H., 151, 330. 
Blackman, Lemuel S., 147, 330. 
Blair, Frederick C, 301. 
Blanchard, Alvin, jun., 126. 
Blossom, Charles W., 155, 331. 
Blossom, Edward C, 169, 179. 
Blossom, Thomas D., jun., 194. 
Boen, George W., 271. 
Boiling, Augustus, 417. 
Bolster, Charles, 173. 
Bonney, George H., 272. 
Booth, Edwin, 272. 
Booth, James, 172. 
Botting, Fielder, jun., 253. 
Bouve, Edward T., 192, 261. 
Breen, John J., 146. 
Breen, William, 204, 332. 
Brigham, Thomas S., 133. 
Bronsdon, Samuel, 98, 162. 
Brown, Charles H., 130. 
Brown, Henrj-, 224. 
Brown, John, 182, 272. 
Bryant, James B., 100. 
Buker, Leonard E., 195. 
Burhenne, Franz, 252. 
Burnside, Robert, 128. 



450 



HINGHAM IN THE CIVIL WAR. 



Burr, Daniel H., 147, 333. 
Eurr, John W., 100. 
Burr, Joseph C, i8i.- 
Burrill, Oliver, 219 
Burtes, William, 149, 313. 
Buxton, John H., 86. 

Callahan, Martin, 86. 

Callahan, Patrick, 205. 

Campbell, Charles, 266, 303. 

Carr, Michael, 279. 

Carter, William, 13S, 153, 248. 

Carter, William M., 13S, 245. 

Carver, Justin A., 172. 

Carver, Thomas A., 100, 195. 

Carver, Wakefield, 133. 

Casey, Michael, 279. 

Cazaire, Louis (T. V. Z.) 223. 

Chadbourn, John C, 199. 

Champlin, David H., 237. 

Chandler, Ichabod W., 205. 

Chapman, Timothy B., 228. 

Chase, Cyrus H., 224. 

Chessman, John W., 142. 

Chubbuck, Eleazer, jun., 228. 

Chubbuck, George A., 253, 309. 

Churchill, James T., 229, 334. 

Churchill, Moses R., 205. 

Churchill, Rufus, 205. 

Churchill, Thaddeus, 226. 

Churchill, Thomas, 160, 335. 

Clapp, George A., 241. 

Clark, Rufus, 269. 

Clarke, Andrew J., 9S, 169. 

Clarke, Melzar W., 272. 

Cleverly, James M., 136. 

Cloney, Thomas, 265. 

Cobb, Silas H., 100, 199. 

Colberg, Swan P., 417. 

Collins, John, 272. 

Collins, Thomas, 272. 

Colman, William, 272. 

Conaley, Barney, 272. 

Conway, Thomas, 172. 

Cook, Charles, 272. 

Corbett, Charles, loi, 196. 

Corbett, Waldo F., 178. 

Corcoran, James, 417. 

Corcoran, Jeremiah J., loi, 236, 335. 



Cornell, Cornelius, 266. 
Corthell, Gustavus P., 205. 
Corthell, Nelson F., 160, 336. 
Corthell, Samuel N., 266. 
Cotton, Frederick W., 124. 
Crease, John B., 166, 337. 
Cresswell, John, 98, 229. 
Crosby, Joshua, jun., 253. 
Cummings, Robert M., 124. 
Cummings, William L., 266 
Cushing, David W., 221, 339. 
Cushing, Henry H., 287. 
Cushing, Jacob G., 98, 200, 339. 
Cushing, Laban F., 151. 
Cushing, Loring H., 123. 
Cushing, Martin, 287. 
Cushing, Robert, 112, 
Cushing, Theophilus, jun., 200. 
Cushing, Webster A., 248. 
Cushing, William B., 167, 340. 
Cushing, William G., jun., 309. 

Daggett, Henry, 272. 
Daggett, William A., 259, 265. 
Daley, Daniel, 164, 311. 
Daley, James, 133. 
Dallas, Horatio M., 273. 
Dalton, Thomas D., 273. 
Damon, Albert, 273. 
Damon, Andrew J., 229, 341, 
Damon, Charles H., loi. 
Damon^ Isaac B., 143. 
Davis, Thomas, 269. 
Dawes, John G., 183. 
Dawes, William L., 200. 
Dempsey, James, 273. 
Dolan, John, 279. 
Domick, John, 86. 
Donaven, John R., 133. 
Donnelin, Patrick, 279. 
Dow, Isaac M., loi, 311. 
Dow, Levi H., loi, 254. 
Downer, James M., 160. 

Downes, Henry B., 273. 

Dunbar, George, loi, 114. 

Dunbar, James D., 151, 

Dunbar, William, jun., 144, 221, 343. 

Dunham, George C, 134. 

Dustin, James S., 148. 



INDEX TO NAMES OF SOLDIERS AND SAILORS. 



451 



Dwelley, George C, loi. 
Dwelley, Hosea, loi. 
Dyer, Helen A., 343. 

Easton, Fergus A., 9S, 113. 
Edmands, John J., 151. 
Edson, Josiah, 273. 
Eichborn, Ernst F., 128. 
Eldredge, David P., 287. 
Eldredge, John C, 200. 
Eldredge, John W., 98, 196. 
Eldredge, West D., 273. 
Eldredge, William, 308. 
Evans, Edwin G., 12S. 
Everson, Francis W., loi. 
Ewell, Jacob A., 128. 
Eweil, Lendal H., 273. 
Ewer, Henry S., 98, 196. 

Fairfield, Moses, 280. 

Fardy, Robert F., 311. 

Fardy, William, 206. 

Farrar, George W., 267. 

Farrell, Richard J., 2S2, 345. 

Farrell, Thomas M., 273. 

Farrington, John A., 136. 

Fearing, George J., 136. 

Fearing, George W., loi, 122. 

Fearing, Hawkes, 2S4. 

Fearing, Perez F., 222, 346. 

Fee, Michael, 155, 347. 

Fitzgerald, James, 151, 348. 

Flemming, Michael, 2S0. 

Foley, Thomas, 280. 

Forrester, Peter, 280. 

Franey, Michael, 134. 

French, Charles E., 229, 349. 

French, George, jun., 206. 

French, Henry C , lor, 226, 349. 

French, James R., 256. 

French, John J. L., 2S7. 

French, Nathaniel, jun., 98, 193, 351. 

French, Thomas E., 200. 

Fuller, Charles M., 298. 

Fuller, Tilson, 117. 

Galvin, Edward, 280. 
Gardner, Alfred, 266. 
Gardner, Andrew W., 115, 135. 



Gardner, Charles, 267. 
Gardner, Charles A., loi. 
Gardner, George, 150. 
Gardner, George D., 229, 353. 
Gardner, George L., 171. 
Gardner, Henry, 206. 
Gardner, Henry C, loi. 
Gardner, Jacob, jun., 151. 
Gardner, Jason, 220. 
Gardner, John D , loi. 
Gardner, John W., 142, 30S, 354. 
Gill, Caleb B., 287, 356. 
Gill, Elijah B., jun., 142, 356. 
Gill, Nathaniel, 148, 357. 
Gilman, Frank H., 265. 
Gilman, William M.. 136, 
Glines, Alvin R., 229. 
Goodwin, Isaac F., 123. 
Gordon, Timothy, 274. 
Gorham, John G., 274. 
Gorman, James, 274. 
Gorman, John, 288. 
Gottchell, Edward, 312. 
Gould, Stephen P., 207. 
Gould, William K., 167, 207. 
Grace, Robert, 179. 
Gramburg, George, 165. 
Graves, Edward O., 164, 242, 246. 
Graves, Herbert, loi. 
Gray, James W., 133. 
Griffin, Thomas, 274. 
Grose, Dexter, 122. 
Grover, George A., 98, 165, 308. 

Hackett, Edward, 274. 

Halcro, Edward W., 298, 358. 

Hall, Mark, 274. 

Harden, Hosea, 2S8. 

Hardy, Otis C, 274. 

Harlow, William B., loi. 

Hart, Eben, 260. 

Hart, Henry, 136. 

Haskell, James M., 98. 197, 359. 

Hatch, Warren, jun., 208. 

Hatchfield, Benjamin, 310. 

Hayes, James, 275. 

Hayes, John H., 134. 

Haynes, Albert S., loi, 230, 360. 

Healey, James J., 147. 



452 



H INGHAM IN 7 HE CIl'IL WAK. 



Helms, Charles, 137. 
Henderson, Hiram W., 361. 
Henderson, Samuel J., 20S. 
Hersey, Albert, 230. 
Hersey, Daniel D., 362. 
Hersey, Edwin, iot-202. 
Hersey, Francis, 128. 
Hersey, George L., 230. 
Hersey, Henry F., 230. 
Hersey, Henry W., 304. 
"Hersey, Mollis, 123-363. 
Hersey, John Q., 209-363. 
Hersey, William H., 209. 
Hersey, William, jun., 209. 
Hervey, Thomas, 224-364- 
Hickey, James, 267. 
Hickey, Thomas, 263. 
Hicks, Lawrence, 280. 
Higgins, Sylvanus H., 210. 
Hillarston, William, 275. 
Hilton, Joseph H., 134. 
Hilton, William, 134. 
Hinckley, Edward B., 275. 
Hitchborn, Alexander, 150, 364- 
Hitchcock, Henry A., 275. 
Hobart, Elijah, 2S9, 365, 
Holden, Amos B., 193. 
Hudson, George iVI., 194. 
Humphrey, Edwin, 147, 367. 
Humphrey, George E., 98, 16S. 
Humphrey, Wallace, 210,369. 
Hunt, James L., 2d, 126. 
Hurley, Jeremiah, 275. 
Hurley, Jerry, 86. 

Jacob, Andrew, 165. 

Jacob, E. A., loi. 

Jacob, John Q., 98, 161. 

Jacob, Joshua, jun., 210. 

Jacob, William H., loi, 227. 

Jennings, Allen G., 289. 

Jermyn, Francis, 210. 

Jones, Benjamin L., 98, 312. 

Jones, Gardner, 210, 370. 

Jones, George, 269. 

Jones, Henry, 159. 

Jones, William, 126. 

Jones, William II.j lor, 161, 267, 371. 

Jones, William H., jun., 160, 373. 



Keefe, John, 280. 
Kelley, Edward, 275. 
Kelley, Patrick J., 134. 
Kelsey, Joseph B., 275. 
Kenerson, I>evi, 9S, 126. 
Kiiburn, Charles D., 259, 375. 
Kilburn, George P., 142. 
King, Joseph T., 86, 
Kittredge, 275. 

Landers, Michael, 137. 
Lane, Josiah M., 98. 
Lane, Morallus, 21 1. 
Lane, Parker E., 9S, 376. 
Lane, William H , 275. 
Leavitt, Charles B., 289. 
Leroy, Charles, 232. 
Lincoln, Abraham, 87 
Lincoln, Alden, 307. 
Lincoln, Alfred A., loi, 211. 
Lincoln, Benjamin, 376. 
Lincoln, Benjamin C, 228, 37S. 
Lincoln, Beza H., 290. 
Lincoln, Daniel vS., lor, 308, 379. 
Lincoln, Daniel W., 98. 
Lincoln, Ensign, 236. 
Lincoln, Jairus, jun., 119. 
Lincoln, John, jun., 290. 
Lincoln, John \V, 172. 
Lincoln, Leavitt, 291, 3S0. 
Lincoln, Revere, 112. 
Lincoln, Samuel M., 170, 381. 
Lincoln, Warren P., 3S2. 
Lincoln, William O., jun., 41S. 
Litchfield, James L., 246. 
Litchfield, John H., jun., 126. 
Litchfield, Allyne C, 291, 
Little, Henry O., 128. 
Livingston, Henry B., 281, 383. 
Loring, Charles H., 296. 
Loring, Isaiah W., 252. 
Loring, Meltiah, 211. 
Loring, Peter, 123. 
Lowe, Jacob, 275. 
Lowry, James, 292. 
Lowry, William, jun., 128. 
Lucas, Matthew H., 270. 

Maguire, John C, 276. 



INDEX TO NAMES OF SOLDIERS AND SAfLORS. 



45; 



Mahony, Patrick, 276. 
Manill, John, 86. 
Manix, John, 179. 
Manuel, John L., 3S3. 
Marsh, Alphonso, 239. 
Marsh, Caleb B., iiS. 
Marsh, Charles H., 148, 384. 
Marsh, Josiah L., 128. 
Marston, William H., loi. 
Mayhew, Francis, 13S, 253. 
Mayhevv, John R., 129. 
McCarty, James, 197. 
McCrane, Patrick, 41 8. 
McDonald, John, 245. 
McGrane, Michael, 276. 
McGregor, James, 281. 
McKay, James, 163. 
McKenna, Daniel, 124. 
McLaughlin, Edward, 2S1. 
McLaughlin, John, 260. 
McNamara, James, 134. 
McNeal, Paul, 212. 
Meade, Charles S., 197, 3S5. 
Meade, PVancis K., 252. 
Meagher, Dennis, 155. 
Mears, Samuel T., 161. 
Merritt, Billings, 224. 
Merritt, George H., 313, 388. 
Merrow, Arvander, 265. 
Meservey, Benjamin F., 158. 
Miller, Daniel H., 254. 
Miller, Frank H., 212. 
Miller, George L., 9S. 
Miller, Henry F., 228, 3S9. 
Miller, Joseph S., 267. 
Miller, William C, 148. 
Morse, Henry G., 213. 
Morse, John E., 154, 165. 
Morse, Joshua, 98. 
Mullian, Dennis, 282. 
Murphy, Daniel, 292, 390. 
Murphy, Owen, 138, 156. 
Murphy, Thomas R., 311. 
Muschatt, Charles H., 276. 

Nathan, Joseph, 270. 
Neal, John S., 232, 391. 
Neal, William L., 292. 
Nelson, William T., 98. 



Newcomb, Hiram, 2d, 213, 392. 
Newcomb, Levi C, 232. 
Newcomb, Samuel, 2d, 267, 306. 
Nicholas, Job, 86. 
Nickerson. Franklin, 298. 
Nolan, John ]\L, 213. 
Noyes, Joseph H., 254, 2S2. 

O'Brien, John, 173. 
Olson, Andrew P., 392. 
Osborn, George H., 276. 
Ourish, Jacob, loi, 181. 
Ourish, Peter, 197, 393. 

Parry, John, 198. 
Peacock, George, 138, 255. 
Peare, Nathaniel B., 213. 
Pierce, Albert L., loi, 394. 
Pendergast, Daniel W., 129, 395. 
Perkins, William, 2S2. 
Pettingell, David, 139, 156. 
Poiney, Edwin, 276. 
Poole, Charles H., 232. 
Poole, Joseph M., 142. 
Pratt, Harvey M., 201. 
Preston, Edward L., 276. 
Prouty, Benjamin W., 233. 
Prouty, Elijah, 99, 233, 396. 
Prouty, George M., 213. 
Prouty, Isaac, 233. 
Prouty, James B., 214. 
Prouty, John H., loi, 226. 
Prouty, William, jun., lor, 233. 
Pugsley, Sewall, 167, 396. 
Putnam, George W. R., 134. 

Rafferty, Thomas, jun., 2r4, 26S. 
Randall, William, 276. 
Raymond, James G., 265, 398. 
Raymond, Theodore, 99. 
Ready, Peter, 174. 
Keardon, Michael, 418. 
Reed, John A., 127. 
Reed, George R., 9S, 192. 
Remington, Charles, 293. 
Remington, Foster, 214. 
Rich, George L., 135. 
Rich, William, 41 8. 
Richardson, Charles, 149. 



454 



H INGHAM IN THE CIVIL WAR. 



Richardson, George E., 255, 308. 
Riley, Dennis, 86. 
Riley, William F., 214. 
Roach, Edward, 276. 
Roach, Joshua, 224, 397. 
Roach, Michael, 137. 
Roberts, Ebenezer F., 99, 144. 
Robinson, David P., 277. 
Robinson, William W., 161, 398. 
Rogers, John F., 293. 
Rollins, Joseph, 255. 
Rounds, Cushman, 224. 
Royal, Peter H., 224. 
Ryan, John, 418. 

Sawj-er, Albert, 277. 
Scully, Dennis, 268, 400, 
Shute, Charles, 137. 
Simmons, Franklin, 277. 
Simmons, Joseph, 233, 400. 
Simpson, Louis L., 23S. 
Smith, George, 120. 
Smith, George E , 162. 
Snell, John E., 215. 
Souther, Benjamin S., 98. 
Souther, James, 129. 
Souther, John S., 99, 215. 
Souther, Samuel C., 124. 
Souther, Thomas, 124. 
Spaulding, Henry E., 293. 
Spear, Edward A. F., 233, 401. 
Spellman, Edmund, 26S. 
Spencer, Jeremiah, 161. 
Spencer, Samuel, 151, 402. 
Sprague, Artemas, 129. 
Sprague, Charles, 98. 
Sprague, Peter N., 98, 239. 
Sprague, Seth M., 234. 
Sprague, Thomas, 2d, 234, 403. 
Sprague, William T., 277. 
Sprague, William Wallace, 152. 
Sprague, William Waters, 124. 
Spurr, Charles E., 255. 
Spurr, Warren R., 419. 
Stephenson, E. T. C, 127. 
Stephenson, Henry, 98. 
Stephenson, Luther, jun., 98, 191. 
Stephenson, William L, 127. 
Stewart, Charles A., 299. 



Stockwell, Alonzo G., 234. 
Stockwell, WilliamJ., 99, 182, 403. 
Stodder, Alfred W., 99. 
Stodder, Charles H. F., loi, 203. 
Stodder, Daniel, 310. 
Stodder, Demerick, loi, 215, 405. 
Stodder, Edgar P., 201. 
Stodder, Franklin A., 216. 
Stodder, George W., 152. 
Stodder, John H., 114. 
Stodder, Washington I., 202, 406. 
Stuart, John, 86. 
Studley, Horace L., 216, 406. 
Sturtevant, James S., 98. 
Sullivan, John, 182. 
Sullivan, Philip, 139, 156. 
Swan, Aaron D., 139, 256. 
Swears, Henry, 151, 407. 

Talbot, John T., 240. 
Tapp, Anton, 153, 249. 
Taylor, William, loi, 216. 
Tettler, James, 281. 
Thomas, Alpheus, loi. 
Thomas, Benjamin, 262. 
Thomas, Edwin, 251. 
Thomas, Francis, 151, 40S. 
Thomas, George, 179. 
Thomas, Hiram, 222. 
Thomas, Joseph M., 113, 131. 
Thomas, Wallace, 148. 
Thomas, William H , 216. 
Thompson, Daniel J., 313. 
Thompson, Michael F., 282, 409. 
Thompson, William, 277. 
Tilton, Frank H., 268, 410. 
Tinmons, Charles, 281. 
Tinsley, Thomas, 142, 411. 
Tirrell, Edwin F., 252. 
Tisdale, Charles H., 234. 
Torrey, Franklin J., 235. 
Torrey, William C, 247. 
Tower, Alvin, 99, 165, 411. 
Tower, Andrew, 297. 
Tower, Charles, 124. 
Tower, George F., 257. 
Tower, Lsaiah F., 293. 
Trabbitts, Edward, 129. 
Tracv, Edward L., 162. 



INDEX TO NAMES OF SOLDIERS AND SAILORS. 



455 



Trask, Sumner A., 202. 
Trowbridge, Henry, 313. 
Trussel, John M., 300. 
Tufts, Robert, 162. 
Tulley, Herbert J., 129. 
Tyler, Alfred, 246. 

Veil, Christian, 86. 
Vinal, Melzar, 137. 
Vogel, Henry B., 137. 

Wade, James H., 223. 
Wagner, Adolph, 86. 
Walls, Daniel J., 129. 
Walls, Joseph N., 137. 
Waters, Isaac G., 99, 198. 
Watson, John A., 135. 
Welch, John, 242, 247. 
Welsh, Joseph W., 282. 
Weston, Thomas, 158. 
Whiting, Alfred B., 303. 
Whiting, Benjamin S., 294. 
Whiting, Webster A., 294. 



Whitman, Henry, 256. 
Whiton, John C, 122, 243. 
Whiton, Lyman B., 98, 192, 250. 
Whiton, William S., 98. 
Whittier, John M., 86. 
Wilder, Albert, 235, 412. 
Wilder, Charles E., 217, 413. 
Wilder, Ezra, jun., 217. 
Wilder, George, 217. 
Wilder, Joshua, 218. 
Wilder, Nathaniel, 2d, 19S. 
Willard, Horatio P., 21S, 414. 
Williams, James H., 282. 
W^ilson, Don Pedro, 155, 415. 
Wilson, John E., 133. 
Winslow, Philo C, 26S. 
Wolfe, George, 99. 
Wolfe, George A., 218. 
Wood, Nelson T., 173. 

Yager, Conrad P., 294, 4it). 
Young, Charles C, 228. 





■• }.mw.vxi}}i ww)})i 





■i^^SSSSfiii